PLATINUM2024

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

We're on a nutrition mission

Irvine, CA   |  FeedOC.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

EIN: 32-0362611


Mission

Our Mission In collaboration with our partners, we provide dignified, equitable and consistent access to nutritious food, creating a foundation for community health. Our Vision An Orange County with food and nutritional security for all.

Notes from the nonprofit

As we continue to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic and the economy slowly improves, tens of thousands of people in our community remain underemployed or out of work and are struggling to make ends meet. It is only through your support that we can continue to provide dignified, equitable, and consistent access to nutritious food to those in need in Orange County. On behalf of our Partner Network, Board of Directors, dedicated volunteers and staff, and all those we serve, we thank you. Please contact Second Harvest to learn more about our work and how you can get involved – (949) 653-2900 or visit our website at www.feedoc.org.

Ruling year info

2012

CEO

Claudia Keller

Main address

8014 Marine Way

Irvine, CA 92618 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

32-0362611

Subject area info

Human services

Food banks

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

(Son)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of Second Harvest Food Bank is, in collaboration with our partners, to provide dignified, equitable and consistent access to nutritious food, creating a foundation for community health. Food insecurity is surprisingly prevalent in every city in Orange County. In FY20023 we served an average of 393,000 food-insecure people per month and distributed 36.3 million pounds of food.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mobile Pantry

Mobile Pantries provide fresh produce and other nutritious foods directly to families and individuals who struggle to make ends meet. Mobile Pantries allow us to bring food into underserved and vulnerable communities where many people face transportation challenges in accessing healthy food.

Population(s) Served
Families

Second Harvest's Senior Hunger Strategy helps meet the needs of one of our county's fastest growing vulnerable populations. Nearly half of seniors cannot afford basic necessities and often have to choose between paying for food, medications or rent. Our strategy, comprised of 2 programs, provides OC’s food-insecure seniors, many of whom suffer from medical conditions, with the nutritious food items, such as meat, produce, and prepared salads, that they need to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

- Senior Grocery Program: Distributes groceries twice a month at approximately 39 partner senior centers and low-income senior apartment complexes throughout Orange County. Following a compassionate, client-choice model, Senior Grocery provides seniors with the nutritious food they need in a community-based, easily accessible setting and enables seniors to select the food items they need, increasing their independence and reducing food wasted.
- Park-It Market: Launched in May 2018, the nation’s first-of-its-kind, full-service, partially refrigerated mobile market serves seniors living on fixed incomes. Called Park-It Market, the custom-built mobile trailer carries about 6,000 pounds of food, including fresh vegetables, fruit, shelf stable foods, and refrigerated items like eggs, cheese, yogurt, milk, meat, and prepared salads. Servicing 11 senior centers and low-income senior apartment complex, it is estimated more than 1 million meals will be distributed through it every year.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

OC is one of the wealthiest counties in this nation, yet 1 in 6 children are at-risk of hunger. Without proper nutrition children find it challenging to focus on learning and studies show that food insecurity leads to higher dropout rates. 49% of children in OC rely on free and reduced-price meals for much of their daily nutritional needs. Our Child Hunger Strategy works to bridge the meal gap for children in low-income areas when they need it most, after school, during school holidays, and during the summer. The distribution model has been temporarily modified to reach as many children as possible while schools are closed due to COVID.

- Kids Cafe: Provides nutritious meals and nutrition education to children 18 and under in low-income communities at after-school and summer program locations.
- Mobile School Pantry: Provides nutritious food directly to struggling children and families in OC through ‘pop-up’ farmer’s market style food distributions.
- Permanent School Pantry: An innovative approach to de-stigmatizing food distributions that provides a dignified, client-centered model to serving food-insecure children and families in a scaled-down food market on or near schools where clients can “shop” for the food their families prefer.
- College Pantry Program: Since an estimated 40% of the college students in OC are food-insecure, we introduced the College Pantry Program in 2019. These on-campus pantries support struggling college students so they can focus on their studies. We currently operate 13 sites, serving about 2,000 unique students each month.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Federally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the CalFresh Outreach Program at Second Harvest increases Orange County’s participation rate in CalFresh, one of the lowest in the state, and provides education, awareness, direct application assistance, and client advocacy through our strategic access points, our network of agency partners, our expanding CalFresh Intern Program, and our food assistance hotline. CalFresh benefits allow people to shop for their own food choices rather than depend on handouts from food bank agencies. In Fiscal Year 2020 this program provided the equivalent of more than 1,600,000 meals for the needy.

Population(s) Served
Families
Families
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2018

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Orange County Business Council 2014

United Way Member Agency 2014

Feeding America 1989

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through our own programming and network of community partners, we feed more than 393,000 people each month.

% of Total Expenses that Go Toward Fundraising and General Management

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Stewardship is a core value and as a result, SHFB is very efficient in the use of donors’ contributions. Our fundraising and general management expenses are less than 7% of total expenses.

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers are for feature articles.

Number of return website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The drop-off in FY20 is due to COVID-19 which necessitated that we drastically cut back on our volunteer opportunities.

Number of press releases developed and distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Ex: churches, shelters, soup kitchens, etc. The # changed due to a reapplication process to ensure orgs with whom we partner meet our distribution & food safety standards, & want to grow with us.

Pounds of food distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Based on our fiscal year (July-June) food pounds distributed. The dramatic increase in FY20 is due to the economic fallout of COVID-19. Success is a reduction in need for our services, not growth.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of Second Harvest's robust, diverse set of hunger-relief efforts is to ensure that families that are experiencing food insecurity, no matter the cause, can have reliable access to nutritious food in their community. Through its network of partners and direct distribution programs, Second Harvest provides food for over 393,000 people every month.


Strategic Initiatives

1. Food Sourcing & Nutrition: secure donations of food and funds for food purchases to provide those in need with consistent access to high-quality nutritious foods including whole fruits and vegetables, eggs, protein, dairy and shelf-stable items
2. Orange County Hunger Alliance: Join forces with CAP OC/Orange County Food Bank and Abound to end hunger, address the root causes of poverty, and recover and repurpose excess food to reduce food waste.
3. Peoples Market create a dignified food market option for high-quality nutritious food at lower-than-retail pricing for working families in low-income, under-served communities
4. Working Farm develop 1 acre farm using above-ground containers to grow top-quality, highly-nutritious greens for those in need
5. Community Art Projects: use the power of art to create awareness of the hunger problem and empower advocacy in the community for the most vulnerable among us.

We are focused on providing the most basic of needs – food. Second Harvest provides consistent access to nutritious food to those in need in the community and, more specifically, to the most vulnerable among them, through our Child Hunger Strategy, including Permanent and Mobile School Pantries, after-school programs, College Pantries, and our Senior Grocery Program. Well-nourished children have better educational outcomes and better prospects for the future. College students can focus on learning and preparing to enter the workforce. Seniors whose nutritional needs are met are likely to be healthier and enjoy living independently for longer. Adults who are food secure can focus their time and energy on supporting themselves and their families and on becoming self-sufficient.

We have a Partner pantries, after-school programs, Permanent School Pantries, senior centers, transitional housing and homeless shelters, who distribute the food we provide in locations in every one of Orange County’s 34 cities.

We are working with like-minded organizations – both non-profit and for-profit – to help alleviate hunger which in turn helps families to achieve financial stability. Through our efforts, our partnerships, and the support of individuals, corporations and other funders, we have been able to feed all who need our help. We continue to reach out to marginalized and vulnerable communities to create awareness of the resources available to them and help them find food distributions in their neighborhoods. Network of more than 300 community partners and programs including houses of worship, school and college

Due to the economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020, 2021 and the continued economic aftermath will stand out historically as unprecedented years of community need and our food banks required emergency food response. Our team anticipated the extraordinary food-insecurity challenges resulting from COVID-19 and efficiently pivoted, quickly reworking distribution center operations, including how we source, process and distribute food. Our team successfully provided 60 million pounds of food in fiscal year 2021, a 41% increase from standard operations the preceding fiscal year.

Even in the throes of COVID, we continued to innovate co-creating in late 2020 the Orange County Hunger Alliance, a partnership with Community Action Partnership of Orange County, the OC Food Bank and Abound Food Care. Its the first time three anti-hunger organizations are pooling resources to end poverty by first ending hunger. We have also launched not one but two farm projects locally, providing nutritious locally grown produce to the pantry network while supporting the local farming economy. We continue to be nimble and flexible as we meet the needs of the community.

As we prepare for our 2023/2024 strategic planning, we are refining our focus on food security as foundational for a healthy community. We are redefining success as a reduction in need for food, not growth, led by consistent access to planned, not situational, nutrition. We are a purpose driven organization committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure all are well fed. Providing dignified, equitable and consistent access to nutritious foods creates a foundation for community health and is a catalyst for societal transformation.


How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.59

Average of 6.33 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.5

Average of 0.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26%

Average of 27% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$49,712 -$351,195 $6,916,964 $10,490,053 $1,584,870
As % of expenses -0.1% -0.6% 8.1% 9.8% 1.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$634,613 -$993,405 $6,187,576 $9,633,068 $638,488
As % of expenses -1.0% -1.6% 7.2% 9.0% 0.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $61,009,496 $62,022,189 $92,087,181 $117,366,378 $91,574,545
Total revenue, % change over prior year 14.8% 1.7% 48.5% 27.5% -22.0%
Program services revenue 4.2% 4.8% 2.6% 6.1% 4.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 95.7% 95.2% 97.4% 94.0% 95.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $61,172,986 $62,297,823 $85,333,329 $106,714,396 $88,974,167
Total expenses, % change over prior year 14.6% 1.8% 37.0% 25.1% -16.6%
Personnel 7.2% 8.6% 7.2% 5.1% 6.1%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.4% 0.4% 0.3% 0.6%
Occupancy 0.6% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 0.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
All other expenses 92.2% 90.5% 92.0% 94.2% 92.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $61,757,887 $62,940,033 $86,062,717 $107,571,381 $89,920,549
One month of savings $5,097,749 $5,191,485 $7,111,111 $8,892,866 $7,414,514
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $863,758 $0 $1,035,772 $1,170,519 $1,351,279
Total full costs (estimated) $67,719,394 $68,131,518 $94,209,600 $117,634,766 $98,686,342

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.5 0.4 1.3 1.9 2.5
Months of cash and investments 0.5 0.4 1.3 1.9 2.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.1 -0.1 0.8 1.6 2.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $2,306,493 $1,934,802 $8,989,340 $16,663,979 $18,888,190
Investments $225,002 $209,411 $206,291 $244,161 $226,995
Receivables $810,055 $695,784 $240,504 $356,620 $775,074
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $15,530,709 $15,950,333 $16,908,273 $17,473,251 $18,656,267
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 34.0% 36.4% 38.2% 38.4% 40.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 4.8% 4.4% 7.7% 5.1% 4.2%
Unrestricted net assets $10,609,313 $9,615,908 $15,803,484 $25,436,552 $26,075,040
Temporarily restricted net assets $4,430,707 $4,702,549 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $196,281 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $4,626,988 $4,702,549 $4,539,437 $4,760,100 $5,770,211
Total net assets $15,236,301 $14,318,457 $20,342,921 $30,196,652 $31,845,251

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Claudia Keller

Claudia Bonilla Keller, an established nonprofit executive, joined Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County as chief mission officer in February 2020 and was named CEO on January 1, 2022. Keller leads all aspects of food bank operations, including outreach to donors, community partners, volunteers and the public to educate, inform and inspire action on Second Harvest’s focus of ensuring that all Orange County residents in need are well fed. Prior to Second Harvest, Keller served as chief program officer for the LA Promise Fund and as senior vice president and executive director of the American Heart Association in Los Angeles. Keller holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from UC Irvine and a master’s degree in Public Administration with a concentration in urban management from Cal State Fullerton. She resides in Placentia.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Kathy Bronstein

KB Bronstein Merchandising

Term: 2022 -

Salman Alam

Western Digital

Kathy Bronstein

KB Bronstein Merchandising

Joe Fuszard

Bank of America

Dan Grable

Goodman North America

David Hasenbalg

City National Bank an RBC Company

Melissa Hill

Albertsons, Vons, Pavilions

Kate Klimow

University of California, Irvine

Brigid Noonan

Society of St. Vincent. de Paul

John Ralls

Community Health

Teddie Ray

Harvester

Katherine Le

Mortgage Service Providers

Jeff Dietrich

PricewaterhouseCoopers

William Doyle

Kerlin Capital Group

Dareen Khatib

Orange County Dept. of Ed.

Manishi Parikh

Wells Fargo Commercial Banking

Bill Schaal

Rutan & Tucker, LLP

Heidi Sirota

Nationwide

Maria Zlidar Richards

Mazda North America

Patrick Finnegan

Disneyland Resport

Bill Koschak

Advancement CFO

Neil Pardasani

Boston Consulting Group

Sunny Reelhorn Parr

Ralphs and Food 4 Less

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/28/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser