PLATINUM2023

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

One Small Organization. Committed to Big Change. Improving Lives One by One.

Madison, WI   |  https://wisconsinmicrofinance.com/
GuideStar Charity Check

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

EIN: 27-3945492


Mission

Our mission is to use microfinance to empower aspiring entrepreneurs, primarily women, living in extreme poverty to create a more equitable and sustainable world. Vision: To end extreme poverty by using business and capital to provide a hand up (not a hand out).

Ruling year info

2014

President

Tom Eggert

Executive Director

Alen Amini

Main address

5810 Idledale Cir

Madison, WI 53711 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-3945492

Subject area info

Sustainable development

Rural development

Microfinance

Entrepreneurship

Social enterprise

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Women

People of Southeast Asian descent

People of African descent

Economically disadvantaged people

Self-employed people

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We aim to address extreme poverty and inequality affected by lack of access to credit and financial services in poor, rural areas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Haiti Program with FOTADEL

The 2010 earthquake inspired the founders of Wisconsin Microfinance. That same year, the organization was formed and began providing microloans in Haiti. In 2020, during the pandemic, Wisconsin Microfinance forged a new partnership with the Federation of Organizations and Agricultural Technicians (FOTADEL) of Léogane. FOTADEL is a cooperative of 17 farmers’ associations that provides farmers educational and financial support. By the fall of 2020, Wisconsin Microfinance and FOTADEL agreed on the structure of a microfinance program and identified the first several groups of loan recipients. Based on the success of the program, additional loans are being made with the goal to expand the loan program to all 17 of the regional farmers' associations.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Women
Working poor
Farmers
Self-employed people

After the typhoon and earthquake in the Philippines, Wisconsin Microfinance decided to add a new microfinance program in the Bohol and Pitigo Islands of the Philippines. We partnered with VICTO Credit Union to serve individuals in four communities within these islands. Together, VICTO and Wisconsin Microfinance have been able to target individuals and families effected by natural disasters and poverty.

Population(s) Served
People of Southeast Asian descent
Economically disadvantaged people
Self-employed people
Farmers
Women

Where we work

Awards

Top-Rated 2021

Great Non-profits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total $ donated (minus fees) / Total # Unique Donors

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Added program in the DR

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to use microfinance to empower aspiring entrepreneurs living in extreme poverty to create a more equitable and sustainable world.

Our strategic priorities for 2021 are to
1. Create and execute a successful, sustainable and measurable loan administration process
2. Develop and execute a financial resource development plan to support and sustain our mission
3. Develop a broader reach for WI Microfinance

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

Financial data

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Revenue
Contributions, Grants, Gifts $37,608
Program Services $0
Membership Dues $0
Special Events $7,240
Other Revenue $0
Total Revenue $44,848
Expenses
Program Services $18,971
Administration $1,206
Fundraising $0
Payments to Affiliates $0
Other Expenses $0
Total Expenses $1,679

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assets
Total Assets $80,178
Liabilities
Total Liabilities $0
Fund balance (EOY)
Net Assets $80,178

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Tom Eggert

Tom is the Founder and President of the Board of Wisconsin Microfinance, the Founder and past Executive Director of the WI Sustainable Business Council and taught at the University of Wisconsin. Tom founded WI Microfinance in response to the Haitian earthquake in early 2010. His interest in sustainability has led him to develop multiple classes at the UW, travel on a Fulbright Scholarship to Latvia and serve on the advisory board for the University of Wisconsin Office of Sustainability. He holds a law degree from George Washington University, a Masters in Public Administration from the LaFollette Institute, and, prior to law school, was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines.

Executive Director

Alen Amini

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Wisconsin Microfinance Inc

Board of directors
as of 04/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Tom Eggert

UW Madison

Term: 2010 - 2025

Paul Ohlrogge

University of Wisconsin Extension

Jane McCurry

Michigan Clean Fuels

LeeAnn Glover

American Family Insurance

Mark S Johnson

UW Madison

Robert Fischer

GTiMA

Joe Bonnell

University of Wisconsin Extension

Trevor Franda

Travelers Insurance

Nathan Fredrick

Riverwater Partners

Emily Swift

American Family Insurance

Annalise Ebert

Federal Reserve

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/5/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Middle Eastern/North African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.