PLATINUM2024

Osprey Village, Inc.

People. Porches. Potential

Bluffton, SC   |  www.ospreyvillage.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Osprey Village, Inc.

EIN: 26-2967726


Mission

Osprey Village, Inc is a 501(c)3 nonprofit working to provide accessible housing options for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities that foster community, encourage inclusion, and support achieving independence.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our 2018 Form 990 shows over $1M in "revenues," but that number includes the value of items donated to our two thrift stores as well as sales of those items - well over two thirds of those "revenues." And of course the reported expenses include the costs of operating the two thrift stores, including paying the employees who work there. As of Jan. 1, 2020, we have established a separate Osprey Village Thrift Stores LLC subsidiary which will file its own Form 990s in the future. This should clarify any potential confusion resulting from prior reporting of the financials for Osprey Village Inc. and the thrift stores together on the same Form 990.

Ruling year info

2009

COO

David D'Amico

Main address

PO Box 3155

Bluffton, SC 29910 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-2967726

Subject area info

Family disability resources

Housing for people with disabilities

Developmental disability services

Independent living for people with disabilities

Population served info

Caregivers

People with psychosocial disabilities

People with intellectual disabilities

People with learning disabilities

People with disabilities

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Families who have children or siblings with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) have had a big question weighing on their minds for many years: What will happen to our family member with disabilities once we are no longer here or able to support them? Osprey Village was founded in 2008 by such families to develop an answer to that question. Our mission is to provide accessible housing options for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities that foster community, encourage inclusion, and support achieving independence. In 2022, over 16,000 adults were on South Carolinas IDD residential waitlist for long-term housing, with over 20,000 on the state-wide waiting list for a variety of support services. It is estimated that by 2030, 25% of the current 7.38 million people with IDD in the United States will be homeless. For more than 4.5 million (60%) of those people with IDD, living with their parents or a close family member has been the only real viable answer.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Development of Housing for Developmentally Disabled Adults

Osprey Village was founded in 2008 by families to provide accessible housing options for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities that foster community, encourage inclusion, and support achieving independence.
We are building a high-quality neighborhood for medium to high functioning adults with IDD. We have received inquiries from over 300 interested families and individuals nationwide, but we are focusing on families already living in our area for our first phase of 100 villas.
Our neighborhood will be developed on a donated 25-acre parcel in the East Argent Tract of the City of Hardeeville, Jasper County, SC.
Four cornerstones of our Mission:
- High quality personalized service with lifelong care / aging-in-place
- Village site plan and residences architecturally designed specifically for people with IDD
- Continual resident safety with built-in security technology
- Long-term sustainable business model that includes low entry pricing on 1/3 of the residence units

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Caregivers
People with learning disabilities
People with psychosocial disabilities

Where we work

Awards

GHC-Inspired Initiative 2011

Generations of Hope Development Corporation

Affiliations & memberships

Beaufort County disAbilities Coalition - founder 2013

Together SC 2009

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families who have expressed interest in having their family member with IDD live in Osprey Village

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Development of Housing for Developmentally Disabled Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers come from contacts via our website, emails, and phone calls to our office. We have followed up by contacting all of the interested families by either phone or email.

Number of families who have made an initial commitment to purchasing a residence in Osprey Village for their family member with IDD

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Development of Housing for Developmentally Disabled Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These are all local families who are ready to pay a refundable $5000 "earnest money" fee to be able to select a villa model and location in our neighborhood plan. We just opened this list in late 2023

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Mission: To provide accessible housing options for adults with developmental disabilities that foster community, encourage inclusion, and support achieving independence.

Our Vision: To provide a range of residential housing options and personal caregiver services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) that support achieving lifelong independent living and personal growth.

Four cornerstones of the Osprey Village Mission:
- High quality personalized service with lifelong care / aging-in-place
- Village site plan and residences architecturally designed specifically for people with IDD a unique innovative model that can be replicated in many communities nationwide
- Continual resident safety with built-in security technology
- Long-term sustainable business model that includes low entry homeownership pricing on 1/3 of the residence units

All of the residence pricing in Osprey Village is being set as low as possible due to several very favorable factors:
- The large scale of building and contractor activity in the East Argent development
- Our very close partnership with the East Argent site developer and managers
- Our custom-designed home architecture pre-planned for low maintenance costs

Phase 1 will include 100 cottage villa units priced competitively to other new residential communities in the local area. Phase 2 will include 60 units with lower entry pricing and rental opportunities.

In 2017, we received a donation of 25 acres of buildable land from the master developer of a 7300 acre planned development located in Hardeeville, Jasper County, SC. We anticipate permitting will begin in Fall 2024 with initial groundbreaking in early 2025; our first residences should be ready for move-in in 2026.

A range of paid professional services will be coordinated between the neighborhood and the broader community. Special attention will be paid to developing independent living skills that will enable adults with IDD to achieve their greatest capabilities by growing both individually and in their relationships with neighbors. Osprey Village will also welcome the involvement of other organizations that already are serving our future residents with social, recreational, and educational programs and services.

The master development and architectural program include the following:
- Site Area: 25 acres located in the East Argent Tract of Rt. 170 in Hardeeville, SC
- 160 residential units total
- 140 1-bedroom units; 8 2-bedroom units; 12 supportive housing units
- 100 Units will be for-sale, market rate homes as part of a condominium regime.
-60 units will be a mix of for-sale and rental homes; 25% of the rental homes will be affordable housing units.
- 10,000 S.F. Community Center will have offices, movie theater, caf, event and dining room, fitness center, gaming room, meeting room, and other support facilities.
- Community swimming pool with an outdoor TV pavilion and grill area.
- The neighborhood will be gated and fenced for increased safety and security.
- Parks and walking trails will be integrated into the community.
- Future plans include a Job Training Center near the main entrance with a community room and coffee/caf or ice cream shop as well as space for collaborative retail operations with other nonprofits with a common mission to support persons with IDD.

We have a dedicated and passionate Board of Directors that includes several "founding families" as well as current and retired professionals with expertise in finance, land planning, education, business management, marketing, and social services:
- Our Board Chair is the Broker-in-Charge of the largest realty firm in the area.
- Our Board VP is a land planner and landscape architect who developed the plans for The Cypress, the first continuing care community in the nation.
- Our Board Treasurer has developed and run the healthcare facilities financing divisions for several banks.
- Our COO has led the development of a large neighborhood in Bluffton SC area as well as being the former Executive Director of Programs for Exceptional People, a local day program.

Osprey Village was approved as a Qualified Service Provider by the SC Dept. of Developmental Disabilities (DDSN) in early 2016. We have also partnered with a number of human service organizations and alliances in our area, and we led the founding of the Beaufort County Disabilities Coalition to bring together local service agencies and businesses to collaborate and coordinate our efforts.

We are currently in discussions with state and local government officials to form a public/private partnership that would enable us to serve more people at a lower cost with better outcomes. The State of South Carolina has already awarded $1.8M in grants to our project, with more anticipated in the upcoming years.

We started our Osprey Village Thrift Store in April, 2011, in order to provide operational funds for our future neighborhood with a purpose" to support developmentally disabled adults and their caregivers in the Bluffton and Hilton Head area. The store is open Monday Saturday and is staffed mostly by volunteers. We opened a second store called "Osprey Village Thrift on Main" on Hilton Head Island in March 2017 and also added offices and meeting space for our staff, clients and board members there.

Several of our potential future residents are working as volunteers at our Thrift Stores along with many retirees from nearby Sun City Hilton Head.

We received a donation of ~25 acres of buildable land in City of Hardeeville by a national housing developer in December 2017. They see our "neighborhood with a purpose" concept as an attractive complement to their plans for a larger development of over 9300 home sites.

We were awarded a $1M grant from the State of South Carolina in 2023 for the development of our Community Center facility and the services and programs that will be provided from that facility. We have already received initial commitments from 30 families to purchase residences in Osprey Village; 22 of them are also investing $100K each into the project. And we have a term sheet from a local bank to provide up to $30M in lending for the construction of our first 100 residential units in Phase I of our project.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.99

Average of 240.63 over 8 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.6

Average of 5.6 over 8 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

22%

Average of 5% over 8 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Osprey Village, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Osprey Village, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Osprey Village, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Osprey Village, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$25,689 $201,734 -$207,878 -$102,765 -$27,005
As % of expenses -2.6% 18.0% -37.5% -26.3% -9.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$34,295 $201,734 -$212,226 -$102,765 -$27,005
As % of expenses -3.4% 18.0% -38.0% -26.3% -9.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,160,904 $1,232,320 $394,579 $273,946 $148,292
Total revenue, % change over prior year 1.7% 6.2% -68.0% -30.6% -45.9%
Program services revenue 36.3% 37.5% 7.1% 6.3% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.1% 0.2% 0.1% 0.6%
Government grants 17.2% 16.2% 18.0% 17.6% 16.0%
All other grants and contributions 46.2% 45.6% 74.7% 76.0% 83.4%
Other revenue 0.2% 0.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,003,705 $1,119,845 $553,766 $390,401 $279,185
Total expenses, % change over prior year -3.4% 11.6% -50.5% -29.5% -28.5%
Personnel 36.5% 35.8% 38.8% 35.6% 13.3%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 25.9% 32.8% 58.1%
Occupancy 23.1% 20.6% 1.7% 2.1% 6.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.3% 1.5%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 12.8% 0.0%
All other expenses 40.4% 43.6% 33.6% 15.3% 20.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,012,311 $1,119,845 $558,114 $390,401 $279,185
One month of savings $83,642 $93,320 $46,147 $32,533 $23,265
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,095,953 $1,213,165 $604,261 $422,934 $302,450

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.8 1.4 4.9 5.6 7.6
Months of cash and investments 2.8 1.5 7.6 10.2 9.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -3.7 -1.1 -6.3 -10.6 -16.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $230,368 $133,010 $225,582 $183,057 $176,166
Investments $0 $4,536 $126,065 $149,786 $39,075
Receivables $4,383 $212,200 $33,264 $753 $150
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $467,005 $467,005 $437,186 $372,000 $372,000
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 3.7% 5.5% 3.5% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.8% 0.5% 18.6% 23.4% 30.3%
Unrestricted net assets $139,628 $341,362 $129,136 $26,371 -$634
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $568,018 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $568,018 $478,759 $527,597 $514,018 $410,130
Total net assets $707,646 $820,121 $656,733 $540,389 $409,496

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

COO

David D'Amico

Our new Chief Operating Officer, Dave D'Amico, has over 30 years of land development construction and European financing experience. He also remains active in several family businesses. Nearly a decade ago he began to apply his vast business experience to managing special needs businesses in SC. He was a Board member of Programs for Exceptional People, and then was named the Executive Director to help stabilize the organization during the COVID crisis when operations had to be temporarily suspended. Most recently he was named COO of Osprey Village. He has actively served The Town of Hilton Head as a past member of the Zoning Board of Appeals and a named member of the Steering Committee, committed to the 20-year future planning for Hilton Head Island. Hes an Eagle Scout and has enjoyed being a volunteer football coach for over a decade at the high school level. He is also a 1982 graduate of Ithaca College with a BS in Business

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Osprey Village, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Osprey Village, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Thomas Reed

Broker-in-Charge of Charter One Realty

Term: 2019 - 2024

Jeff Norkus

Retired, IBM Microelectronics Finance

William Lincicome

Site Concepts LLC

Thomas Reed

Charter One Realty

Edward Greene

Senior Account Manager, Palmetto Benefit Solutions

Natasha Donaldson

Investments & Insurance Agent

Edward Doyle

Financial Manager

Matthew Huber

Flagstar Bank, N.A. Banking Financier

John Jolley

Attorney, Jolley Law Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/9/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser