PLATINUM2024

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

A work of heart

Fayetteville, GA   |  https://fayettehumane.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

EIN: 58-1592706


Mission

Fayette Humane Society advocates for animals, supports the community, and enhances pet/owner relationships through spay/neuter programs, rehoming & adoption services, and community education and outreach.

Notes from the nonprofit

https://fayettehumane.org/give-now/

Ruling year info

1974

President

Rick DeLoach

Main address

PO Box 244

Fayetteville, GA 30214 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fayette County Humane Society

EIN

58-1592706

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Public affairs

Population served info

Adults

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Reduce the population of homeless companion animals, reduce the county's euthanasia rate.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care and Adoption

FHS PROVIDES HOUSING, FOOD AND MEDICAL CARE FOR ABANDONED ANIMALS.  We do not have a shelter, so the animals stay in foster homes with our voluteers until we can find them forever homes.  We advertise available animals on our website and in the local newspaper.  We also conduct weekend pet adoptions at the Peachtree City PetSmart.

Population(s) Served
Adults

FCHS covers the costs of spay/neuter surgery for up to 3 pets (cats or dogs) in low-income households. After our staff verify the clients' eligibility, we provide a certificate which they take to an approved vet.  Once the surgery has been performed, the vet submits the certificate to FCHS for reimbursement.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We have volunteers who are teachers and/or Toastmasters willing to speak in local schools, libraries, and in front of any group who requests our presence.  Topics include proper pet care and the importance of spaying or neutering to control overpopulation.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We work with other groups to control the feral cat population by setting up feeding stations and trapping, neutering, and vaccinating the feral cats.  We place the kittens in foster homes for socialization and eventual adoption.  We release the adults that cannot be tamed to the feral colony so they can live out their natural lives without reproducing.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Most people looking to adopt a pet want puppies or kittens; it is much harder to place older animals, which we often get through abandonment and owner surrenders.  Many senior citizens live on fixed incomes and find it difficult to afford the adoption fee for a pet; also, many do not have the energy required to train and play with a young animal.  Our "seniors for seniors" pairs older, more sedate cats and dogs with elderly clients at a reduced adoption fee.  Funding is needed to make up the shortfall between the adoption fee collected and the additional medical care required to ensure the health of the older animals.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Nonprofit of the Year (Fayette County Chamber of Commerce) 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Low-income people

Related Program

Foster Care and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FHS adopts cats and dogs

Number of animals receiving subsidized or free spay/neuter services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

low-income spay/neuter assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Owned cats and dogs as well as free-roaming community cats in Fayette and surrounding Georgia counties

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Fayette Humane Society strives to eliminate the needless killing of healthy, adoptable pets. We provide temporary foster care for homeless cats and dogs found as strays or surrendered by their owners. All pets we adopt out are vaccinated and spayed or neutered. Most are also microchipped. As funds permit, we provide spay/neuter assistance for low-income pet owners in an effort to reduce animal overpopulation. The Fayette Humane Society supports TNVR (Trap/Neuter/Vaccinate/Return) as the best method of controlling the community cat population.

The FHS aggressively promotes spay/neuter as well as proper care and respect for animals. We provide education about the problem of pet overpopulation and the fact that cats and dogs can breed when they are as young as four months old. Unaltered companion animals, especially cats, can reproduce exponentially, and as a result, millions end up euthanized in shelters or killed on the highways because there are not enough homes.
We recently began partnering with other rescue groups and shelters to transport homeless animals from Georgia to northern states where the demand is greater.

We have many dedicated volunteers who are committed to rescuing and caring for homeless animals until they can be placed with loving families. We also realize we cannot solve pet overpopulation through adoption alone, so we work to promote spay/neuter for all companion pets in the community. We are also reaching out to rescue groups in northern states where cold winters and stricter spay/neuter laws have limited puppy and kitten births.

The FHS partners with the Fayette County Commissioners, other animal rescue organizations, and Fayette County Animal Control to spread the word about spay/neuter and puppy mills. We successfully completed a trial TNR program and worked with FCAC to rewrite local ordinances to make TNR protocol (instead of the traditional policy of trap and euthanize).
We plan to become more involved in transporting homeless animals to areas where the pet demand is greater.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

78.51

Average of 14.58 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.7

Average of 5.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$42,020 $64,324 $113,299 $15,205 $172,180
As % of expenses -13.3% 20.8% 32.5% 4.1% 46.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$42,020 $64,324 $113,299 $15,205 $152,980
As % of expenses -13.3% 20.8% 32.5% 4.1% 39.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $274,954 $373,749 $462,403 $384,964 $545,213
Total revenue, % change over prior year -6.8% 35.9% 23.7% -16.7% 41.6%
Program services revenue 43.2% 35.3% 33.1% 35.3% 28.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 56.8% 64.7% 66.9% 63.5% 71.8%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.2% 0.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $316,857 $309,425 $349,104 $369,759 $373,033
Total expenses, % change over prior year -2.3% -2.3% 12.8% 5.9% 0.9%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Professional fees 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.4%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 99.8% 99.8% 99.8% 99.8% 99.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $316,857 $309,425 $349,104 $369,759 $392,233
One month of savings $26,405 $25,785 $29,092 $30,813 $31,086
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $56,776
Total full costs (estimated) $343,262 $335,210 $378,196 $400,572 $480,095

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.0 4.5 8.5 8.1 11.7
Months of cash and investments 2.0 4.5 8.5 8.1 11.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.0 4.6 8.0 8.0 11.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $52,501 $116,825 $247,082 $249,450 $364,841
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $56,776
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 33.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 6.8% 1.9% 1.1%
Unrestricted net assets $54,050 $118,374 $231,673 $246,878 $399,858
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $54,050 $118,374 $231,673 $246,878 $399,858

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No Yes No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Rick DeLoach

Rick and his wife, Andrea, have been volunteers for the Fayette Humane Society since 2018. He also volunteers with his work colleagues to combat homelessness through RentPath Gives Back where he serves as Director of Financial Systems and Process. Rick served as Treasurer for Peachtree Road Lutheran church and church counsel at Apostle's Lutheran in Sandy Springs. He is active with the Fayette County Beekeepers Association and the Coweta Bee Association. He graduated from Georgia Tech with a BS in Industrial Management. He worked 14 years with MCI/WorldCom in Finance, Business Analysis and finally in International Line Cost Accounting. He served as Chief Operating Officer of a startup limited benefit medical wholesaler for 2 years. As Director of Operations for a startup in Boca Raton, FL, that went from 30 employees to 250 in two years, he designed most of the business operation processes and managed IT.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

FAYETTE HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Rick DeLoach

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 - 2024

Sharon Marchisello

No Affiliation

Julie Lueder

No affiliation

Rick DeLoach

No affiliation

Penny Molis

No affiliation

Lucy Hess

No affiliation

Mary Ellen Willey

No affiliation

Kristina Doyle

Corinne Eckert

Cindy Cunningham

Kristina Doyle

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/20/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.