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La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Our mission is to enhance the quality of life for adults with chronic mental illness by maintaining a community in which these individuals can live with dignity and independence, as they pursue leisure activities, social relationships, and meaningful work.

aka Lakewood Center   |   Fern Park, FL   |  https://www.lakewoodcenter.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

EIN: 59-1300982


Mission

La Amistad Foundation, Inc.'s mission is to enhance the quality of life for adults with chronic mental illness.  Our goal is to maintain a community in which these individuals have the opportunity to live with dignity and independence, as they pursue leisure activities, social relationships, and meaningful work.

Ruling year info

1972

Principal Officer

Ms. Sarah Summey

Main address

8400 La Amistad Cove

Fern Park, FL 32730 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

La Amistad, Inc.

EIN

59-1300982

Subject area info

Health

Human services

Mental health care

Population served info

Adults

People with psychosocial disabilities

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Health - General and Rehabilitative N.E.C. (E99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Aqua Fitness

Aqua Fitness is designed to improve self-confidence
and maintain cognitive development, motor development and memory capacity
through class participation. It is a planned and structured program that is
tailored to the needs of each resident and encourages a healthy and safe
environment to prosper and develop wellbeing and athletic development. Classes
vary from lap, timed and fun swims. Lakewood’s heated pool extends
participation year round.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Fitness class is tailored to the individuals’ needs in a group setting. Participation helps control weight, improve mood, boost energy and promote better sleep. The class encourages a sense of play while developing and maintaining athletic ability, which helps with balance and coordination.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Like Skills therapy group focuses on topics that enhance the activities of daily living of Lakewood residents. The aim of each group session is to help residents develop cognitive skills, analytical capacities, and interpersonal skills needed to improve their relationships and communication. Participants are encouraged to share personal struggles and weekly challenges, and to express thoughts freely. They also adhere to group norms that they participate in developing and monitoring during group sessions.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Personal Growth and Coping Skills therapy groups provide the residents the opportunity to process their thoughts, feelings, behaviors and reactions to situations as well as learn more effective ways to cope with them. These groups incorporate the techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy, social skills training and role-playing with the aim of increasing residents' awareness of distorted beliefs, objective evaluation of the reality of those beliefs, and an understanding of how their lives and relationships with others are impacted by this.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Stress Management therapy group utilizes a cognitive and behavioral theoretical approach to teach coping skills. The group provides opportunity for discussion and utilizes exercises and handouts aimed at helping residents develop skills to manage anger, frustration and stress. Each week, residents are asked to rate their stress from 1-10 using the Subjective Unit of Distress (SUD) Scale. They are then asked to describe their stress, what skills they use to better manage it and how effective they were in reducing their stress. Each group concludes with a mindfulness, relaxation or breathing exercise and re-administration of the SUD scale.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Music Appreciation offers the residents exposure to a variety of music via the audio presentation of music along with related lecture and discussion. Cultural and ethnic influences as well as the era in which the music being presented originated are considered. Knowledge and awareness of general musical styles and genres will be cultivated in this class. In order to more fully appreciate the individual and universal/interpersonal effects of music in the world, residents are encouraged to consider and share their personal thoughts, feelings and experiences as they relate to the subject of the music being presented.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

The primary goal of the Work Program is to involve residents in meaningful employment on or off the Lakewood campus. Being productive and feeling useful enhances the residents' self-esteem and sense of self worth. Participation is voluntary, but encouraged. Residents have opportunities to work in various jobs at Lakewood, to earn a paycheck, and to contribute to their community. For some residents, the work program is a stepping stone to prepare them for return to mainstream life outside our campus.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Job Club is part of the Work Program that focuses on teaching skills necessary for the resident to successfully do his/her job. It is open to all residents, not just those currently working. Job Club offers the opportunity to learn about employment skills and steps to take to reach one's goal of working. Another aspect of the Work Program is teaching the personal benefits of volunteerism. Lakewood gives residents volunteer opportunities on campus and sponsors community projects that match their talents and interests.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Take Charge group is designed to reinforce positive cognitive messages that enhance self-confidence and self-esteem. With the “wisdom of the group”, daily issues are identified and problems are solved together. Feelings are processed and group members discuss concrete solutions to common problems. Emotions and behaviors are verbalized in an effort to increase self-awareness and gain a perspective to understand how to control various challenges in life.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Don Jack Rotarian of the Year 2020

Lake Mary Rotary

Affiliations & memberships

National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) 1998

Lake Mary Rotary 2018

American Residential Treatment Association 1995

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Job Club

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Job Club offers the opportunity to learn about employment skills and steps to take to reach one's goal of working. Another aspect of the Work Program is teaching the personal benefits of volunteerism.

Number of clients in residential care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We currently have 39 Residents in our care at Lakewood center.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All of our clinical and caregiving staff receives training in trauma informed care to ensure that our residents are receiving the best treatment and care that we can provide.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The success of our program is attained when all residents in need of financial assistance are able to remain in treatment at Lakewood Center. Also, when we can continue to provide treatment and care in a safe and supportive environment that enhances the quality of life for our residents with chronic mental illness. Our goals for the next 3 years are to broaden our spectrum of programs available to our residents; engage in more community involvement and outreach; improve our collaboration with other non-profits in Central Florida; market ourselves more to the community.

At Lakewood Center, our trained 24-hour staff provide a wide range of psychiatric care services along with recreational opportunities, wellness programs, and a Therapeutic Work Program. Our programs vary in the degree of structure and supervision to meet the specific emotional, social, and physical needs of each resident.

Our services include group therapy, crisis counseling, medication monitoring, and individualized treatment planning to help our residents manage the symptoms of their mental illnesses so they can enjoy life to the fullest. The primary goal of our voluntary Therapeutic Work Program is to involve our residents in meaningful work on campus, thus improving the quality of their lives. Lakewood also teaches the benefits of volunteerism and offers volunteer opportunities on campus as well as selecting community projects that match their talents and interests.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.84

Average of 6.87 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12

Average of 9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23%

Average of 24% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of La Amistad Foundation Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $139,339 $7,963 $769,088 $55,496 -$48,708
As % of expenses 5.3% 0.3% 26.7% 2.0% -1.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$51,330 -$184,586 $586,029 -$113,308 -$215,910
As % of expenses -1.8% -6.7% 19.1% -3.8% -7.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,720,531 $2,543,938 $3,580,041 $2,785,900 $2,933,135
Total revenue, % change over prior year -15.1% -6.5% 40.7% -22.2% 5.3%
Program services revenue 89.6% 86.7% 66.8% 85.0% 84.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.7% 0.9% 0.4% 0.1% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 11.0% 0.2% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 9.7% 12.4% 21.8% 14.7% 15.8%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,612,118 $2,566,875 $2,880,007 $2,787,546 $2,821,153
Total expenses, % change over prior year -3.7% -1.7% 12.2% -3.2% 1.2%
Personnel 67.8% 66.9% 66.4% 66.7% 67.9%
Professional fees 1.8% 1.7% 2.5% 1.4% 1.9%
Occupancy 13.8% 13.9% 10.6% 10.8% 11.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.4% 0.9% 0.8% 0.9% 0.0%
All other expenses 16.2% 16.6% 19.7% 20.2% 19.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,802,787 $2,759,424 $3,063,066 $2,956,350 $2,988,355
One month of savings $217,677 $213,906 $240,001 $232,296 $235,096
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $3,020,464 $2,973,330 $3,303,067 $3,188,646 $3,223,451

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 9.2 9.7 11.3 11.5 12.0
Months of cash and investments 10.1 10.7 12.3 12.6 12.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.9 9.1 11.3 11.7 11.3
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $2,009,678 $2,077,352 $2,723,631 $2,663,484 $2,818,551
Investments $185,903 $209,321 $235,152 $256,028 $211,367
Receivables $8,581 $57,842 $52,196 $68,366 $55,207
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $6,901,324 $6,901,324 $6,908,461 $6,957,776 $6,968,657
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 44.8% 47.6% 50.2% 52.3% 54.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.8% 5.1% 4.2% 4.5% 6.4%
Unrestricted net assets $5,748,710 $5,564,124 $6,150,153 $6,036,845 $5,820,935
Temporarily restricted net assets $100,840 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $104,390 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $205,230 $204,790 $160,078 $133,990 $257,610
Total net assets $5,953,940 $5,768,914 $6,310,231 $6,170,835 $6,078,545

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Ms. Sarah Summey

Sarah has over 20 years of experience in healthcare leadership. She earned her Masters in Clinical Psychology at East Tennessee State University and her Masters of Healthcare Administration at Purdue University. She began her behavioral health career as a Residential Counselor at Pasadena Villa where she facilitated therapeutic groups and led therapeutic interventions. She was later promoted to Director of Admissions and Network Operations. Sarah then moved to a consultative role in the rebrand and opening of residential treatment facilities for adults at Promises Behavioral Health. Since then, Sarah worked as the Senior Director of Business Development for Universal Health Services with the responsibility of overseeing strategic planning, business operations, and marketing for Palm Point Behavioral Health and Central Florida Behavioral Hospital. Sarah served on non-profit boards and volunteer committees including NAMI Greater Orlando, AFSP, Peer Support Space, and Volunteer Tennessee.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

La Amistad Foundation Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/01/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Teresa Williams

CEO HomeCare Connect

Bruce Woodruff

Bruce Woodruff & Associates

Teresa Williams

CEO, HomeCareConnect

Bryn Auld

Community Volunteer

Debra McLaren

President, McWilliams Family Foundation

Jordan Smith

Community Volunteer

Stephanie Higgins

Community Volunteer

Noelle Moore

Community Volunteer

Lisa Burrell

Community Volunteer

Sarah Summey

CEO, Lakewood Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data