Blessing Hands Inc

Helping people help themselves and others

aka Blessing Hands   |   Morehead, KY   |  https://www.blessinghands.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Blessing Hands Inc

EIN: 20-4794276


Mission

Blessing Hands Inc. works to help disadvantaged students in China, Thailand, Myanmar & the Philippines to reach their full potential. We help those who help themselves and others. Our core belief is that giving is a blessing, and we seek to teach by example that every person can be blessing hands to others. We want to foster international friendships through our sponsorship programs and encourage Western volunteers to interact with our target communities and students.

Notes from the nonprofit

We have a certificate as a Foreign Non-Governmental Organization in Guangxi Province in China, but the file will not upload.

Ruling year info

2006

Director and Founder

Mrs. Betty Cutts

Main address

106 Timber Lane

Morehead, KY 40351 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-4794276

Subject area info

Equal opportunity in education

Elementary and secondary education

Philanthropy

School libraries and media centers

Public affairs

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Young adults

Economically disadvantaged people

Low-income people

People with disabilities

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (T99)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In 2010, there were an estimated 9 million children living in poverty in China. Many of our students are left-behind children whose migrant parents cannot get education or health benefits for their children in the cities due to the government’s hukou system. 61 million children are left behind with relatives to attend free public schools. We serve functional orphans who do not qualify for government help or students who have some kind of personal/familial disability/ handicap. Most are female, the less preferred gender. In Myanmar, we are bringing small individual solar systems to schools and providing school supplies to students who come with few resources to the school. The closest city is Matupi which is a 3-day walk. These villages are linked by language, kinship, and Christianity. There is a network of church leaders, teachers from a local college, and village elders who are willing to carry out assistance to their village schools. These students and their villages need help.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Yangshuo Schools

In 2022, $11,365.78 in sponsorship was given. Yangshuo County, Guangxi Province was the first area where we helped students in 2005. We have a student sponsorship program there involving school aid for younger children and tuition grants for high school students. We have sponsored over 435 primary school, middle school, high school, and college students in the Yangshuo area in 14 years. We enrolled 32 students in 12 schools in the fall of 2019. We have helped 67 Yangshuo students with college scholarships in the 14 years we have been serving there. $237,985 over 14 years has been given for educational aid and college scholarships. $3,216 has been spent on 7 water purifiers for primary schools. $27,344 has been spent on special sponsorships, medical help, and special summer projects like art events, photography workshops, a summer camp, and clinics. $11,365.78 is our budget amount for 2022-2023 in Yangshuo.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

We are helping small groups of needy primary students in six areas in China. Three of the programs serve the minority groups of Buyi, Yao, and Miao. Each student is selected by principals, education officials, or community volunteers, who know the needs of the student's family. There are over 400 children in these 6 programs. The volunteers who oversee these programs are college and high school teachers, a doctor, and education department employees. For most of them, we provide school aid of $145 a semester, but some students get partial support of $42 a semester. School aid covers books, clothes, and school supplies. Full support also pays for their lunches. We seek out sponsors for them that will follow their progress and be interested in their lives. The sponsors get thank you letters, pictures of their children and their family information. Sponsors are welcome to visit their children or write to them through their schools. We take them small gifts during summer visits.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

We support 20 primary students in a small neighborhood church school in the slums of Manila.

In 2022, We will encourage our Blessing Hands students as they enter their first full year of school after covid. Blessing Hands' sponsorship will cover their books and tuition fees. We have 20 students and a $10,000 budget for Philippines this year.

In 2021, we supported these schools in efforts to transition into technology to continue school in the midst of Covid.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

In 2021, Myanmar erupted in political unrest and many fled to the villages we serve. We are giving school supplies, solar systems, 21 educational sponsorships, 3 motorcycles, library books, and teacher supplies to three village schools in the Taubu area of Maraland in the Chin State of Myanmar. We are also supporting a three-month English program for 90 students in two villages in the Taubu area. Two bilingual Mara speaking teachers are teaching the classes. We are partnering with the Taubu Village to finish a road.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In 2022, we will serve 57 students at En Hui School to cover school tuitions.
In 2021, we served 64 students, and gave books to their library.

Chiang Mao is 3 miles from the Myanmar border so they have many refugees. There are nearly 20,000 people in this town. En Hui Church began its school in 2004 and has expanded to two locations in the Chiang Dao area. There are 870 students and 35 teachers in total in the school. They have 4 kindergarten classes, 3 classes each for first - sixth grades, 2 classes of middle school students, and one high school class. Students go to government schools, but En Hui offers after-school classes in Chinese, math, and some English.

Twenty to thirty percent of the people in Chiang Dao cannot move out of the border area for work because they are not citizens of Thailand. Families cannot own land since they have no citizenship. Drug traders are active nearby the border and no one is safe after dark.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

In 2022, we will give up to 31 scholarships.

In 2021, we gave 27 college scholarships to our students.

Blessing Hands students plan to be teachers and study medicine or pharmacy, financial management, and computer programming. Many students come from heavily forested areas and plan to study forestry to return home and help preserve the beauty of their homeplace.

Population(s) Served

In Myanmar, we connect with 2 different areas through connections made with students here in Kentucky. Both areas, are under martial law and see many refugees flee due to the violence in the cities. We plan to continue as possible to support our Blessing Hands students and make sure they are able to receive an education. These areas have great need for basic infrastructure and even need assistance securing teachers for their students. Due to the remoteness of these 2 areas, we are regularly helping meet basic needs to ensure students can learn to read, write, and understand basic math concepts.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Certified as a Foreign Non-Governmental Organization in Guangxi Province, China 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We are regularly seeing students graduate and much of the Chinese Poverty Alleviation Program has decreased the needs in the rural areas we serve. Many students in Myanmar added.

Number of schools established in rural communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Families, Caregivers

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Partnerships with school administrators, mostly volunteers with meager stipend for travel required to communicate student needs and progress, who administer the funds to needy children.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Donations received are designated to specific students sponsored. General funds allow program development, such as school supplies. Management only became necessary as the budget surpassed 200,000.

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020 is an obvious increase due to a generous partnership with another foundation. scholarship amounts will fluctuate with the number and age of our students.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Programs shift students, but Blessing Hands goal is to see each student all the way through college. Some programs drop due to difficulty receiving funds. Some students drop due to moving.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Blessing Hands' ultimate goal is to encourage charities and volunteerism in China, Myanmar, Thailand, and the Philippines. In Mainland China, people wonder if charities are a scam or trying to influence China toward Western ideas. Lions' Clubs exist in large Chinese cities, but most charitable efforts are done by the government through their own approved channels. People are suspicious of government charity efforts. Our goal is to influence the students themselves to become informal volunteers and givers in their communities and schools. By requiring our older students to do 3 hours of volunteer service a semester, we open the idea that they can help society not just their own families. We want our students to be leaven to get the idea of the blessings of giving out into the groupthink. Every school and child we touch can see our open blessing hands coming from a foreigner. They begin to want to also give and help.

Teachers, scholars, government officials, and businessmen are catching the idea of charity and giving to their own poor. I hear them say that if a foreigner can come all this way to help their children, surely they can step up and help also. Our immediate goal is to improve the lives of students and keep them in school. Our larger goal is to grow our own charitable students who can take loving and caring for others wherever they go for the rest of their lives. We want them not just to become rich and prosperous, but to become kind and loving to those who are suffering as they once suffered. Even now, most thank you letters we get will say they want to do what we are doing someday. They say they want to spread love and concern as we do. They are very grateful.

In the next 3 to 5 years we hope to add small village schools in Myanmar where we can help 12 to 30 students who are in desperate need. These children will be from Mara minority remote groups In Maraland. We want the Mara themselves to take the initiative to help their own poor. We want to attract more sponsors and volunteers both overseas and within Myanmar and China that can communicate easily with their students and model charity in action. We want to encourage the establishment of more Myanmar charity boards overseeing what we do. People helping people one at a time can change the mindset to one of service. They can do a much better job of reaching out to their own communities in their own languages. Many students will have their dreams fulfilled and begin to dream different dreams of giving and loving the poor. We want to raise the literacy levels in remote rural schools and raise expectations but we want these expectations to also including giving and caring for others.

How will Blessing Hands encourage volunteerism, giving, and charities in our Chinese service areas? Blessing Hands has officially registered in China as a foreign NGO and maintains an assistant director there. We are registered with the Security and Education Departments of Guangxi Province and submit plans and our budget before we start our programs each year. We are modeling how a charity conducts itself with transparency and inspiration. We expect the high school students, not just the college students, to volunteer to help others. The college students report their volunteer activities, and we sometimes feature their accounts and pictures in our newsletters. The other students then get inspired and want to experience the same things. More volunteer stories need to be included in our newsletters. WeChat is the Facebook of China except it is more flexible and easy to share. We can easily interact with our students and encourage interaction and volunteerism there. It is not as easy to have summer camps anymore as China, and the USA and China are often disagreeing on trade and social issues, but students and volunteer teachers still welcome our help and influence.

As China retreats from foreigners, Blessing Hands is branching out into Myanmar and adding more students in the Philippines and Thailand. We are working with 3 Mara minority villages that have no electricity or roads and use barter and slash and burn agriculture. We expect to add two more villages this year and hope to add 70 more schools in the coming years. We are giving school supplies, solar systems, and other necessities to these children. Presently, we are sponsoring a 3-month English program for 90 students in two villages. This was suggested by the charity boards organized in our first two villages. Pastors, village elders, and teachers suggested this idea of how we could help. We have given three motorcycles to the schools and other needed items to improve their opportunities and open windows to the outside world.

A local 30-year-old college student, Bie Paw, who is a refugee in the USA from Maraland, has been handling our programs to help several villages. The closest city is Matupi, which is a 3-day walk. These villages are linked by language, kinship, and Christianity. Elders and pastors in these villages will oversee the implementation of the aid to the schools. An administrator will be paid a reasonable salary acceptable in the local economy for a college-educated person.

Our board has three Chinese members. These board members have resources in friendship circles, family connections, or financial blessings that make them valuable resources for our students and activities. Our staff members and volunteers in China also have extensive friendship and relative circles that are interested in helping their own poor rural students. Our staff uses their connections to introduce us to new volunteers and Chinese charities. Our board members, staff, and volunteers are proud of what we are doing and set an example of charity for others. We have good Chinese government relations especially in Yangshuo, since our city, Morehead, KY, is the Sister City of Yangshuo.

We join in joint projects with Morehead Sister Cities in Yangshuo, especially in art. We often have exchanges between the two sister cities including mayors and education officials. We have spent more than $238,000 over ten years for Yangshuo students and $27,000 on other activities. The head of their foreign office is Gloria Wei, our first administrator in Yangshuo in 2005. She has passed her Blessing Hands responsibilities to others, but still helps our students all she can. Yangshuo encourages Blessing Hands projects in Yangshuo.

Our visiting scholar friends are always excited to see us again when we come to China and are willing to help us with projects and initiatives. They sometimes collect books, used clothes, and school supplies for us to take into Yao minority areas. Some of them help us with driving or other transportation. Our own alumni also want to help and get involved. They are proud to be associated with Blessing Hands and want to be identified with a charity helping their people.

We are doing well financially. We have begun an endowment fund with the Bluegrass Community Foundation in Lexington and presently have over $113,604.08 invested there. We have also started a Blessing Fund there that can accept stocks and various other unusual donations. We have long time sponsors who are staying with their commitments and expanding their loyalty. One donor has a large farm that is earmarked for our charity when the time is right. Another has set up a charitable remainder trust for us. We also have a big contribution in 2020 of $122,000 from a family foundation that usually gives each year. As China's fortunes grow, Chinese donors are opting for giving of themselves rather than buying more luxuries. We see the potential for many more Chinese donors worldwide as the internet grows. We have partnerships with other international charities in China, especially Future Smile Foundation, which helps us give sponsorship to our own students, who are in other provinces where our official Guangxi registration is not honored.

In Myanmar, we have very enthusiastic village connections that want to help the Mara minority. In Thailand, Enhui School is growing and needs our help to continue to sponsor their children.

We are very satisfied with our progress for over 14 years. We are sponsoring 279 K- 12 students in China during the 2019-2020 school year. In addition, we have 42 Chinese students receiving Blessing Hands college scholarships in 2019-2020 and have given scholarships to 140 college students in 14 years. We have helped over 1,483 individual students in China, Myanmar, Thailand, and the Philippines. Many other students have received shoes, books, or school supplies but were not recorded by name in our records. Our first year's donations came to $55,061 in 2006. Our latest year showed $222,428 in donations.

We have gradually grown through the years and expanded our programs in China. Myanmar, Thailand, and the Philippines. We have a plan in the fall to begin to help Enhui School in Thailand sponsor 50 students. We also hope to increase the number of schools we help in Myanmar to at least 5 and maybe 75.

Our board attendance has been consistently 96% with board members attending meetings, volunteering, and donating with enthusiasm. We have not lost many administrators or volunteers in China and very few donors. Most of all we are seeing increased interest by Chinese and US citizens in participating as volunteers and donors in our programs.

We can see our students rising up to fulfill our dreams of being blessing hands to others. We can see our goal of modeling good charity practices making a difference. Yusui graduated from college in 2016 and has a good job. When she donated books to a poor school in Myanmar, she told me she has been helping 3 students with school needs for 4 years. She said, "Just like you did, I visit them every year, no matter how busy I am. It’s my honor to help people in need like you do. I really want to help them because seeing them is like seeing myself as a child. Knowing you is the luckiest thing in my life, so I also hope I can participate in the cause of love.” Her words thrilled me because they show we are growing compassion and empathy in our students

We get interviewed by Chinese and US journalists, who want to advertise our charity and its mission. We go through every open door, but we are really pleased when we find a teacher or official who is genuinely concerned for students and schools. We are quick to partner with them. Being a foreign NGO in China has its challenges. There are language, cultural, financial, and legal differences. The new NGO law implemented in China requires foreign NGOs to partner with Chinese security bureau units. We have officially registered in Guangxi Province and have good government relations. They cite us to other charities as good examples to follow. We have helped other charities also register by advising them on the best ways to do things under the Chinese charity law.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve poor students, families, and communities to help poor students obtain an education.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    family situations reported,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    One area faced recent political upheaval and many displaced children needed extra support. We focused on developing ways to help poor, displaced students in this area join the local schools.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    annual feedback helps us understand our students needs and communicate effectively with their respective sponsors.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Blessing Hands Inc
Fiscal year: Aug 01 - Jul 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

745.15

Average of 106.45 over 7 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

17.4

Average of 5.4 over 7 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 1% over 7 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Blessing Hands Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Aug 01 - Jul 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Blessing Hands Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Aug 01 - Jul 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Blessing Hands Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Aug 01 - Jul 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of Blessing Hands Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $44,062 $22,800 $63,453
As % of expenses 25.0% 11.6% 41.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $44,062 $22,800 $63,453
As % of expenses 25.0% 11.6% 41.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $220,208 $222,414 $215,752
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 1.0% -3.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.4% 1.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 99.6% 99.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $176,146 $196,480 $152,220
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 11.5% -22.5%
Personnel 2.3% 0.0% 3.2%
Professional fees 0.5% 1.3% 2.3%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 94.0% 90.3% 84.5%
All other expenses 3.2% 8.4% 10.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $176,146 $196,480 $152,220
One month of savings $14,679 $16,373 $12,685
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $190,825 $212,853 $164,905

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 10.0 10.6 17.4
Months of cash and investments 10.0 10.6 18.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 10.0 10.4 18.4
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020
Cash $147,175 $173,109 $221,015
Investments $0 $0 $15,944
Receivables $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Unrestricted net assets $0 $169,975 $233,428
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $3,134 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $3,134 $3,213
Total net assets $147,175 $173,109 $236,641

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Director and Founder

Mrs. Betty Cutts

Betty Cutts, our Founder/Director, has always been a volunteer interested in children and nations. Her first love is teaching. She has a B.S and a Master's Degree in Early Childhood Education. Kindergarten teaching was her career before she became a stay-at-home mother and community volunteer. She has been a Cub Scout leader, Meals on Wheels volunteer, a CASA (court-appointed special advocate for abused children), a hospital pink lady volunteer, a nursing home Bible teacher, a Sunday school teacher, a summer English camp teacher in China, and secretary of Morehead Sister Cities. She has also been the treasurer of Morehead Sister Cities for over 10 years. She is the mother of two adult sons, grandmother of two, and wife of David Cutts, a retired college physics teacher. She is a world traveler having visited Haiti, Honduras, Europe, China, the Middle East, Taiwan, India, and Russia. She was born in 1945 & has much experience with people and cultures.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Blessing Hands Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Blessing Hands Inc

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Betty Cutts

Blessing Hands

Term: 2028 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Eric Zhang

Community volunteer

Term: 2022 - 2028

Betty Cutts

Director of Blessing Hands

Eric Zhang

Community Volunteer

Xiaomin Oney

College teacher/treasurer

Jill Hill

community volunteer

Kayla Mitchell

Secretary

Joshua Barker

community volunteer

Malan Cai

Educator

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.