PLATINUM2024

Health Bridges International, Inc.

CHAMPIONING CHILDREN AND THE COMMUNITIES THAT CARE FOR THEM.

aka HBI, Health Bridges   |   Portland, OR   |  http://www.hbint.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Health Bridges International, Inc.

EIN: 20-3681041


Mission

Health Bridges International is dedicated to a world where every child, youth, and young adult has access to health, hope, home, and purpose. We build evidence-based models to protect vulnerable children and families.

Notes from the nonprofit

HBIs evolution and accomplishments over 2023 were remarkable. We are incredibly proud because HBI is a small NGO that operates on a modest budget ($750K). Health Bridges International has evolved from a predominantly US-based leadership team to an NGO registered in Peru with Peruvian leaders and BOD. We are proud to employ 42 talented individuals on our staff, all of whom are Peruvian, except for two. Working with our staff and Peruvian communities, in 2023, HBI accomplished the following milestones: Operated two homes for formerly abandoned boys, expanded our newborn resuscitation training program with the Peruvian College of Nursing, grew our program for supporting graduating young men with case management, scholarships, and life transition support, trained several organizations on our unique Community of Excellence model, and expanded the impact our mentorship training program, implemented four IRB-approved research studies and purchased the Casa Girasoles Cusco property.

Ruling year info

2006

Founder and Executive Director

Dr. Wayne Anthony Centrone

Main address

PO Box 8813

Portland, OR 97207 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Health Bridges

EIN

20-3681041

Subject area info

Community improvement

Youth development

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Young adults

Women and girls

Caregivers

Economically disadvantaged people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Health Bridges International (HBI) works to build bridges of collaboration within extremely impoverished and marginalized communities. We are dedicated to sustainability and the development of projects that realize long-term change. To this end, HBI connects resources to needs through innovative programs, cutting edge technology and projects that build local level change agents. The work of HBI is grounded in Four Pillars of Bridge Building: Training, Consulting, Connecting and Serving. HBI grew out of the vision of a physician who first worked in Latin America over 25 years ago and witnessed immense health care needs. HBI builds bridges of collaboration - empowering communities to source their own futures – while delivering evidence-based health and human services.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Ines Project for Medically Fragile Children

It is estimated that 140 million children worldwide are orphans - with millions living in state sponsored homes or orphanages. And, although efforts are underway around the world to move children out of institutional settings, many children remain and fall through the cracks of adequate care and support. In the country of Perú, there are hundreds of orphanages, homes and state-sponsored institutional care settings. Many are disconnected from a reliable record keeping system and a holistic understanding of the needs of the children in their care. In 2014, HBI developed and prototyped an innovative approach to caring for children living in orphanages and institutional settings. The tool, entitled Girasoles Sanos or Healthy Sunflower, is a web-based health monitoring system that allows programs working with marginalized youth to monitor and evaluate holistic health needs. HBI is working with a team of technologists, designers and child-welfare specialists to finalize the next phase of the web-tool so it can be field tested in orphanages around Latin American and validated for use around the world.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
Children and youth

It is estimated that 140 million children worldwide are orphans - with millions living in state sponsored homes or orphanages. And, although there are efforts underway around the world to move children out of institutional settings, many children remain and fall through the cracks of adequate care and support. In the country of Perú, there are hundreds of orphanages, homes and state-sponsored institutional care settings. Many are disconnected from a reliable record keeping system and a holistic understanding of the needs of the children in their care. In 2014, HBI developed and prototyped an innovative approach to caring for children living in orphanages and institutional settings. The tool, entitled Girasoles Sanos or Healthy Sunflower, is a web-based health monitoring system that allows programs working with marginalized youth to monitor and evaluate holistic health needs. HBI is working with a team of technologists, designers and child-welfare specialists to finalize the next phase of the web-tool so it can be field tested in orphanages around Latin American and validated for use around the world.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Children and youth

The Peruvian healthcare system has no standardized training for teaching medical professionals, including physicians, midwives, and nurses to provide neonatal resuscitation to newborn babies. Over the past two decades, Peru’s healthcare system has dramatically reduced the incidence of neonatal mortality – from more than 75 deaths per 1,000 births in 1990 to nearly 8 deaths per 1,000 births in 2017 – by mandating women give birth in state run hospitals or birthing centers and by instituting maternal health controls. However, in rural and underserved regions in Perú, an area that contains almost half of the entire population of the country, it is estimated that up to 75% of women give birth in their homes or in small clinics with only a single health care provider. There is a need for expanding the training of these health professionals. HBI, in collaboration with the Peruvian College of Midwives, has developed a model to train all 30,000 midwives in Perú through a train-the-trainer structure. To date, we have trained over 380 trainers in 26 departments. The trainers have conducted over 550 trainings and trained nearly 10,000 midwives. The Neonatal Resuscitation Train-the-Trainer Program is a model to enable healthcare providers to build their own future training. We are not just helping the Peruvian health system develop a training program to train all the birth attendants in the country, we are helping to build a model that will train professionals well into the future.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Economically disadvantaged people

In October 2007, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) developed a comprehensive curriculum for training emergency first responders in the knowledge and skills they need to provide pre-hospital emergency care. The curriculum, translated into Spanish in 2009, includes a number of sequentially designed modules and learning activities. In 2014, the Peruvian National Firefighters Association began requiring all volunteer firefighters in the country complete a training program on emergency first response. The training program developed by the Peruvian National Firefighters Association was located in the capital City of Lima, and proved to be a hardship for many volunteer firefighters to attend due to a range of logistical challenges. In an attempt to build bridges of support for firefighters around Peru - Health Bridges International developed a train-the-training model for advancing the USAID training curriculum. The train-the-trainer program, currently in pilot implementation in the City of Arequipa, brings together trainers to train them in the knowledge and skills of training other volunteer firefighters. The Master Trainers – qualified, certified volunteer emergency response specialists – are the model for scaling the impact of the USAID curriculum. The development, implementation, and validation of a standardized train-the-trainer curriculum will allow scaling of emergency first response trainings throughout Latin American.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Economically disadvantaged people

Around the world, iron deficiency anemia is a public health condition of epidemic proportions. If left untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious health problems. In children, severe anemia can impair growth and motor and mental development. Researchers estimate that nearly 2 billion people – over 30% of the world’s population – are anemic, many due to iron deficiency. According to epidemiological surveys conducted by the Perú Ministry of Health, the country-wide incidence of anemia in children under three years of age is 45.3%. In the District of Cayma in the City of Arequipa, where HBI is pilot testing an Anemia Prevention and Treatment Program, the incidence of anemia is suspected to be almost 50% in children under 5- years old. Working in partnership with the Ministry of Health in the District of Cayma, the Catholic Parish of St. Helen’s, and local health promoters – HBI has undertaken a community-based project to create a model that can be scaled anywhere in the world to provide a holistic intervention for identifying, treating and preventing iron deficiency anemia.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Women and girls

Health Bridges is committed to help train the next generation of health care professionals. To this end, we lead service learning trips, provide rotation and training experience for health professions students and offer long term internships. We partner with universities, colleges and institutions of higher learning in the U.S., U.K. and Canada. in addition to our service learning projects, we are also critically invested in researching the impact of service learning. We have a five year IRB approved study in collaboration with Universidad Catholica Santa Maria in Arequipa, Peru and Linfield College School of Nursing in Portland, Oregon to studyn the impact of service learning on early career nursing students.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Young adults

It is estimated that more than 140 million children worldwide are orphans with millions living in state sponsored homes or orphanages. And, although efforts are underway around the world to move children out of institutional settings, many children remain and fall through the cracks of inadequate care and support. In the country of Perú, there are hundreds of orphanages, homes and state-sponsored institutional care settings. Many are disconnected from a structured, evidence-based approach to nurturing marginalized youth.

Starting in January 2019, the U.S. and Peruvian-based non-governmental organization HBI took over the operations of two homes for formerly abandoned boys in Perú. The goal of the project is the development of a Center of Excellence for serving marginalized youth. HBI is working to build a model that can be evaluated for its evidence and scaled to service delivery programs around the globe.

The five-year Center of Excellence model is just getting started. HBI is working with a team of subject matter experts, researchers, and child development specialists from around the globe to create and evaluate the model.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Tiger Project works with transitioning formerly abandoned and homeless youth and young adults to help them identify and leverage pathways to the futures they deserve. The project works with young adults transitioning from a life on the streets, aging out of residential care programs, leaving periods of incarceration and institutionalization, or sorting through a myriad of life challenges. Through professional services like psychological counselling, social work, and peer mentoring – the project works with young adults to build resilience by learning the knowledge and skills of self-advocacy and systems navigation. Helping the tigers - as the young men like to refer to themselves, tap into government entitlements and faith-based and NGO programs, helps them to build future opportunities. The project helps formerly abandoned and homeless youth identify the supports they can use to rebuild their lives through the transitions.

Population(s) Served

Health Bridges International, a U.S. and Perú based non-governmental organization with over 25 years’ experience working in global child welfare, is working with the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University (U.S.) and Universidad Católica Santa Maria (Perú) on a Center of Excellence model for reshaping child welfare services. The Center of Excellence model provides a holistic roadmap to prepare and equip orphanages, foster-care programs, and child-welfare settings for serving marginalized youth. Included in the model is a training framework to build attachment and resilience, practical guidance on applying evidence-based practices, culturally appropriate support to reinforce best practices, resources to reshape child-welfare services into whole-child empowerment services.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships

Since 2017, Health Bridges has been running a cycling team at the Casa Girasoles home for abandoned children in Ica, Perú. The team, made up of Casa Girasoles boys aged 3-18, races in local events. Through cycling, the boys are finding health, hope, and purpose.

Central to the Cycling Team programming are the connections built between US-based youth advocates and Peruvian youth from Casa Girasoles. From 2018 to 2023, HBI collaborated with Transitional Youth, an Oregon-based nonprofit, through the Transitional Youth Braking Cycles program to build and donate bikes to Peruvian youth. Today, HBI is continuing to work with volunteers who are eager to help in getting more bikes to Peruvian communities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of entities served by expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers

Related Program

Service Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The HBI The Newborn Resuscitation Training program provides subject matter and logistical expertise to order a model training program for healthcare professionals working in labor and delivery.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Neonatal Resuscitation Train-the-Trainer Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through our neonatal resuscitation training train-the-trainer program - we have trained teams of trainers who are going on to train thousands of midwives in lifesaving NRP.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth

Related Program

Girasoles Sanos Homes for Abandoned Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Girasoles Sanos program is developing a model of care delivery for marginalize and underserved youth who have experience homelessness or abandonment. We are building a model care delivery program.

Average number of dollars per person served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Comunidad Girasoles Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We've refined our care delivery models to assure the highest rate of return on dollars invested. This includes care delivery to families with children living with a disability and underserved youth.

Number of youth with special health care needs receiving pediatric-to-adult health care transition planning

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

The Ines Project for Medically Fragile Children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have greatly increased our servic e model to better meet the needs of transitional age youth and young adults.

Number of individuals who are receiving timely health/dental exams

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Infants and toddlers, People of Latin American descent

Related Program

Anemia Prevention and Treatment Collaboration Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We stopped direct care in 2020

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Caregivers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Girasoles Sanos Homes for Abandoned Youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We believe in trauma informed, strengths based and motivationally enhanced services. Our team is trained in all aspects of these important evidence based practices.

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders

Related Program

Emergency Response Together Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We've trainined thousands of professionals - but more than that, we've trained progrssioonals who have gone on to train thouransds of other professionals

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers, Emergency responders

Related Program

Emergency Response Together Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Across our training portfolio - emergency medicine, NRP, prehospital care - we are seeing a large increase in the number of health professionals and first responders getting training.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

The Ines Project for Medically Fragile Children

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have transitioned the Ines Project to our partner the Anglican Church of Peru.

Number of children receiving medical services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Anemia Prevention and Treatment Collaboration Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2023, we transitioned our Ines Project to the Anglican Church of Peru. HBI continues to provide technical assistance to the project, but we are no longer the owner of the program.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People of Latin American descent, Emergency responders

Related Program

Emergency Response Together Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our goal is to build bridges for greater collaboration between organizations and groups. This includes training health professionals, bringing together change agents, and mobilizing communities.

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Girasoles Sanos Homes for Abandoned Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In alignment with our Center of Excellence Project, we have staffed trained in EBPs for child-empowerment.

Number of youth-led community service projects

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships

Related Program

Girasoles Sanos Homes for Abandoned Youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Activists, Academics

Related Program

Service Learning

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HBI offers a diverse portfolio of professional development, service learning and experimental invetigation opportunites. We partner with medical schools, nursing schools, and undergraduate programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The foundation of HBI’s work is collaboration. This means bringing together groups of volunteers, community stakeholders, and professionals from a broad continuum of experiences. Our goal is to connect the various parts of any one project or program so that resources can be shared and outcomes sustained.

HBI works within a framework of our Four Pillars of Bridge Building. HBI undertakes projects that emphasize partnerships, encourage broad participation from a number of stakeholder groups, and develop programmatic models rooted in sustainability and transferability.

For over 25 years Health Bridges International has worked globally to connect resource with needs. HBI is uniquely positioned to accomplish this work through a dedicated team (all of the core team members of HBI have worked for the NGO for more than 10 years) of subject matter experts, thought leaders and community change agents. HBI has a leadership team with credentials in international development, research on evidence based practices and approaches for underserved and marginalized communities, and population specific experience. The Executive Director of HBI is one of the worlds leading experts on health services delivery to adolescents and young adults experiencing homelessness and abandonment.

HBI is strategically positioned for significant growth. Programmatically, our work is reaching thousands and making big impacts in the training of professionals, development of models of service delivery, and advocating for the needs of underserved women and children. HBI works to develop models of service delivery to scale our impact and build more bridges for some of the most marginalized communities around the world.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, Shape programs and projects

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

45.16

Average of 4.97 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.5

Average of 4.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11%

Average of 8% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Health Bridges International, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Health Bridges International, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Health Bridges International, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Health Bridges International, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $79,770 $29,278 $109,478 -$25,908 -$55,650
As % of expenses 20.5% 5.7% 19.5% -3.9% -9.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $78,383 $28,508 $108,992 -$26,873 -$56,169
As % of expenses 20.1% 5.6% 19.4% -4.1% -9.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $469,238 $541,238 $672,223 $634,480 $894,548
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 15.3% 24.2% -5.6% 41.0%
Program services revenue 45.9% 19.0% 0.0% 1.9% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.6% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 54.1% 81.0% 92.1% 90.4% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 7.3% 7.7% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $389,492 $511,960 $562,745 $660,388 $578,988
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 31.4% 9.9% 17.4% -12.3%
Personnel 34.8% 27.7% 30.7% 22.0% 22.2%
Professional fees 1.0% 1.6% 0.7% 9.3% 19.6%
Occupancy 1.9% 1.4% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 5.6% 14.2% 20.6% 21.6% 54.0%
All other expenses 56.7% 55.1% 47.8% 46.9% 4.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $390,879 $512,730 $563,231 $661,353 $579,507
One month of savings $32,458 $42,663 $46,895 $55,032 $48,249
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $4,413 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $427,750 $555,393 $610,126 $716,385 $627,756

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.8 3.5 5.5 5.5 11.5
Months of cash and investments 3.8 3.5 5.5 5.5 11.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.8 3.5 5.6 4.3 3.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $122,222 $148,496 $258,490 $304,217 $556,204
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $2,584 $2,068 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $13,520 $13,520 $13,520 $13,520 $13,520
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 60.5% 63.1% 66.7% 91.2% 95.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 22.0% 2.2%
Unrestricted net assets $127,559 $156,067 $265,059 $238,186 $182,017
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $362,548
Total net assets $127,559 $156,067 $265,059 $238,186 $544,565

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Founder and Executive Director

Dr. Wayne Anthony Centrone

Dr. Wayne A. Centrone has dedicated his career to serving high risk and marginalized homeless and underserved populations around the world. After finishing a family medicine residency, Dr. Centrone completed a two-year fellowship in Homeless and Underserved Medicine and a Master in Public Health program with a focus on health policy. In addition, Dr. Centrone has also completed a graduate program from the University of Oxford in the delivery of healthcare services to homeless populations. Dr. Centrone has a broad understanding of service delivery to homeless adolescents and young adult populations – presenting at numerous conferences about novel approaches to caring for high-risk vulnerable groups and helping organizations around the country enhance services delivery. In addition to his work domestically, Dr. Centrone is the Executive Director of Health Bridges International, Inc. and works extensively in global health and social outreach.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Health Bridges International, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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Health Bridges International, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Health Bridges International, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Dean Boyer

Canonical, Inc.

Term: 2022 - 2027


Board co-chair

Mr. Benjamin Grass

Innovation Law Lab

Term: 2022 - 2027

Lee Centrone

Benesys, Inc.

Margaret Hendrix

Churchill Financial

Stephen Manning

Immigration Law Firm

Robert Gehringer

Children's Hospital of Wisconsin

Dean Boyer

Canonical/Ubuntu

Monte Roulier

Community Initiatives

Patrick Flanagan

District Attorney of Oreogn

Lisa Werkmeister-Rozas

University of CT

Jessica Hitchcock

Mind Matters, PC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.