PLATINUM2024

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Until there is More Than Enough

San Antonio, TX   |  www.alliance4orphans.org
GuideStar Charity Check

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

EIN: 82-2119250


Mission

The Alliance serves and equips the church in fulfilling the Biblical call to care for children and families impacted by the foster care system.

Ruling year info

2018

Executive Director

Jennifer Smith

Main address

5804 Babcock Rd #172

San Antonio, TX 78240 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-2119250

Subject area info

Child welfare

Parent education

Aging out of foster care

Community and economic development

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

Parents

Caregivers

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children and families are in crisis in our community. Our community’s youngest, most innocent victims, abused and neglected children, are engulfed in the foster care crisis. They have no voice, no vote, no money, no relationships to rely on, and often no hope. Our community has an insufficient number of quality foster homes and adoptive homes, prevention and support services compounded by fragmented community efforts. Research tells us that the robust church network has the size and influence to efficiently and effectively play a huge role in solving the crisis. Therefore, the South Texas Alliance for Orphans (Alliance) exists to serve and equip churches in fulfilling the biblical call to care for children and families impacted by the foster care system (rev. 12/2017). Our vision is to see every child is a part of a safe and thriving family. Our mission fills the gap between the under-accessed church community and the overburdened local foster care system.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

More than Enough

The Alliance addresses the community need of insufficient number of foster and adoptive homes, prevention and support services compounded by fragmented community efforts. The Alliance fills the critical gap between the robust church network, the state's foster/adopt/kinship crisis and local orgazinations serving along various portion of the continuum including prevention, capacity and support. The evidence-based ministry model will serve and equip church communities to serve children and families involved in the foster care system.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of active church partnerships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, At-risk youth

Related Program

More than Enough

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Caregivers

Related Program

More than Enough

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Restrictions from Covid 19 limited the number of training events we were able to conduct and the number of people we could train in person.

Number of verified foster care short term babysitters

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

More than Enough

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In five years, we hope to achieve our goal of 100 Alliance supported church foster/adopt/kinship ministries with capacity to serve 1,000 children in foster care with a trauma-informed family, church body and care community. Families will be enabled to foster long-term, children will have stable, healing homes, and individuals serving in the care community will produce a natural funnel of future skilled foster homes. Long term we anticipate impacting other social sectors that are largely populated with adults who spent time in the current unstable foster care system as a child including the homeless population, juvenile justice system, prison system, teen pregnancies and sex trafficking victims.

We pursue our mission by raising up more than enough individuals and families from the largely untapped church community to serve in the three critical areas of prevention, capacity and support which impacts the entire foster care continuum of crisis pregnancy to aging out youth. We know from a robust body of research that a family environment improves healing, promotes normalcy in childhood and models healthy family life for children who have often never experienced it, while also being the most cost-effective solution. ​Our strategic collaborations with organizations serving in the three areas allows all members of the church an opportunity to understand the whole system and get involved and do something. Our ministry model also helps organizations recruit volunteers at little to no cost\nThe Alliance model is built utilizing evidence-based practice. The initial BUILD phase allows the church to Discover, Gather and Serve their CORE members already engaged along the foster/adopt continuum. The Alliance provides Ministry Leader Development and mentors the lay leaders in crafting care communities, which consist of veteran mentors, peer to peer support groups, verified babysitters and support families, for their CORE. After the CORE is supported, the Alliance leads churches into the GROW phase to Discover, Gather and Serve their Crowd, which is their church body. We provide training and guidance in crafting a Sunday sermon followed by an information meeting which informs the CROWD about the whole system, where each collaborative partner serves and allows them to connect with organizations serving in areas they feel their time, talents and resources can best serve. Lastly, churches serving their CORE and educating their CROWD can then trauma-informed the COMMUNITY. In this THRIVE phase, the Alliance ensures church staff, volunteers and care community members are continually educated in trauma-informed care. Trauma-informed volunteers are able to serve not only in their church but also in the COMMUNITY. Churches are also connected with kinship families, families at risk of having their children placed in care, caseworker appreciation and various donation drive events. THRIVE ministries can also serve as anchor churches in their community for the smaller or newer churches and their Long-term.

The Alliance has a history of a very high return on investment for the capacity and services it is able to provide and is poised to continue as we scale to meet the demands and needs of our whole community. We utilize volunteer lay leaders, collaborate with established organizations to prevent duplication of services, and utilize a ministry model founded on evidence-based practice. These practices produce a sustainable, renewable source of individuals and families from an under accessed robust church network full of individuals called to serve.\nOur staff are veteran foster/adopt families with extensive connections with churches, agencies, local child protective services and other local nonprofits. \nThe Alliance’s core program is the More Than Enough Initiative which seeks to support, equip and encourage 100 churches and their families to provide a family for every child in our community in five years. Through strategic collaborative relationships, it also serves to activate the whole church body into serving along the continuum from crisis pregnancy to aged out youth in the areas of prevention, capacity and support.\nWe utilize established relationships within churches to gain an audience with church leadership.\nCollaboration is critical to achieving the goals and mission of More Than Enough for children and families involved in the foster care system. We collaborate with excellent organizations, government entities, churches and nonprofits in our area serving at various places along the foster/adopt continuum. Collaborations are the best way to engage everyone in the church to do something while not overwhelming the church with programs to start or manage. It also serves to prevent costly duplication of services and funnels individuals to organizations already doing excellent work in our area. Several of our goals are dependent on our collaborative relationships. Our collaborative relationships serve to create a cohesive community that closes the cracks children have been falling through.

Since our launch in 2016 as a dba of San Antonio Marriage Initiative we have accomplished:\nLaunched and support 45 churches that are active in foster/adopt/kinship ministry \nFacilitated the Short Term Care Collaborative (Babysitting Collaborative) in verifying 411 foster babysitters\nFacilitated the presentation of the foster crisis to over 37,000 people through dedicated sermons and messages\nServed over 2,000 foster/adopt/kinship families through our Community Engagement (PNO, CONNECTED, Caseworker kits, trauma training)\nEquipped 200 child protective services investigative caseworkers with Caseworker Kits to serve the children they remove\nCollaborated with Threads and SA Grandparents Raising Grandchildren to create an event where 43 grandparents were able to give their 97 grandchildren two full outfits, shoes, backpack and toilietires.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

South Texas Alliance for Orphans
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 1.03 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.7

Average of 5.7 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 4% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of South Texas Alliance for Orphans’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $39,443 $50,361 $144,424
As % of expenses 19.2% 20.5% 45.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $39,443 $50,361 $144,424
As % of expenses 19.2% 20.5% 45.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $245,194 $326,294 $505,934
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 33.1% 55.1%
Program services revenue 1.7% 0.9% 0.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 8.8% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 98.3% 90.3% 99.7%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $205,751 $245,838 $318,382
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 19.5% 29.5%
Personnel 63.0% 69.2% 68.5%
Professional fees 19.5% 3.1% 2.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 17.5% 27.7% 29.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $205,751 $245,838 $318,382
One month of savings $17,146 $20,487 $26,532
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $222,897 $266,325 $344,914

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 10.3 10.1 13.7
Months of cash and investments 10.3 10.1 13.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 9.9 10.8 13.8
Balance sheet composition info 2020 2021 2022
Cash $176,265 $207,171 $364,662
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $300 $300 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 14.4% 0.0% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $170,136 $0 $0
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $170,136 $220,497 $364,921

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Jennifer Smith

Jennifer was born and raised in Odessa, Texas attended Texas Tech University for undergrad and University of Texas Health Science Center for her Master’s of Physical Therapy and has called San Antonio and Boerne home for 19 years. She and her husband have four children, two biological and two adopted from foster care.\nBack in 2005, an article in the paper about a young girl whose life was wrecked by abuse and neglect and subsequent moves through multiple homes in foster care lit a fire in her heart to “Do something!”\nDuring the next 8 years, while serving as a foster mom to children in the San Antonio area, Jennifer established and co-lead the Grace Point Foster and Adopt ministry for 5 years. During this time, Jennifer shared the model pioneered at Grace Point with 8 area churches with continued success and opportunity to refine the model. \nThe Smith’s also provide ongoing support to a kinship family of a previous foster placement.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Board of directors
as of 04/03/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Teresa McCaleb

First Presbyterian Church

Term: 2018 - 2024

Mike Sharrow

C12

Jeff Kantor

John Hopkins University

Melody McCrae

HEB

Virginia Lopez

Mark Caravajal

Caravajal Pharmacy

Aaron Banks

C12

Jennifer Smith

South Texas Alliance for Orphans

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes