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Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Art lives here, art plays here, art works here

Springfield, MA   |  http://SPRINGFIELDCULTURE.ORG
GuideStar Charity Check

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

EIN: 81-2515358


Mission

Springfield Cultural Partnership’s Mission is to foster civic engagement and arts education in the City of Springfield by creating and sustaining a vibrant cultural environment, authentically engaging institutions, artists, and the community. The Springfield Cultural Partnership’s Vision is to succeed as a significant force in the region’s creative community by contributing to economic vitality and cultural enrichment. The Cultural Partnership fosters synergy and alignment of cultural resources that create an enriching, welcoming experience for Springfield visitors and residents alike.

Notes from the nonprofit

Springfield Cultural Partnership (SCP) is a convener that connects the dots between community needs, creatives, organizations and resources. SCP mobilizes youth, artists, faith leaders, educators, health professionals, and other trusted community influencers to create culturally relevant and representative arts programming, convenings and collaborative relationships that lead to improved community outcomes related to economic growth and community wellbeing. We leverage Springfield’s cultural assets and respected sources of influence in the community to increase access to resources, programming and to foster hope and healing. We also provide equity and other panels and training for members and artists. Arts are a resource for community empowerment. Artists are often deeply embedded into the communities in which they reside, making them ideal agents of change.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive DIrector

Karen Finn

Arts & Culture Coordinator

Kali Green

Main address

127 State St

Springfield, MA 01103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-2515358

Subject area info

Urban development

Population served info

Families

People of African descent

People of Latin American descent

Multiracial people

Artists and performers

NTEE code info

Urban, Community (S31)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Springfield Cultural Partnership (SCP) is a convener that connects the dots between community needs, creatives, organizations and resources. SCP mobilizes youth, artists, faith leaders, educators, health professionals, and other trusted community influencers to create culturally relevant and representative arts programming, convenings and collaborative relationships that lead to improved community outcomes related to economic growth and community wellbeing. We leverage Springfield’s cultural assets and respected sources of influence in the community to increase access to resources, programming and to foster hope and healing. We also provide equity and other panels and training for members and artists. Arts are a resource for community empowerment. Artists are often deeply embedded into the communities in which they reside, making them ideal agents of change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SPark! IGNITING OUR COMMUNITY

SPark! IGNITING OUR COMMUNITY
In November, 2021, the Springfield Museums and the Springfield Cultural Partnership celebrated the artists and their public artworks that have transformed Pynchon Plaza into a dynamic museum without walls, a vibrant public space with innovative multi-media art installations by local artists. The SPark! project has ignited our community with public art installations in Pynchon Plaza, in Downtown Springfield. The project — a collaboration between The Springfield Museums, Springfield Cultural Partnership , Mayor Domenic Sarno, The Springfield Parks and Recreation Department, and the Springfield Business Improvement District — included a call for proposals that would transform Pynchon Plaza into a dynamic museum without walls, a vibrant public space with innovative multi-media art installations by local artists.
https://springfieldculture.org/spark/

Population(s) Served

TRUST TRANSFER PROJECT is a partnership between Community Music School of Springfield and Springfield Cultural Partnership, led by Program Director Vanessa Ford. This initiative allows our local artists to lead in health messaging that will directly impact the lives of their family, neighbors and friends, offering a unique opportunity for us to depend on one another to share and receive health messages in a creative and inspirational way. Initially designed to build trust through the eyes of the most impacted by Covid-19, Trust Transfer Project is also focused on community care centered around Mental Wellness and Food Justice by transforming the health of our communities one artistic message at a time.

Population(s) Served

This non-Traditional pop-up gallery event for local artists is an opportunity for local artists to showcase their artwork and network with the public and local businesses and organizations, in Downtown Springfield. SCP is proud to be able to support Springfield’s creative community — both artists and visitors — with this free event and a financial award to each of the artists.

Population(s) Served

The Painted Pianos Project is a summer tradition of the Springfield Cultural Partnership. Pianos are painted by local artists and are displayed across Springfield for the public to play and enjoy during the summer months. One of the Springfield Cultural Partnership’s pianos went viral this week when Pastor Archbishop Timothy Paul and musician Shamrock came together in a random, musical moment — a true embodiment of the SCP Painted Piano project!

Population(s) Served

The Creative Leaders Program is a multi-step process intended to strengthen our local artists and creative leaders and encourage them to grow in their ability to showcase their talents through exhibits and events within the community — growing their influence and celebrating their role in driving the local economy. The CLP is an inclusive effort, affecting economic development and playing a distinct role in bringing our cultural community together all through mentorship, skill building and skill sharing.

Population(s) Served

Starting in 2015, the SCP has worked to incorporate more art as part of economic development in Downtown Springfield. The community loved the kick-off event in Stearns Square Park during the “Springfield Under the Stars” movie night and more boxes have been painted over the years.

The purpose of this project is two-fold: first, to beautify the streets and create unique and interesting pedestrian sights; second, to provide economic opportunity to local artists who are trying to make a living creating art in Springfield. We see this project as a free outdoor gallery that is accessible to everyone.

Population(s) Served

Through Thank an Artist activities, the Springfield Cultural Partnership recognizes and showcases the work of our local artists, cultural organization and events, creating deep and lasting connections among Springfield’s creative community. We are so proud of the rich, diverse creative community in our city!
On Saturday, September 21, 2019 the Springfield Cultural Compact hosted it’s inaugural Thank an Artist event, celebrating Springfield’s creative community.

In 2020, Thank an Artist went virtual with a weekly radio highlight of our artists, cultural organizations and events. Tune into local radio station WTCC 90.7 on Thursdays or visit our Thank an Artist playlist on YouTube to listen to all our highlights!

Population(s) Served

https://springfieldculture.org/collaborations/

The Springfield Cultural Partnership Projects are a celebration of community, creativity, and the City of Springfield.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Affiliations & memberships

Mass Cultural Council Cultural District 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollars paid to artists

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Trust Transfer Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Springfield Cultural Partnership builds:
- Trusting, lasting relationships between Black and Latinx residents, organizations, and artists – building trust, building sustainability​
- Cross-sector partnerships between health organizations, faith communities, artists, community organizations – Coming together towards a common goal. This includes - setting goals, making sure the right partners are selected, leaving time to build trust between entities. ​

Supporting Systemic Change advancing:
- “Vibrancy” (Quality of Life & Livability Benefit)
- Change in Individual Lives (jobs, skills, belonging)​
- Social Change (sympathy, understanding, exchange)​
- Change in Creative Practice​
- Economic Change (workforce development and collaborative relationship building & sharing networks)​​
- The future of individuals, communities, our nation, and the arts.

Springfield Cultural Partnership builds:
- Trusting, lasting relationships between Black and Latinx residents, organizations, and artists – building trust, building sustainability​
- Cross-sector partnerships between health organizations, faith communities, artists, community organizations – Coming together towards a common goal. This includes - setting goals, making sure the right partners are selected, leaving time to build trust between entities. ​

Supporting Systemic Change advancing:
- “Vibrancy” (Quality of Life & Livability Benefit)
- Change in Individual Lives (jobs, skills, belonging)​
- Social Change (sympathy, understanding, exchange)​
- Change in Creative Practice​
- Economic Change (workforce development and collaborative relationship building & sharing networks)​​
- The future of individuals, communities, our nation, and the arts.

MISSION: Springfield Cultural Partnership’s Mission is to foster civic engagement and arts education in the City of Springfield by creating and sustaining a vibrant cultural environment, authentically engaging institutions, artists, and the community. The Springfield Cultural Partnership’s Vision is to succeed as a significant force in the region’s creative community by contributing to economic vitality and cultural enrichment. The Cultural Partnership fosters synergy and alignment of cultural resources that create an enriching, welcoming experience for Springfield visitors and residents alike. Guiding Values are Collaboration, Community, Diversity & Inclusion, Innovation, Respect. By further building these partnerships, SPC will enhance racial, economic and educational equity through program delivery that has integrity, while valuing the partnership there is great interest in maintaining authorship of the artist.

Following our mission will allow us to center the Springfield Cultural Partnership and Cultural Compact around an artist-driven Reputation & Identity Movement for Springfield, MA by creating a coalition where artists and community come together to address hard problems by activation networks. Community investment in what the community wants to see and reflect it back within the community has a multiplying positive effect on the economy. Moreover, this funding is a catalyst to future funding opportunities by building a stronger foundation for securing future funding through health care grants, arts and cultural grants and beyond.

Creating and sustaining a vibrant cultural environment, authentically engaging institutions, artists, and the community. Springfield Cultural Partnership continues to advance its goal of placemaking and programming to amplify its mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

53.75

Average of 25.32 over 7 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16.3

Average of 9.5 over 7 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

25%

Average of 9% over 7 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $48,281 $52,185 $86,399 $92,716 $39,143
As % of expenses 18.8% 24.9% 48.9% 38.2% 14.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $48,281 $52,185 $86,399 $92,716 $39,143
As % of expenses 18.8% 24.9% 48.9% 38.2% 14.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $305,183 $289,163 $235,794 $335,208 $301,039
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% -5.2% -18.5% 42.2% -10.2%
Program services revenue 62.9% 22.0% 9.2% 30.1% 0.0%
Membership dues 11.1% 11.1% 10.2% 6.5% 8.4%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 26.0% 66.9% 80.6% 63.4% 91.4%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $256,902 $209,678 $176,695 $242,492 $261,896
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% -18.4% -15.7% 37.2% 8.0%
Personnel 18.6% 45.2% 50.2% 53.2% 55.1%
Professional fees 1.8% 15.3% 22.7% 2.9% 2.3%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.3% 2.7% 1.1% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 79.6% 39.3% 24.4% 42.8% 42.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $256,902 $209,678 $176,695 $242,492 $261,896
One month of savings $21,409 $17,473 $14,725 $20,208 $21,825
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $20,000 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $278,311 $227,151 $191,420 $282,700 $283,721

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 3.4 10.2 16.3 20.4 16.3
Months of cash and investments 3.4 10.2 16.3 20.4 16.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.7 7.5 14.8 15.4 16.0
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $73,064 $177,867 $240,506 $412,441 $355,816
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $7,213 $0 $0 $7,000 $250
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.0% 12.2% 10.0% 26.0% 1.9%
Unrestricted net assets $79,507 $131,692 $218,091 $310,807 $349,950
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $27,300 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $79,507 $158,992 $218,091 $310,807 $349,950

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive DIrector

Karen Finn

Karen Finn is the Executive Director of the Springfield Cultural Partnership. In her current role, she works to advance the SCP’s mission of sustaining strong and secure arts and cultural environment in Springfield. She has been an entrepreneur and business owner as well as held positions with higher education and the federal government. She has experience in community service, advocacy, and program management. Karen also holds a Master’s of Business Administration (MBA) degree and is a recipient of the prestigious U.S. Presidential Management Fellowship. She relocated to the Springfield MA area in 2018 with her husband, two sons, and two Bernese Mountain Dogs. She and her family enjoy partaking in cultural events, skiing, and traveling.

Arts & Culture Coordinator

Kali Green

Kali Green is the Arts & Cultural Coordinator for Springfield Cultural Partnership. She supports our programming, collaborations, marketing and weekly “Thank an Artist” segment on WTCC 90.7 FM. Kali uses her creative talents to highlight arts and culture within Springfield. Kali is a Springfield native, artist, Make-It Springfield fellow and graduate of AIC. Her passion for the local arts ecosystem allows her to challenge the bounds of how to best elevate the partnership and community creatives. In addition to focusing on her art, she curates art for the Artist Cafe in downtown Springfield, is a partner for HeyBigHeads and is highly involved in supporting Springfield’s local arts and cultural community.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Springfield Cultural Partnership Incorporated

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Eileen McCaffery

Community Music School of Springfield


Board co-chair

Andrew Cade

Springfield Cultural Council

Scott Hanson

Treasurer

Richard Griffin

Mass Development

Kateri Walsh

City of Springfield, City Council

Molly Fogarty

Springfield Libraries

Russell Peotter

Ex-Officio

Jessica Collins

Public Health Institute of Western MA

Roberta Wilmore

Make-It Springfield

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/01/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.