PLATINUM2023

Beyond Hunger

Harnessing the power of communities to end hunger

aka Formerly Oak Park River Forest Food Pantry   |   Oak Park, IL   |  www.GoBeyondHunger.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Beyond Hunger

EIN: 27-2018997


Mission

Harnessing the power of communities to end hunger

Ruling year info

2010

Chief Executive Officer

Michele Zurakowski

Main address

848 Lake Street

Oak Park, IL 60301 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Oak Park River Forest Food Pantry

EIN

27-2018997

Subject area info

Food banks

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

While the U.S. economy continues to recover from the pandemic, millions of Americans are left behind. Even with earned income/wages, public benefits, and federal food stamp or child nutrition programs, many people still lack the necessary resources to feed their families. This reality is reflected in the food insecurity rate in Chicago, where 1 in 6 families do not have the resources to buy the food their families need. Hunger and health are profoundly interconnected, and together they play a critical role in the life expectancy disparity in Chicago.  Systemic racism and decades of disinvestment have caused a 20-year life expectancy gap between individuals who live in affluent zip codes compared to those living in underserved communities. Advanced age and disabilities increase food insecurity and compound health disparities in these communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Beyond Hunger

We provide hunger-relief programming and services to 13 zip codes across Cook County, including portions of Chicago and its near-west Suburbs. Our service offerings seek to provide the food, resources, knowledge, and skills people need to live healthy, active lives.

For over 40 years Beyond Hunger has created solutions to end hunger at every stage of life through comprehensive programs that now include: providing emergency food to families in need, summer meals for kids who lack them when school is out, connecting individuals to valuable benefits like SNAP (“food stamps”), conducting nutrition education and cooking classes to combat chronic illness, and delivering groceries to homebound older adults. Organization-wide, we focus on health and nutrition, and provide food that nourishes and sustains that families love.

In FY2022 Beyond Hunger served over 42,000 individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Client Choice Award 2011

Greater Chicago Food Depository

Quality Performance Award 2011

Greater Chicago Food Depository

Investing in Illinois Award 2010

AT&T

President's Award 2009

Oak-Leyden Developmental Services, Inc.

Best Fiscal Management Award 2009

Greater Chicago Food Depository

Green Award 2023

Climate Ready Oak Park

Gold Level Recognition 2022

Illinois Nutrition Education Programs

Community Health Equity Partner Award 2021

Rush's Office of Community Health Equity and Engagement

Affiliations & memberships

Good Food Purchasing Program Pledge 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All individuals served across programs.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is representative of Facebook Page likes.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Beyond Hunger recognizes that communities know what they need. Together, we create collaborative solutions for hunger and nutrition security that forge a more racially equitable food system.

Beyond Hunger harnesses the power of communities to end hunger. By providing food to people who are hungry, we meet immediate needs, but recognize that social and economic disparities at the root of hunger also drive inequitable health outcomes. Thus, we utilize a health equity lens to address hunger as a social determinant of health, providing access to healthy food and nutrition education while simultaneously offering referrals to supportive services and advocating for stronger food safety-net policy. Hunger is solvable, but no one agency can do it alone, which is why we take a collaborative systems approach to build a more equitable region for all.


Our organizational values lead our organizational strategy

Values:

RESPECT
Dignity – we begin and end our day in service of this value, acting with respect for the feelings, wishes, rights, and traditions of our full community. In doing so we’ll build an environment that prioritizes mutual trust, safety, and wellbeing.
EQUITY
We address layered racial, social, and economic inequities to create a more just food system and enhance access to nutritious food for disproportionally affected people.
ACCOUNTABILITY
We persist in evaluating and assessing the impact of our work, adapting when needed to build on core strengths and implement best practices.
COMMUNITY
We seek to build an inclusive, anti-racist community to deepen the impact of our work both within and beyond our organization. We solve hunger in partnership with volunteers, donors, residents, and, importantly, individuals who understand our impact because they personally have been affected by it.



Strategic Pillars:
1. Champion an anti-racist organizational strategy.
2. Deepen and extend the impact of our programs on populations that are disproportionally impacted by food insecurity.
3. Inspire individuals and communities to support our work by connecting shared philanthropic values to sustained impact.
4. Galvanize our community to help end hunger.


We provide hunger-relief programming and services to 13 zip codes across Cook County, including portions of Chicago and its near-west Suburbs. Our service offerings seek to provide the food, resources, knowledge, and skills people need to live healthy, active lives.

For over 40 years Beyond Hunger has created solutions to end hunger at every stage of life through comprehensive programs that now include: providing emergency food to families in need, summer meals for kids who lack them when school is out, connecting individuals to valuable benefits like SNAP (“food stamps”), conducting nutrition education and cooking classes to combat chronic illness, and delivering groceries to homebound older adults. Organization-wide, we focus on health and nutrition, and provide food that nourishes and sustains that families love.

We focus our food security work on health and nutrition, providing food and resources that nourish and sustain. Our programs provide nutritious, culturally familiar food in a way that respects the wishes of our community. Each year we serve over 10,000 unique individuals living in 13 ZIP codes in Chicagoland —over 42,000 with repeat visits—through 5 distribution options: 1) A convenient Drive-Thru Food Pantry; 2) An in-person Community Market where people select their own food; 3) Home delivered groceries for homebound older adults; 4) Summer meals for kids; 5) An off-site pop-up pantry (“Despensa”) that serves newly immigrated families. To ensure long term food security, we help connect people to benefits like SNAP and Medicare. Unique among local agencies, we offer robust nutrition education and cooking classes to help combat chronic illness.

Beyond Hunger solves hunger with dignity as a core value and in collaboration with the community we serve. We meet people on their terms rather than forcing them to come to a one-size-fits-all food pantry. We’ve learned that one size doesn’t fit the needs of all—particularly not the needs of communities of color. Our programs intentionally seek to advance health equity among older adults, newly immigrated Latino and Hispanic families, and populations experiencing overlapping and compounding vulnerabilities of race, age, and disability.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Beyond Hunger
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14.55

Average of 30.78 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.2

Average of 7.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11%

Average of 8% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Beyond Hunger

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Beyond Hunger

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Beyond Hunger

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Beyond Hunger’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$37,667 $695,625 $1,233,922 $371,827 -$166,343
As % of expenses -1.8% 30.9% 38.0% 10.7% -4.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$48,495 $686,734 $1,222,650 $351,023 -$190,767
As % of expenses -2.3% 30.4% 37.5% 10.1% -5.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,004,237 $3,006,870 $4,402,936 $3,845,381 $3,659,153
Total revenue, % change over prior year 8.9% 50.0% 46.4% -12.7% -4.8%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.7%
Government grants 0.9% 0.4% 2.4% 6.1% 2.4%
All other grants and contributions 96.9% 99.5% 97.5% 93.7% 97.0%
Other revenue 2.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,079,418 $2,248,845 $3,247,087 $3,459,508 $3,754,006
Total expenses, % change over prior year 8.5% 8.1% 44.4% 6.5% 8.5%
Personnel 28.9% 28.2% 24.1% 29.5% 32.5%
Professional fees 3.1% 2.6% 2.1% 2.9% 1.9%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 57.2% 57.5% 64.0% 54.0% 54.5%
All other expenses 10.8% 11.7% 9.7% 13.6% 9.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,090,246 $2,257,736 $3,258,359 $3,480,312 $3,778,430
One month of savings $173,285 $187,404 $270,591 $288,292 $312,834
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $65,078 $0 $72,646
Total full costs (estimated) $2,263,531 $2,445,140 $3,594,028 $3,768,604 $4,163,910

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 4.6 8.4 9.7 10.0 9.2
Months of cash and investments 4.6 8.4 9.7 10.0 9.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.2 7.6 9.6 10.2 8.7
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $791,063 $1,568,999 $2,614,422 $2,877,819 $2,876,315
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $10,000 $0 $26,824 $162,688 $11,100
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $118,670 $118,670 $183,748 $190,413 $263,056
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 66.6% 74.1% 54.0% 63.0% 54.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 5.0% 3.3% 1.8% 2.3% 6.3%
Unrestricted net assets $760,683 $1,447,417 $2,670,067 $3,021,090 $2,830,323
Temporarily restricted net assets $47,300 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $47,300 $109,700 $31,627 $45,673 $117,163
Total net assets $807,983 $1,557,117 $2,701,694 $3,066,763 $2,947,486

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Michele Zurakowski

Michele Zurakowski, Ph.D., has shepherded Beyond Hunger’s transformation over the past two decades from a small food pantry to a multi-faceted anti-hunger service provider reaching beyond the basement where the food pantry is located and into the community where hunger lives. Some of the programs developed under her leadership include Summer Meals for children, Home Delivery for older adults and people with disabilities, Cooking Classes and Nutrition Education, and a Pop-Up food pantry which serves a suburban immigrant population. She has overseen an aggressive food rescue program, recruiting local merchants to donate over 200,000 pounds of perishable groceries and 20,000 meals from cafeterias each year. Michele is an ardent food and nutrition security advocate, working to alter policies and create a more racially equitable food system.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Beyond Hunger

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Beyond Hunger

Board of directors
as of 02/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Donna Myers

Principal at Adaptation Capital

Donna Myers

Non profit development,management and governance, presently a community volunteer

Susie Goldschmidt

Vice President, Banc of America Leasing

Cassandra West

Media consultant and freelance business and education writer

Cuyler Brown

Vice President, Huntington National Bank

Thomas Gary

Public Policy Professional

Laura Gutierrez

Administrative Assistant, Porgrams at the Chicago Community Trust

Patricia Hannon

Pediatritian, Erie Behavioral Health

Andrew Maychruk

Chief Technology Officer at Old Second National Bank

Stephanie Schrodt

Volunteer, certified teacher, past HR Manager

Tom Watson

Head of Sales, Hanweck Associates

David Henkes

Food and beverage industry researcher/consultant at Technomic Inc

Tom Irvin

Managing Partner and co-founder Guggenheim Partners

Shawn K. Joseph

Licensed Banker with JPMorgan Chase & Co

Tyrone Thomas

Vice President and Deputy General Counsel at Invenergy

Stacey Williams

Community volunteer with a professional background in marketing and strategy

Liz Ziehl

Community Volunteer with over 20 years professional experience in commercial lending, publishing, sales, marketing and purchasing.

Montague Short

Senior Manager, HR Business Partner at CDW

Adriana Riano

Manager, Programs, Feeding America

Shatisha Woods

Principal Business Solution Consultant at Healthcare Service Corporation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/20/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.