PLATINUM2024

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Supporting Familes and Professionals in the fight against child abuse

aka SBA   |   Fort Worth, TX   |  www.shakenbaby.org
GuideStar Charity Check

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

EIN: 75-2758611


Mission

Our mission is to provide support for victim families and professionals, prevention of child and elder abuse, and justice for the innocent victims SBA was founded in 1998 on a Fort Worth kitchen table by 3 mothers whose children were victims of Shaken Baby Syndrome, (SBS/AHT) and could find no resources or support. Over the past 23 years, SBA has supported victim families with children in need and those who have died while developing into a nationally recognized forensic training and case consulting agency for professionals in the field of child physical abuse. SBA offers three services: Victim Family Services, Professional Support (Training and Case Consultations) and Prevention Education. (SBS/AHT) Victim Services and Prevention Education are free of charge.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Bonnie Armstrong

Main address

8101 Boat Club Road Suite 240 #154

Fort Worth, TX 76179-3631 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

75-2758611

Subject area info

Public health

Abuse prevention

Victim aid

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Parents

Caregivers

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Victims' Services (P62)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is a subset of Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), the leading cause of death and disability in young children SBS/AHT is caused by a caregiver shaking and/or impacting a child’s head, resulting in brain injury or death. At least 1 in 4 infants who are violently shaken die. The increase in shaking between ages 3 and 6 months, when crying peaks, accords with battering as the main cause of hospitalization and death at this age. Other child physical abuse signs include skin injuries, fractures, abdominal injuries, and burns resulting in pain, permanent injury, and disfigurement. In FY 2022, TX had 182 confirmed child abuse and neglect-related fatalities. Of those, 76 children (40%) died of Physical Abuse (Blunt Force Trauma and Intentional Homicide);111 children (61%) were 3 years and younger. Tarrant had 13 child abuse deaths, ranking 3rd statewide. Harris was #1 with 48, followed by Dallas County with 24. The #1 trigger of SBS/AHT is crying.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Victim Family Support

PURPOSE:
Provide a coordinated system of case management for victim families that is culturally relevant, linguistically accessible, trauma-informed, evidence-based, developmentally, and age/situation appropriate.

We reach families left behind and not served by other programs, including families with a child who has died or with a child abuse survivor with multiple disabilities due to inflicted trauma and brain injury. We help with everything from physical and emotional support to assistance navigating the education, health, and legal systems. We served 248 clients in 2022 free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Families
Adults
Parents
Non-adult children

Professional Support: Sliding Scale
Goal: To provide professionals with tools needed to effectively identify and prosecute abuse cases via:
a. Training: SBA provides a full range of forensic investigative training programs for professionals, including APS, law enforcement, child protection, medical practitioners, first responders, and legal professionals, related to child physical abuse and similar methods of investigating abuse of other physical or cognitive vulnerable populations (e.g., elder abuse). We trained 1388 professionals in 2022.
b. Case Consultation Services: SBA provides case consultations in child physical abuse cases. We target law enforcement and police. Services include case analysis, technical support with crime scene investigation, interviews, timelines, visual aids, and expert witness recommendations. We consulted on 52 cases in 2022.

Since 1999, SBA has trained nationwide and in Canada.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders
Adults
Health

PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT: CASE CONSULTATIONS
GOAL
Provide case consultations to enhance the capacity of child protection, law enforcement, first, and social service agencies in the community to appropriately investigate and respond to cases of confirmed or suspected child abuse for successful case outcomes.

Case consultation services include case analysis, technical support with crime scene investigation, developing interview questions, timelines or visual aids, and recommendations for expert witnesses. Keeping current on the spectrum of our services and actively practicing in each respective discipline has distinguished our multidisciplinary team (MDT) from others in the field. With one phone call, text, or email, any of our constituents, whether a victim family member, law enforcement officer, child advocate, CPS, or legal professional, can access the best resources in the country.

We consulted on 52 cases in 2022.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Infants and toddlers
Victims of crime and abuse

Goal: To reduce the incidence of SBS/AHT through teaching COPE (Crying, Overwhelmed, Pause, Exit), which equips at-risk caregivers with the tools to deal with crying, the #1 trigger for SBS/AHT. We offer free COPE child abuse prevention education to students, childcare staff, and the community. We provide our When Babies Cry DVD (Spanish/ English) to over 2,000 yearly.
Risk factors for SBS/AHT include young parents, unstable families, low socioeconomic status, and uneducated child-care providers. COPE incorporates evidence-informed data to prevent child physical abuse. COPE, a culturally inclusive program taught in English/Spanish is designed for delivery in high schools and communities. COPE is an easy-to-remember acronym that walks current/future caregivers through safe steps to de-escalate stressful caregiving situations: COPE is based on research by Dias et al. showing a 47% reduction in SBS/AHT incidence. COPE provides a structured education covering infant crying patterns, the

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Caregivers
At-risk youth
Adolescent parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of victim families (adults and children) served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Victim Family Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our 2023 goal was to serve 225 families. Victim Family Support is offered free of charge to families.

Number of professionals trained in advanced forensic child abuse investigations to insure successful court outcomes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Professional Support: Training in Advanced Investigations in Child and Elder Abuse

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Funding for child abuse training has been diverted to mass shooting and terrorism training. We have turned down requests for lack of monies.

Number of students, caregivers, and at risk population members trained in how to cope with a crying baby, the #1 trigger of shaken baby syndrome.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Family relationships

Related Program

COPE Child Abuse Prevention Education for At-Risk Populations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Prevention education is offered free of charge.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SBA has the goal of nationally ending Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS/AHT), defined by the CDC as a preventable and severe form of physical child abuse. Our three programs alleviate suffering and cruelty to children by addressing the significant needs of those affected by child physical abuse and Abusive Head Trauma. During COVID, with child abuse and infant deaths rising, SBA assisted first responders and police, walking them through investigations. SBA answered calls and texts from parents on edge, showing them how to cope with a crying baby step-by-step.

SBA is the only agency that counteracts the rising acts of physical violence against children. Our programs alleviate suffering and cruelty to children by addressing the significant needs of those affected by child physical abuse and Abusive Head Trauma. Victim children and families have complex needs: not only support and resources but also affirmation that they can save another innocent victim and family from this horrific nightmare and seek justice. We may meet a family when the abuse occurs, train the police responding to the call, and work with the lawyer to present the case.

Our three programs, Victim Family Services, Professional Support (Training and Case Consultation) for law enforcement, investigators, first responders, and other child welfare professionals, and Prevention Education (SBS and SIDS risk reduction with high school students, childcare providers, and the community), blend those needs.
Our programs respond to these prevention and intervention points:

1. Crying is the #1 trigger for SBS/AHT, followed by potty training, feeding issues, and interrupting adult caregiver activity. (AAP,2019; NCSBS,2019). (Prevention Education)
2. SBS/AHT is an injury in the brain requiring specialized forensic investigative training. There needs to be consistent funding for specialized training. (Professional Support)
3. Families impacted by child physical abuse need medical, emotional, physical, and often financial support. When a child is shaken, the most common perpetrator is the biological father, followed by the moms boyfriend. Mothers may be financially devastated by the spousal income loss. They miss work to care for their severely brain-injured child and the fluctuating needs of siblings. Care may be needed over a lifetime. (Victim Family Services)

Goals 2024 :
1. Support 250 victim family members and survivors.
2. Train 700 professionals virtually and/or in person.
3. Educate 1100 students and 100 community members to cope with a crying baby.
4. Provide 25 case consultations

A. PROGRAMS
SBA programs address the significant needs of those affected by child physical abuse and Abusive Head Trauma. Victim children and families have complex needs: not only support and resources but also some affirmation that they can save another innocent victim and family from this horrific nightmare and seek justice. Our three programs, Victim Family Support, Professional Support (including Forensic Investigative Training and Case Consultation Services), and Prevention Education, blend those needs.

1. Victim Family Support (free of charge)
Goal: Provide a coordinated system of case management for victim families that is culturally relevant, linguistically accessible, trauma-informed, evidence-based, developmentally, and age/situation appropriate. We support families and survivors of SBS/AHT left behind and not served by others, including families with a child who died. We help with everything from financial and emotional support to navigating the education, health, and legal systems. We served 248 clients in 2022

2. Professional Support:
Goal: To provide professionals with tools needed to effectively identify and prosecute abuse cases via:
a. Training: SBA provides a full range of forensic investigative training programs for professionals, including law enforcement, CPS, APS, first responders, and medical and legal professionals, related to child physical abuse and abuse of other physically or cognitively vulnerable populations (e.g., elder abuse). We trained 1388 professionals in 2022.
b. Case Consultation Services: SBA provides case consults in child physical abuse cases. We target law enforcement and police. Services include case analysis, technical support with crime scene investigation, interviews, timelines, visual aids, and expert witness recommendations. We consulted on 52 cases in 2022. 3. Prevention Education: (free of charge)
Goal: To reduce the incidence of SBS/AHT by equipping caregivers with the tools to deal with crying, the #1 trigger for SBS/AHT. We prevent child abuse by educating at-risk populations and the community. We trained 882 students in 2022.

B. COLLABORATION
1. SBA partnered in 2019 with One Safe Place to share office space, counselors, training, and connections to 42 other family violence agencies. Through active partnerships with CPS, APS, law enforcement, Cooks CARE Team, CASA of Tarrant, Denton, Dallas Counties, Justins Place, prosecutors, and agencies, we identify child abuse victims and families who need Victim Family Support services. SBA coordinates with multiple community agencies for needed victim and financial support, training, and consults.
2. In 02.2021, SBA received a multiyear $299,000 grant from the Fort Worth Crime Prevention and Control District to reduce violent crime, specifically Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), by providing in high crime areas a.) SBAs COPE education to equip parents with skills to cope with a crying baby and b.) advanced child abuse forensic

In our 23-year existence, we have faced and overcome financial challenges. Sustainability has been examined in every budget line and is a high priority for SBA. Our robust plan addresses the pandemic losses without sacrificing mission. To diversify our revenues, we will amplify our staff, board, and advisory board capacity to fundraise; build new foundation relationships, cultivate corporate sponsors and individual donors' support, and continue our annual fundraising appeal process.

Each year since SBAs 1998 incorporation, programs have met and exceeded service goals due to increased demand from victims and professionals. With COVID, a growing awareness of SBA through word of mouth, professional contacts, collaboration, and website traffic produced an overwhelming service demand. All services are assessed, assigned and/or referred out as appropriate.

1. SBA exceeded all 2022 program goals:
a. Provide support to a minimum of 200 victim family members. Outcome: 248 victim family members served.
b. Train 1300 professionals, 600 middle and high school students, and 100 community members. Outcome: 1388 adults and 822 students trained. Of the 822 students trained in COPE, (Crying, Overwhelmed, Pause, Exit):
1. 100% created a crying plan and signed a promise letter never to shake a baby.
2. Pretest scores averaged 56 of 100%, while post-test averaged 90%, indicating knowledge gained about SBS/AHT risk factors and crying resolution.
c. Provide at least 50 case consultations: Outcome: 52 case consultations provided.



SBA saw a specific need, developed partnerships with stakeholders across the state and nation, and implemented a plan to address child physical abuse in the State of Texas and beyond. Over the past 24 years, SBA has supported families in need while developing into a nationally recognized forensic training and case consulting agency for professionals in the field of child physical abuse.

SBA saw a specific need, developed partnerships with stakeholders across the state and nation, and implemented a plan to address child physical abuse in the State of Texas and beyond. Over the past 24 years, SBA has supported families in need while developing into a nationally recognized forensic training and case consulting agency for professionals in the field of child physical abuse.
Listening to our constituents needs, focusing on mission-driven program needs, and using our position as the only agency dedicated solely to the prevention of physical violence against children has brought us unheralded new opportunities.
1. In 03.2023, SBA played a pivotal background role in the James Staley trial held in Fort Worth. Staley was convicted of capital murder of his two-year-old son, Wilder. SBA attended the trial daily. We provided the mother with Victim Support Services, prepped the prosecutor, and built a new doll for demonstrative evidence.
2. In Feb. 2021, SBA received a multiyear $299,000 grant from the Fort Worth Crime Prevention and Control District to reduce violent crime, specifically Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), by providing a.) SBA’s COPE education in high risk areas to equip parents with skills to cope with a crying baby, the #1 trigger of AHT, and b.) advanced child abuse forensic investigation training for law enforcement and other professionals to improve case outcomes. The grant funds SBA's Educator dedicated to teaching our COPE, our evidence-based, prevention education program to high-risk groups including students and the community. As statistics reflect an increase in child abuse in the Hispanic population, this group is a major program focus.
3. An unprecedented collaboration among the Senior Source Elder Financial Center, SBA, the Dallas Probate Courts, elder law attorneys and the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center (DCAC) produced the first “Crimes Against the Elderly and People with Disabilities” on 09.30 and 10.01.21 at DCAC. This was a natural progression for our forensic training since children, the elderly, and people with disabilities are all vulnerable victims. COVID enhanced that vulnerability. Our second conference was held 10.20 to 10.21.22 at DCAC.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Clients may lack technology to provide feedback. SBA must respect client confidentiality.

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.18

Average of 0.96 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.2

Average of 0.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 10% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$58,273 -$16,013 $82,728 -$135,397 $86,538
As % of expenses -11.8% -2.7% 13.6% -19.8% 11.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$62,520 -$20,564 $78,409 -$140,004 $82,748
As % of expenses -12.5% -3.4% 12.8% -20.3% 11.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $437,069 $580,519 $689,649 $550,083 $828,477
Total revenue, % change over prior year -30.6% 32.8% 18.8% -20.2% 50.6%
Program services revenue 15.7% 6.0% 1.5% 6.7% 5.6%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 17.7% 13.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 66.6% 81.0% 98.4% 93.3% 94.4%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $495,342 $596,532 $606,921 $685,480 $741,939
Total expenses, % change over prior year -9.4% 20.4% 1.7% 12.9% 8.2%
Personnel 18.5% 22.7% 22.5% 21.9% 18.1%
Professional fees 60.8% 55.2% 63.6% 62.4% 63.8%
Occupancy 2.6% 3.4% 3.2% 3.5% 2.9%
Interest 0.2% 0.9% 0.7% 0.6% 0.1%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 17.9% 17.9% 9.9% 11.7% 15.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $499,589 $601,083 $611,240 $690,087 $745,729
One month of savings $41,279 $49,711 $50,577 $57,123 $61,828
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $21,736 $38,095
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $540,868 $650,794 $661,817 $768,946 $845,652

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.4 0.4 2.2 0.4 1.2
Months of cash and investments 0.4 0.4 2.2 0.4 1.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.0 -0.4 1.3 -1.3 0.2
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $15,484 $21,442 $110,722 $24,068 $76,317
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $26,920 $15,181 $92,274 $34,359 $9,506
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $33,262 $35,798 $35,798 $37,157 $38,356
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 63.4% 71.6% 83.7% 93.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 78.4% 118.2% 66.3% 214.0% 84.7%
Unrestricted net assets $11,921 -$8,643 $70,426 -$69,578 $13,170
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $11,921 -$8,643 $70,426 -$69,578 $13,170

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Bonnie Armstrong

Bonnie Armstrong is Co-Founder and Executive Director of The Shaken Baby Alliance. She became ED In 2000, when she served as the Lead Consultant for the Serious Physical Child Abuse and SIDS Advanced Investigation Program and Regional Training Institutes. Ms. Armstrong has written numerous articles for regional publications related to child welfare issues. Bonnie and her team provide case consultation services for legal personnel and law enforcement on child physical abuse and child fatality cases in all aspects of the case from offense through prosecution and lectures at various training institutes and conferences nationwide. In 2019, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Gunderson National Child Protection Training Center. She was the first keynote child abuse speaker at the American Academy of Forensic Sciences conference in April 2019. She received a BS in Education from Tarleton State University.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

SHAKEN BABY ALLIANCE

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Beth Sedlet

Homemaker, Data Manager, Never Shake a Baby Arizona

Term: 2019 - 2024

Craig Futterman

Inova Fairfax Hospital for Children, Falls Church, VA

Carl Coats

Grapevine Police Dept., Grapevine, TX

Beth Sedlet

Homemaker, Phoenix, AZ

Andrea Adelmann

Founder, Compass High School , mother of SBS survivor

Heather Downs

Child Advocate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data