PLATINUM2023

CONVOY OF HOPE

A driving passion to feed the world.

aka Convoy of Hope   |   Springfield, MO   |  http://www.convoyofhope.org/

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GuideStar Charity Check

CONVOY OF HOPE

EIN: 68-0051386


Mission

Convoy of Hope is a faith-based organization with a driving passion to feed the world through children's feeding initiatives, community outreaches, disaster response and partner resourcing. In partnership with local churches, businesses, civic organizations, and government agencies, Convoy strategically offers help and hope to communities around the world.

Ruling year info

2020

President & CEO

Hal Donaldson

Main address

1 Convoy Drive

Springfield, MO 65802 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0051386

Subject area info

Nutrition

Disasters and emergency management

Farm viability

Food security

Community improvement

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Economically disadvantaged people

Victims of disaster

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Affiliations

See related organizations info

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CHILDREN'S FEEDING - To see lives changed as we promote healthy children and communities that are free from poverty and hunger. AGRICULTURE - Food security is crucial for communities and families around the world. When we help farmers increase the food security of their communities and families, we can play a part in transforming the lives of countless people by lifting them out of dependency. WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT - When women are given the opportunity to generate income, it impacts their families and their country’s economic standing. We want to empower women around the world to make strategic, independent life choices through community-based training and non-traditional micro-enterprise development. DISASTER SERVICES - To serve millions of people affected by natural and man-made disasters every year through partnerships with local churches, businesses, government agencies, other nonprofits, and our incredible donors and volunteers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program Overview

Convoy of Hope feeds millions of people in need in the United States and around the world through children’s nutrition initiatives, citywide outreaches, disaster response and partner resourcing.

In 29 years, Convoy of Hope has helped over 230 million people in more than 130 countries. In that time we have also given away over $2 billion worth of food and supplies to people in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

COH provides nutritious meals and monitors the health and growth of childrenin our programs. We implement appropriate sustainability programs based on the needs represented in each country.

By providing nutrient-dense school meals, COH helps students obtain approximately 30% of their daily nutritional requirements. In tandem with food provision, COH conducts educational training for teachers, local leaders, and others in community. Students also learn about the importance of a daily bath, oral hygiene, and handwashing.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Through our Agriculture program, Convoy of Hope equips impoverished farmers and families with the skills, tools and seeds to produce life-sustaining crops. Tens of thousands of meals are harvested each year for our Children’s Feeding program, which simultaneously generates income for local farmers.

Population(s) Served
Farmers
Economically disadvantaged people

Convoy of Hope encourages women around the world to realize their value and reach their potential through job training and education. As a result, many enrolled in our Women’s Empowerment program now own a business that allows them to better feed and care for their children.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Convoy of Hope is consistently among the first to respond to disasters around the world.

Monitoring
Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Response Teams monitor developing weather situations, earthquake activity, wildfires and other forms of natural disasters from the team’s Operations Center at our World-Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo.

Response
Disaster response efforts vary depending on the nature of a disaster but typically consist of rotating response teams in the field and the shipment of loads of disaster relief supplies from our World-Distribution Center. Teams in the field distribute relief supplies to storm survivors, coordinate volunteers and assist in cleanup efforts.

Recovery
Long after the media’s spotlight has lifted from a disaster area we continue our work for months, sometimes even years. Our goal is not only to be one of the first organizations to respond to a disaster, but also one of the last to leave.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

America's Top 100 Charities 2021

Forbes

Certified Transparent Seal 2022

Excellence In Giving

Affiliations & memberships

Accord Network 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of loans issued to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Women’s Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This indicator measures the number of individuals receiving seed capital as a result of COH-funding. COH distributes seed capital instead of micro loans, which has proven an effective economic tool.

Number of children receiving Nutrition Plus interventions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Childrens Feeding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes any intervention beyond a supplementary meal, such as deworming medication, micronutrient supplements, nutrition & hygiene education, emotional and spiritual care, agricultural training, etc.

Number of individuals benefitting directly from interventions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Program Overview

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals must be engaged with a project activity or come into direct contact with a set of interventions (goods or services) provided by the project.

Number of children fed regularly.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Adults

Related Program

Childrens Feeding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Children actively attending the local institution for meal distributions. This should include all children the local institution provides a meal to on a regular basis during the program year.

Number of individuals trained in agricultural.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Agriculture

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals receiving training in agriculture best practices as a result of extension methods, formal/informal training, as well as technical assistance activities from COH agronomists or other staff.

Number of women trained in micro-enterprise.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Women’s Empowerment

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women trained in a range of micro-enterprise skills including, but are not limited to: market analysis, financial management, entrepreneurship & business management, and specialized vocational skills.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults

Related Program

Program Overview

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of Meals Distributed across all of Convoy of Hope's Programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CHILDREN'S FEEDING: Reduce Poverty & Hunger in our Program countries through provision of nutritious meals, clean water and healthy living environments.

AGRICULTURE: Increase food security through training of local farmers in our Program countries.

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT: Increase indepenmdent life skills, sustain families and increase econmic sustainability through empowering women.

DISASTER SERVICES: Provide quick and scalable response efforts by providing assistance to individuals, families, and communities in need.

CHILDREN'S FEEDING:
Nutritious Meals - Provide nutritious meals and monitor the health and growth of children each day in our Program countries We implement appropriate sustainability programs based on the needs represented in each country.

Clean & Safe Water - Provide clean water through the collection of water and the distribution of water filtration systems. We also train and equip local partners where safe water is not available.

AGRICULTURE:
Assessment - We use the best tools available to assess the local culture, context of living environments, and the economic situation to understand the real food security needs in the local community.

Education - We educate farmers through curriculum, workshops, and local agronomist and technicians. We strive to take the best science to the farmers. As we make agronomy education available, we also increase the information flow to as many in the community as possible.

Implementation - This program strives to assist farmers in implementing the best agronomic practices in both pilot and large-scale projects.

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT:
Economic Empowerment - Our Economic Empowerment program equips women with financial education, vocational training, cooperative saving groups, and even start-up capital.

Family Health Empowerment - Through our Family Health Empowerment, women attend educational sessions where they are trained in nutrition, health and hygiene, literacy, small-scale community agriculture, and craftsmanship/cooking.

Girls' Empowerment - Empowered Girls brings educational programs to schools and communities. Sessions include contextually appropriate topics such as self-esteem, gender-based violence, and harmful cultural beliefs and practices.

DISASTER SERVICES:
Preparedness - Provide preparedness and resilience training for leaders and volunteers. We work to equip each individual with the wisdom and tools they need to partner with Convoy of Hope during a disaster and help their communities become more prepared before they experience one.

Response - Response efforts vary depending on the nature of a disaster. We work with national, state, and local partners to equip our teams and volunteers with the information they need to provide immediate assistance through the distribution of relief supplies, such as food, clean water, hygiene kits and other needed items.

Recovery - our teams utilize various initiatives, including organizing volunteers in debris removal and cleanup, distribution of building materials, income generation projects, agricultural training, and assisting in the rebuilding process.

CHILDREN'S FEEDING: In country staff, warehousing and distribution. World-wide Logistics and Distribution Center.

AGRICULTURE: In country staff. Content experts in Horticulture and Soil Sciences

WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT: In country staff. Established training curriculum in Financial Education, Vocational Training, Cooperative Savings Groups.

DISASTER SERVICES: Monitoring of weather and natural disaster events, as well as the ever changing climate of conflict and economic situations all around the world. State of the art equipment used in a response: (Semi trucks, skid-steers, mobile kitchen, mobile showers, flat bed trailers, etc.)

To date, Convoy of Hope Has:
1. Distributed Over 582,863,008 Meals
2. Mobilized Over 872,022 Volunteers
3. Feed Over 465,000 Children Daily
4. Work In 26 Program Countries
5. Responded To Over 552 Disasters (Domestic & International)
6. Distributed Over $1,712,003,114 of GIK

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

22.36

Average of 4.97 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.6

Average of 1.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

25%

Average of 26% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

CONVOY OF HOPE

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

CONVOY OF HOPE

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

CONVOY OF HOPE

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of CONVOY OF HOPE’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $14,608,046 $8,436,878 $13,622,415 $32,303,470 $67,427,190
As % of expenses 9.3% 5.0% 7.2% 9.5% 18.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $13,661,378 $7,230,114 $12,629,887 $31,291,310 $66,172,745
As % of expenses 8.7% 4.3% 6.6% 9.1% 18.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $175,079,580 $175,074,452 $194,826,293 $365,004,528 $435,592,269
Total revenue, % change over prior year 28.8% 0.0% 11.3% 87.3% 19.3%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.1% 0.3% 0.3% 0.2%
Government grants 0.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.9%
All other grants and contributions 98.8% 99.4% 99.3% 98.7% 97.5%
Other revenue 0.5% 0.4% 0.4% 1.0% 1.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $156,985,398 $167,785,335 $189,506,257 $341,736,032 $363,245,529
Total expenses, % change over prior year 7.4% 6.9% 12.9% 80.3% 6.3%
Personnel 8.0% 8.8% 9.3% 6.2% 6.9%
Professional fees 3.8% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 1.3%
Occupancy 0.4% 0.7% 0.1% 0.0% 0.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 36.1% 82.3% 81.0% 89.3% 87.7%
All other expenses 51.7% 5.8% 7.2% 1.9% 3.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total expenses (after depreciation) $157,932,066 $168,992,099 $190,498,785 $342,748,192 $364,499,974
One month of savings $13,082,117 $13,982,111 $15,792,188 $28,478,003 $30,270,461
Debt principal payment $2,952,620 $266,909 $230,986 $0 $7,874,251
Fixed asset additions $2,747,211 $0 $0 $12,098,193 $12,175,250
Total full costs (estimated) $176,714,014 $183,241,119 $206,521,959 $383,324,388 $414,819,936

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Months of cash 2.0 2.0 2.5 1.9 0.6
Months of cash and investments 2.0 2.3 3.4 2.5 3.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.4 1.9 2.7 2.4 3.9
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Cash $25,521,773 $28,550,171 $39,965,760 $55,180,620 $16,708,627
Investments $144,804 $3,747,929 $13,024,711 $15,643,426 $80,964,750
Receivables $360,998 $611,584 $584,936 $444,487 $705,098
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $20,557,433 $20,490,297 $13,607,101 $25,558,652 $37,089,468
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 43.4% 49.2% 48.2% 29.0% 21.7%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 8.8% 6.0% 18.8% 19.5% 2.7%
Unrestricted net assets $28,553,119 $35,783,233 $48,413,120 $79,704,430 $145,877,175
Temporarily restricted net assets $19,085,786 $19,087,386 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $183,484 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $19,085,786 $19,270,870 $12,359,726 $4,282,668 $10,000,259
Total net assets $47,638,905 $55,054,103 $60,772,846 $83,987,098 $155,877,434

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President & CEO

Hal Donaldson

Convoy of Hope was founded in 1994 by the Donaldson family. Their inspiration for starting the organization can be traced back to the many people who helped their family after their father, Harold, was killed by a drunk driver in 1969. Today, more than 230 million people have been served throughout the world by Convoy of Hope. We are proud that we work through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits to provide help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

CONVOY OF HOPE

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

CONVOY OF HOPE

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

CONVOY OF HOPE

Board of directors
as of 01/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Aaron Cole

Senior Pastor — Life Church

Term: 2020 -


Board co-chair

Court Durkalski

CEO, Truline Industries

Court Durkalski

Truline Industries

Dominick Garcia

Law Offices of Dominick A. Garcia

Randy Hurst

AGWM

Brad Trask

Brighton Assembly of God

Tom Carter

Cardiothoratic Surgeon

Aaron Cole

Life Church

Cheryl Jamison

Eastridge Church

Klayton Ko

First Assembly

Kay Logsdon

Noble/Food Channel

Kirk Yamaguchi

Canyon View Church

Sam Huddleston

Northern California & Nevada District Assemblies of God

Telvin Jeffries

Careergistics

Sherilynn Tounger

U.S. Embassy

Lindsay Howard

Commercial Roofers

Rich Nathan

Vineyard Columbus

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/2/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/20/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser