PLATINUM2023

Casita Copan Inc

Breaking the cycle of child abandonment

aka Casita Copan   |   Pittsburgh, PA   |  www.casitacopan.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Casita Copan Inc

EIN: 46-1412135


Mission

To prevent child abandonment by nurturing orphaned and abandoned children and supporting single mothers. Casita Copan serves children and families in Copán Ruinas, Honduras.

Ruling year info

2013

Acting Executive Director

Ms. Daysi Ramirez

Main address

2515 Banksville Road #1039

Pittsburgh, PA 15216 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-1412135

Subject area info

Child care

Single parent support

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Single parents

People of Central American descent

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Child Day Care (P33)

Single Parent Agencies/Services (P42)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children's Center

Casita Copan is a "home away from home" for the children of single mothers who are trying to work their way out of poverty. Casita Copán provides a caring, nurturing environment designed to meet the unique physical, social, and developmental needs of each child we serve, while offering support for moms in professional development, education, parenting skills, and more. Our goal is to create more than just a daycare center. We are building an extended family where both children and their mothers feel connected, supported, and respected.

Our children come from backgrounds of extreme poverty, and in many cases, they have seen more of “real life” than seems appropriate at their age. In a country that struggles with unemployment, corruption, and extremely high rates of violence, it is difficult for children to break out of the cycle of poverty.

Despite these challenges, our children are energetic, charismatic, silly, creative, intelligent, and hopeful about their futures.

Population(s) Served
Families
Single parents
Economically disadvantaged people
People of Central American descent
Students

Our Casitas provide a real home environment for abandoned and orphaned children who cannot be reunited with their families. Each Casita is home to 4-5 children and a full-time Casita mom who dedicates herself to raising the children in her care with love and respect. Each Casita is individualized and special, depending on the interests and personalities of the Casita mom and the children in her care. Through this model, our goal is to develop true family bonds that can help reduce the emotional and social risks that many orphaned and abandoned children face.

Casita Copán oversees the operation of each Casita, ensuring that every child receives adequate and nutritional food, clean water, medical care, positive discipline, respect, and emotional support whenever needed. All children that live in a Casita attend public school and Casita Copán Children’s Center for lunch and either a before-school or after-school session to participate in tutoring and educational programming.

Population(s) Served
Orphans
Families
People of Central American descent
Children and youth

The teenagers at Casita Copan that are currently attending high school, work as assistants to our staff in order to gain valuable professional skills. Their tasks include, but are not limited to helping with data entry, helping sort files, assisting in the daycare or kitchen, doing minor repairs to our home, making sure their spaces are organized and neat... even helping take photos and videos! Basically, they learn how to perform the daily jobs that help an organization or company run.

In doing these tasks, Practicantes are not only preparing for adulthood, but are also gaining valuable experience that will distinguish them from other candidates in the work market, and guaranteeing a financial stipend that they themselves manage for their schooling and personal expenses.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents

The Mercadito Program was born out of the need to give single mothers a way to support their families during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through Mercadito, our moms learned all they could about cooking, baking, designing colorful bracelets, sowing and many other ways to actively generate income through their own micro-businesses.

For about two years, Mercadito helped single mothers grow professionally. When the pandemic diminished and they went back to work, we decided to redirect the focus of the program and teach the same things to our youth. This way we are ensuring the next generation of business owners and entrepreneurs are ready to start their businesses and create a more prosperous Copan.

Population(s) Served

Coronavirus had a deep effect in Honduras, and we still don't know how bad things really are. In education, over 1.5 million students were left without classes for almost 2 years.

Schools completely shut down, and the classroom became virtual, something that millions of families could not afford or had very little access to the internet. As a result, enrollment rates plummeted and an educational crisis/nightmare began.

Children that should've been learning how to divide, could barely add 1 + 1.

Our Close the Gap program pretends to give children the 1-on-1 tutoring that they need to learn basic arithmetic, reading comprehension, and fine motor skills involved in writing. Our experienced educator travels every day to the Juan Ramon Cueva public school to teach them with patience and understanding.

To make sure that the students are focused and healthy, Casita provides each of them with a healthy and nutritious snack that will aid their developing bodies and brains.



Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Children and youth
People of Central American descent
At-risk youth
Children and youth
People of Central American descent
At-risk youth
Children and youth
People of Central American descent
At-risk youth
Children and youth
People of Central American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes 15 mothers, 9 children in our foster care program, 26 children in our daycare program, and 40 children in our school-based program

Number of students per teacher during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Children's Center

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

"Casitas" - Foster Care Homes

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of foster youth who obtained employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children in foster care who have stable placements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

"Casitas" - Foster Care Homes

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to prevent child abandonment in Copán Ruinas by creating a network of social services designed to support single mothers, provide loving care for at-risk children, and build individualized homes to care for orphaned children based on a foster care model.

Casita Copan provides more than just a shelter for orphaned and abandoned children. We opened family-style living environments with child-focused care that is individualized and respects a child's right to identity and privacy. Casita Copán employs well-trained and caring staff, provides clean and safe living conditions, guarantees clean water, nutritious food, and access to health care, maintains a strong community connection, and remains transparent so that we can strive to always improve our services.

Through this model of truly child-focused care, our goal is to cultivate each child's strengths, creativity, and identity to prepare them for a productive, healthy, and happy future.

In order to achieve our goals, we are focused on developing the following core programs:

Childcare Center - In September 2012, Casita Copan started its first program, a childcare center for single moms that serves at-risk children ages birth to ten. Our childcare center provides daily care, educational support, food, vitamins, clothing, and medical care to children who live in extreme poverty.

Homes for Orphaned Children – We were successful in implementing our Casitas program, which consists of creating homes for orphaned and abandoned children. Instead of building a large-scale residential facility, we created homes or “casitas," long-term living arrangements that resemble a real family. Each “casita" houses one “mom" (a trained childcare professional), and up to five children of varying ages. The “mom" runs the “casita" just like a real home, providing love and support to the children in her care. Through this model of individualized care, we are hoping to develop true family bonds that can help reduce the emotional and social risks that many orphaned and abandoned children face in institutional care facilities. Casita Copán oversees the operation of the “casitas," ensuring that every child receives adequate and nutritious food, clean water, medical care, education, and emotional support.

Education & Life-Skills Support for Moms – Single mothers in Honduras face daily risks of malnutrition, early pregnancy, illiteracy, domestic abuse, sexual violence, and chronic poverty. Lack of access to health resources and education further compounds these risks. Casita Copán provides the first step in supporting women in poverty: affordable and quality childcare. We are also continually looking for how else we can help the women improve their lives.

Casita Copan is a new organization but is building a solid base of support in the Copan Ruinas community which will lead to organizational effectiveness and sustainability. We employ a model of local and international fundraising to maintain our program efficacy while also building community trust and involvement. Our local board of advisers works closely with the Executive Director and U.S. Board of Directors to develop program goals, strategies, and projects that best serve our children and families. We have partnered with other local organizations working in Copan Ruinas, Honduras to further strengthen our visibility and ability to fundraise. We have a knowledgable and extremely talented team of local staff dedicated to improving their own community, and we reach out to our connections and networks to provide any training that is necessary. We are in the process of expanding our networks and building our staff so that we can continue to improve our organization.

Since we opened our daycare center in September 2012, Casita Copan has made a lasting impact on the children and mothers we serve. We now serve 50 at-risk children from the ages of one to 16 years old with healthy food, medical services, educational support, and emotional support in a loving environment. We employ 15 local staff members, 2 of whom are single mothers themselves and their monthly pay is sponsored by international donors. We serve 13 single mothers through our programs. We have solid monthly financial support from our committed sponsors, and we hope to increase this level of support in the coming year. In 2015, we opened our first "casitas" or foster care homes for 13 abandoned children who could not be reunited with their biological families.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.77

Average of 9.87 over 8 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.2

Average of 3 over 8 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 3% over 8 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Casita Copan Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Casita Copan Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Casita Copan Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Casita Copan Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $46,687 $119,239 $22,061
As % of expenses 26.3% 57.9% 10.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $46,687 $118,715 $17,934
As % of expenses 26.3% 57.5% 8.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $224,228 $325,298 $231,487
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 45.1% -28.8%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 8.6% 7.3% 8.5%
All other grants and contributions 91.4% 92.7% 91.4%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.0% 0.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $177,541 $206,059 $209,426
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 16.1% 1.6%
Personnel 52.7% 48.6% 59.9%
Professional fees 1.8% 4.2% 3.5%
Occupancy 8.2% 7.2% 4.6%
Interest 0.0% 1.1% 3.7%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 37.3% 38.9% 28.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $177,541 $206,583 $213,553
One month of savings $14,795 $17,172 $17,452
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $3,858
Fixed asset additions $0 $190,319 $6,946
Total full costs (estimated) $192,336 $414,074 $241,809

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 8.0 7.5 8.2
Months of cash and investments 8.0 7.5 8.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.0 7.5 8.0
Balance sheet composition info 2020 2021 2022
Cash $118,834 $128,461 $143,836
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $1,280 $1,227 $348
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $11,295 $201,614 $208,560
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 92.3% 5.4% 7.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.3% 25.7% 24.2%
Unrestricted net assets $119,401 $238,116 $256,050
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $119,401 $238,116 $256,050

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Acting Executive Director

Ms. Daysi Ramirez

Daysi Ramirez began her role as Acting Executive Director for Casita Coapn in 2023. Daysi has been involved with Casita Copan for nearly eight years, first working as a psychologist, later as a volunteer member of the Board of Directors serving as President, and most recently in her role as Program Director. A trained and certified psycholgist with a Master's Degree in gener-based violence, Daysi brings a wealth of experience and wisdom to her role. Born and raised in Honduras, Daysi strives to improve conditions in her country and is especially passionate about rights for children and women.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Casita Copan Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Casita Copan Inc

Board of directors
as of 09/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mrs. Lynn Krugman

Beth Ann Nyssen

Salem Hospital

Kristen Pierce

Randy Cucerzan

Retail Orphan Initiative

Grecia Gaviria

Carol Brouwer

Mercy Rossi

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability