PLATINUM2023

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

CAMP is about community

aka COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT   |   San Pedro, CA   |  http://www.campla.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

EIN: 20-8542566


Mission

CAMP’s mission is to substantially reduce animal shelter euthanasia and intake by providing high quality, low-cost veterinary services to underserved communities in the Los Angeles area.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Ms. Zoey Knittel

Main address

957 N. Gaffey Street

San Pedro, CA 90731 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Clinico

Spay Neuter Project of Los Angeles

EIN

20-8542566

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Animal population control

Veterinary medicine

Population served info

Adults

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Veterinary Services (D40)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CAMP is working to end the euthanasia of pets in our Los Angeles shelter system. Since opening our doors in 2007, we have helped to cut in half the number of pets being killed in our local city shelters. Additionally we are aiming to make veterinary care affordable and accessible to all pet owners in the Los Angels area, addressing equity issues of access.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Affordable Spay/Neuter

High quality, low cost spay/neuter services.
Each clinic sterilizes 30-40 animals per day, five days per week, 51 weeks per year. Total projected spay and neuter surgeries per year is 25,000+.  Clients are charged a fraction of the actual cost of surgery. CAMP clinics are supported by grants and donations. By providing these services in targeted areas, Mission Hills, Los Angeles and San Pedro we help reach the goal of reducing shelter intake and eliminating euthanasia of healthy animals.

Population(s) Served

Our community animal medicine clinics provide services to over 32,000 animals annually. Through our clinics we are able to improve the quality of life of underserved Angeleno populations by making veterinary care accessible and affordable.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CAMP's Kitten Lifesaving Program saved 3,000 kittens from shelter euthanasia in the its first three years of operation. The program was established in 2016 and currently saves over 1,000 orphaned kittens annually.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CAMP offers training in high-quality, high-volume spay/neuter (HQHVSN) surgical and clinical techniques. We recognize the need for our colleagues to have these types of professional experiences in order to build confidence and feel competent in the surgery suite.

This CE accredited program has the following goals:
- To introduce veterinary professionals (surgeons, nurses, etc) to the principles and methods of HQHVSN.
- To give veterinarians a range of spay/neuter surgical procedures and ample “table time” to practice the repetition needed to build a strong surgical skillset.
- To provide veterinary nurses and final year nurse students the opportunity to practice hands-on HQHVSN clinical techniques one-on-one with our experienced staff.
- To encourage our veterinary community to seek out professional opportunities in HQHVSN surgery, non-profit veterinary wellness, animal shelter medicine and animal welfare.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Affordable Spay/Neuter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since CAMP was formed (under Clinico) in 2007 we have performed over 269,000 spay/neuter surgeries.

Number of vaccines administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Animal Medicine

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of pets microchipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Animal Medicine

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To date, as the largest non-profit spay neuter organization in California, CAMP has proudly spayed and neutered nearly 275,000 animals at our three clinics in South LA, San Pedro, and Mission Hills. CAMP offers our services where pets need us the most: in low income communities where we can make a significant impact on shelter relinquishment rates and provide a compassionate and systematic solution to reduce economic euthanasia.

Our vision is to ensure that spay and neuter services are affordable and accessible to all local pet owners and to create an environment in which animal shelters no longer rely on euthanizing animals as a way of controlling pet population. Our wellness clinics make basic veterinary care accessible and affordable, preventing pets from being deprived of needed medical care due to the financial constraints of their families.
As the largest nonprofit spay and neuter animal welfare organization in California, we are able to significantly reduce shelter intake in Los Angeles and offer a systematic solution to the heartbreaking number of pets euthanized in local shelters. In May 2008, our first permanent clinic location opened in Pico Rivera. This success was soon followed by the launch of our San Pedro location in May 2009 and our Van Nuys location in July 2010. In just seven years, we spayed and neutered 150,000 pets. In 2015, SNP LA spayed and neutered over 21,000 pets and we are on track to provide services for another 20,000 pets in need this year.
Our Wellness Program, launched in 2012 at our Pico Rivera clinic, has already made a striking impact in the local community. Last year, we saw patients for a wide range of health issues including: dental cleaning, de-worming, eye conditions, and infections. We have also expanded the Wellness Program to San Pedro and Van Nuys with much success.
Our comprehensive approach to animal welfare and advocacy consists of four program areas: Affordable Spay and Neuter, Low Cost Wellness Program, Low Cost Vaccine Clinics Program, and Community Outreach and Animal Welfare Advocacy Program. Our three clinics are strategically located in Los Angeles communities with a high shelter intake and a low median household income: Pico Rivera, San Pedro, and Van Nuys.

As the largest nonprofit spay and neuter animal welfare organization in California, we are able to significantly reduce shelter intake in Los Angeles and offer a systematic solution to the heartbreaking number of pets euthanized in local shelters. In May 2008, our first permanent clinic location opened in Pico Rivera. This success was soon followed by the launch of our San Pedro location in May 2009 and our Van Nuys location in July 2010. In just seven years, we spayed and neutered 150,000 pets. In 2015, SNP LA spayed and neutered over 21,000 pets and we are on track to provide services for another 20,000 pets in need this year.

SNP LA OBJECTIVES:
1. Reduce Shelter Intake and Animal Euthanasia

a. Provide High Volume Spay/Neuter Services to Reduce Shelter Intake:
Four to five million dogs and cats are euthanized at shelters every year around the country. Like other shelters nationally, Los Angeles shelters are unable to care for animals for an extended period of time due to overcrowding and cost, resulting in euthanasia of healthy and highly adoptable animals. From recent data, in 2013 in the Los Angeles area, 50,000 animals were taken to local shelters, with 9,000 of that number euthanized. Three of our city's five shelters are located in low-income neighborhoods and impound 75% of all animals.
When low-income pet owners have access to affordable spay/neuter services, they are not forced into the untenable position of having unwanted litters and then surrendering those kittens and puppies to animal shelters, with euthanasia as a highly probable fate, or abandoning their pets to the streets. It is impossible to determine how many stray dogs and cats live in the United States; however, according to the ASPCA, estimates for cats alone range up to 70 million.

b. Improve Pet Behavior to Reduce Shelter Intake:
An important, often overlooked benefit of spay and neuter is the significant reduction of undesirable pet behaviors. A spayed or neutered animal makes a better companion pet, able to focus her or his attention and affection on their family, rather than being driven by hormones to reproduce. Unspayed and unneutered pets are much more likely to engage in undesirable or dangerous behavior, such as destroying household furnishings, soiling the house, or attacking other animals or people. Intact male dogs are seven times more likely, and intact female dogs are ten times more likely, to bite. Also, spay/neuter substantially reduces a dog's and cat's desire to leave home in search of a mate.
Due to these behavioral problems, a pet owner with an intact pet often surrenders their pet to the shelter or simply loses them to the streets. 80% of the adult dogs and cats that enter many shelters are unspayed and unneutered.

c. Provide Efficient, High Quality Services:
While our prices are low, we offer exceptionally high-quality service. Our mortality rate is significantly below industry standards. Offering excellent veterinary care at an affordable cost is our critical strategic focus, as the animals' wellbeing is our top priority.
Our clinics were designed to complete a high volume of surgeries each day. Our efficiency is not only a result of the practices in place but outstanding leadership and expertise of the staff. The results are that we complete approximately 2,000 spay/neuter surgeries each month across our three clinics.

Financials

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.40

Average of 1.09 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.4

Average of 1.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 16% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$33,949 $164,175 $177,800 $314,480 $264,947
As % of expenses -1.1% 4.8% 4.8% 7.7% 6.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$43,249 $157,155 $167,421 $297,538 $249,194
As % of expenses -1.4% 4.6% 4.5% 7.3% 5.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,358,595 $3,198,274 $3,907,685 $4,383,125 $4,693,085
Total revenue, % change over prior year 7.2% -4.8% 22.2% 12.2% 7.1%
Program services revenue 67.4% 77.7% 69.2% 80.0% 82.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 32.6% 22.3% 30.8% 20.0% 18.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,026,819 $3,399,824 $3,729,885 $4,068,645 $4,428,138
Total expenses, % change over prior year -4.2% 12.3% 9.7% 9.1% 8.8%
Personnel 55.1% 59.4% 54.9% 64.2% 69.4%
Professional fees 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2%
Occupancy 2.7% 3.9% 2.2% 1.0% 1.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 41.9% 36.4% 42.7% 34.5% 29.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,036,119 $3,406,844 $3,740,264 $4,085,587 $4,443,891
One month of savings $252,235 $283,319 $310,824 $339,054 $369,012
Debt principal payment $168 $0 $0 $19,827 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $32,529 $0 $39,621
Total full costs (estimated) $3,288,522 $3,690,163 $4,083,617 $4,444,468 $4,852,524

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.9 3.4
Months of cash and investments 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.9 3.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -1.7 -0.9 -0.3 0.5 1.2
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $94,354 $53,576 $55,745 $289,126 $1,257,894
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $446,267 $185,823 $136,208 $85,046 $87,974
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $418,153 $418,153 $450,682 $464,334 $503,954
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 96.7% 98.4% 93.6% 94.5% 90.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 109.2% 199.6% 139.2% 50.9% 68.1%
Unrestricted net assets -$419,087 -$261,932 -$94,511 $203,027 $452,221
Temporarily restricted net assets $365,725 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $365,725 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets -$53,362 -$261,932 -$94,511 $203,027 $452,221

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Zoey Knittel

Zoey Knittel serves as the Community Animal Medicine Project’s Executive Director, overseeing the organization’s management, programs and development. Zoey joined CAMP in its infancy and immediately developed internal management procedures and participated in the strategic planning process defining CAMP’s long term goals and vision. With over ten years of development and non-profit management experience, Zoey successfully developed CAMP’s comprehensive fundraising plans which serve as a launch pad for the organization’s complex operations. She also serves as CAMP’s external spokesperson to raise awareness about under-served populations as well as to ensure CAMP continues to meet the needs of the ever-changing Los Angeles community. Zoey previously served as the managing director of a non-profit literary arts foundation and her award-winning writing has been widely published. Her screenplays have been produced by Rock The Vote for MTV, her short films premiered at the Sundance.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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COMMUNITY ANIMAL MEDICINE PROJECT INC

Board of directors
as of 01/25/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Laurie Straten

No Affiliation

Jeffrey Fritz

No Affiliation

Charles Bradley

No Affiliation

Noel Jackson

Jeffrey Kardatzke

Lisa Ishimaru

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.