PLATINUM2023

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

Voice For Islamic Schools

aka CISNA   |   Princeton, NJ   |  cisnausa.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

EIN: 82-4114560


Mission

CISNA is an association of Islamic schools and educational organizations working to improve Islamic schools through accreditation, consultation, and professional development; advocating for Islamic education; and fostering professional relationships with educational institutions and agencies relevant to Islamic education.

Ruling year info

2018

President

Leila Shatara

Main address

35 County Road 518

Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-4114560

Subject area info

Education

Community and economic development

Islam

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Muslims

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

Islamic (X40)

Professional Societies, Associations (S03)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CISNA's strives to ensure that all children are provided with equitable opportunities to receive the highest levels of education so they can achieve their potential and become critical thinkers, future leaders and positive contributing members of society.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Islamic School Accreditation

CISNA works to improve the quality of Islamic education by promoting accreditation and requiring schools to follow best practices.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Muslims

Nurturing teachers and staff by providing timely and effective professional development is vital to sustained growth. CISNA offers growth opportunities in the areas of leadership, resource management and effective teaching and learning.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Muslims

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Multiracial people, Academics

Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes an Education Forum in Chicago and an Education conference in Los Angeles. Arabic and Leadership Academies.

Number of children who have a sense of their own feelings and an ability to express empathy for others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children

Related Program

Islamic School Accreditation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of students served by schools who are members of CISNA. CISNA standards require schools to incorporate programs that encourage DEI, character building and community service.

Number of administrators and staff who plan and experience professional development activities together

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Muslims

Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CISNA Board members and advisors who engage in board development and action planning.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Serve as a unifying organization for all Islamic schools.
Provide accreditation services on a global level.
Foster continuous improvement and excellence in governance, leadership, teaching, and learning at Islamic schools through professional development.
Advocate at the local, state, national, and global levels to ensure equitable access to resources for all students.

CISNA has developed research based accreditation standards.
CISNA provides professional development opportunities through webinars, conferences and individual consulting for schools in the areas of leadership, governance and teaching & learning.
CISNA has platforms to encourage collaboration and sharing of resources among school leaders, board members and teachers.
CISNA participates in the Worldwide Teach-In on Climate and Justice

The CISNA board comprises of experienced professionals who are committed to CISNA's mission.

The last five years have seen a dramatic increase in membership as well as the number of schools who have become accredited.
Principals from CISNA member schools have been recognized by NAESP as national Distinguished Principals in the last two years.
CISNA has conducted over sixteen webinars to help schools during the pandemic.
CISNA has advocated for services and resources for our students.
CISNA has become a founding member of the Global Association of Islamic Schools

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

Financial data

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: 2021

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Revenue
Contributions, Grants, Gifts $5,539
Program Services $0
Membership Dues $23,350
Special Events $0
Other Revenue $0
Total Revenue $5,250
Expenses
Program Services $500
Administration $18,000
Fundraising $0
Payments to Affiliates $0
Other Expenses $0
Total Expenses $5,514

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: 2021

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assets
Total Assets $0
Liabilities
Total Liabilities $0
Fund balance (EOY)
Net Assets $0

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Leila Shatara

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Council of Islamic Schools in North America

Board of directors
as of 02/23/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Dr. Leila Shatara

Noor-Ul-Iman School

Term: 2015 - 2023

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/22/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.