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Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Our vision is for every child diagnosed with cancer, and their family, to reach their full potential.

Chattanooga, TN   |  http://www.hatcherfoundation.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

EIN: 20-8065108


Mission

At the Austin Hatcher Foundation, our vision is for all childhood cancer patients, survivors, and the entire family to reach their full human potential through education, balance, and health & well-being.

Ruling year info

2007

Principal Officer

Amy Jo Osborn

Main address

1705 S Holtzclaw Ave

Chattanooga, TN 37404 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-8065108

Subject area info

STEM education

Early childhood education

Patient social services

Mental health care

Cancers

Population served info

Infants and toddlers

Children

Preteens

Adolescents

Young adults

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Cancer (G30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Therapies and Services

AHF addresses the unmet need for mental health and well-being for the entire family at the onset of pediatric cancer. The Foundations Education Advancement Center is the nations only psychosocial center, offering evidence-based mental health services and supportive care to children affected by childhood cancer and their entire family. All programs/services are provided at NO cost and insurance is not collected, fulfilling disparities in healthcare for families who cannot afford these types of invaluable services. Of the people served by AHF in 2023, 25% were 200% below poverty and considered indigent under Federal Poverty Guidelines. For these families, a pediatric cancer diagnosis only exacerbates their risks for poor outcomes. AHF comes alongside the families, giving them tools to cope in the present and thrive in the future. The Foundations impact on families is invaluable.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer Therapies and Services

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AHF's mission is to erase the effects of pediatric cancer and optimize each childs quality of life through essential, specialized intervention beginning at the time of diagnosis and continuing throughout survivorship. AHF is the Nations ONLY Psycho-Oncology Center providing 100% free services. AHF provides service to the child diagnosed with cancer and their entire family for life, for free, acknowledging there are lifelong,irreversible effects of cancer. Our vision is for every child diagnosed with cancer, and their family, to reach their full potential. The Foundation focuses on diagnosing and treating the educational and functional deficits associated with pediatric cancer and its life-saving treatments. AHFs licensed clinical team provides children and families with the tools to cope in the present and thrive in the future after childhood cancer.

The founding of AHF in 2006 represents resiliency, as Dr. Jim and Amy Jo Osborn turned their tragedy, of losing their first born son to pediatric cancer at 9 weeks old, into a life-giving Foundation. In 2009 the Foundation opened its first psychosocial clinic in a 2,500 sq.ft. office located in the local Childrens Hospital, then grew to 6,000 sq. ft. in 2017. In 2019 AHF purchased and built out the 33,000 sq. ft. location that the Foundation is in today. AHF has a wide variety of clinical services that are unique to the Foundation. The Foundations Education Advancement Center houses extensive evidence-based programs offered at NO cost to the families and insurance is not collected, fulfilling disparities in healthcare. The clinical team utilizes individual expertise to provide evidence-based collaborative interventions which promote quality of life for all individuals who receive treatment through the Foundation. Another service AHF utilizes is Industrial Arts Education Therapy, which is a STEM based educational therapy program that allows children to apply the freedom of movement as a form of rehabilitation. This unique therapy option not only helps clinically, but also teaches children shop skills that they can use in their future, and projects completed by the children are often auctioned to then further fundraising efforts. The Foundations Education Advancement Center houses extensive evidence-based programs offered at NO cost to the families and insurance is not collected, fulfilling disparities in healthcare.

AHF is committed to providing free service to all children with cancer and their families. All families face unprecedented challenges and life-transformations when faced with pediatric cancer. While cancer makes all families vulnerable, AHF children and families whose household incomes fall below the poverty line make our mission crucial for their cancer journey as we provide free, accessible services and therapies for life for the whole family from diagnosis to survivorship.

AHF addresses the unmet need for mental health and well-being for the entire family at the onset of pediatric cancer. The Foundations Education Advancement Center is the nations only psychosocial center, offering evidence-based mental health services and supportive care to children affected by childhood cancer and their entire family. All programs/services are provided at NO cost and insurance is not collected, fulfilling disparities in healthcare for families who cannot afford these types of invaluable services. Of the people served by AHF in 2023, 25% were 200% below poverty and considered indigent under Federal Poverty Guidelines. For these families, a pediatric cancer diagnosis only exacerbates their risks for poor outcomes. AHF comes alongside the families, giving them tools to cope in the present and thrive in the future. The Foundations impact on families is invaluable. Their trials and trauma are real and devastating. They are vulnerable, scared, and numb. Children, teens, and young adults will face learning problems, growth problems, and developmental delays. Families have endless appointments with oncologists, endocrinologists, neurologists, and countless other specialists to manage the lasting effects of treatment. Often these children and their siblings face psychosocial issues when they try to resume a normal life after months or years spent isolated from their peers. The Foundation meets every family where they are and all services are tailored to each individuals needs. We must create the best possible outcomes for our younger population to build strong communities and the services AHF provides are comprehensive and not bound by a family's ability to pay or have insurance. The therapies and supportive services provided at AHF are 100% free.

To keep up with the growth in services provided, in 2022 AHF streamlined its development team with the
hire of a Director of Development and an Events & Community Relations Coordinator. This team is tasked
with organizing and strengthening annual fundraising to provide long-term sustainability and identify new opportunities for continued growth in financial support, community awareness, and volunteer engagement. Creating efficiencies in the annual fundraising plan is allowing AHFs leadership team to more intentionally steward national donor relationships, identify and cultivate new AHF partners, and provide the organizational direction for accomplishing our strategic priorities. The Austin Hatcher Foundation sustains its programs and services through nationwide fundraising events in association with Annual Corporate Partners: IMSA (International Motor Sports Association), SEMA (Specialty Equipment Manufacturing Association), and Road Atlanta, local fundraising events, grants, major donors, and many community partners who donate their time and resources.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.48

Average of 1.71 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.7

Average of 8.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 6% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $217,868 $605,924 -$105,588 $921,327 $643,998
As % of expenses 27.7% 65.5% -10.9% 72.4% 41.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $161,040 $545,121 -$270,455 $672,546 $409,887
As % of expenses 19.1% 55.3% -23.8% 44.2% 22.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $999,972 $1,540,244 $984,419 $2,062,106 $1,570,022
Total revenue, % change over prior year 21.6% 54.0% -36.1% 109.5% -23.9%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.6%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 9.3% 9.3%
All other grants and contributions 99.8% 99.0% 97.4% 87.9% 89.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.8% 2.5% 2.7% 1.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $786,020 $924,603 $971,217 $1,272,773 $1,556,713
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.9% 17.6% 5.0% 31.0% 22.3%
Personnel 49.6% 53.3% 51.6% 35.2% 55.8%
Professional fees 7.2% 4.1% 3.1% 10.3% 7.3%
Occupancy 3.3% 5.6% 5.3% 6.5% 4.5%
Interest 7.0% 5.9% 10.5% 10.9% 6.9%
Pass-through 6.9% 5.8% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 26.1% 25.2% 29.5% 37.0% 25.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $842,848 $985,406 $1,136,084 $1,521,554 $1,790,824
One month of savings $65,502 $77,050 $80,935 $106,064 $129,726
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $1,064,416 $131,225
Fixed asset additions $0 $2,026,447 $1,540,425 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $908,350 $3,088,903 $2,757,444 $2,692,034 $2,051,775

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 8.6 8.0 7.2 9.2 9.7
Months of cash and investments 8.6 8.0 7.2 9.2 11.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.1 3.5 1.7 8.5 10.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $561,140 $614,515 $580,462 $974,119 $1,258,056
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $209,591
Receivables $597,092 $520,395 $449,666 $500,619 $278,864
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,239,836 $3,266,282 $4,773,999 $3,805,493 $3,805,493
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 12.0% 6.4% 7.2% 11.4% 17.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 42.8% 54.7% 73.2% 57.0% 53.2%
Unrestricted net assets $712,175 $1,257,296 $986,841 $1,659,387 $2,069,274
Temporarily restricted net assets $659,585 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $659,585 $669,302 $494,802 $495,000 $235,000
Total net assets $1,371,760 $1,926,598 $1,481,643 $2,154,387 $2,304,274

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Amy Jo Osborn

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Austin Hatcher Foundation For Pediatric Cancer

Board of directors
as of 04/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Dr. James Osborn

Comprehensive Spine Institute


Board co-chair

Amy Jo Osborn

Austin Hatcher Foundation for Pediatric Cancer

Rebecca Ashford

President, Chattanooga State Community College

Dax Branam

Special Education Teacher,Thrasher Elementary

Celeste Bradley

HR Attorney, EEO Consultant, DEI Trainer, Title IX Investigator and Trainer

John Doonan

President, IMSA (International Motor Sports Association)

Doug Evans

President, IMSA (International Motor Sports Association)

Ana Faulk

English-Spanish Translator

Jeffrey Geismar

Director of Accounting and Finance - PlayCore

Donna Gibson

UTC- Program Coordinator

Ashley Guthrie

Family Nurse Practitioner

Gary Hathaway

Financial Services Professional Agent, New York Life Insurance Company

Josh Heath

Scenic City Devices

Albert Leavengood

Operations Leader at Cigna

Cindy Lee

President and Founder, LYNC Logistics LLC

Gary Patrick

Attorney; Patrick Beard Schulman Jacoway

Justin Robertson

Superintendent, Hamilton County Schools

Steve Snyder

VP, Garland Carpet & Rug

Ryan Voskuil

Orthopedic Oncology Surgeon

Thomas White

Sr VP Investor Relations

Meg Winfield

Development of Athletics, CCS

Carol Yim

Educator

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/11/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.