PLATINUM2024

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Transforming lives through medical care

aka PfS   |   McLean, VA   |  www.partnerforsurgery.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

EIN: 54-2034427


Mission

To build partnerships that enable the ability to provide surgical care and other medical and prevention services to rural Guatemala.

Ruling year info

2001

President

Mr. Frank Peterson

Co Principal Officer

Todd Peterson

Main address

P.O. Box 388

McLean, VA 22101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-2034427

Subject area info

Health

Community and economic development

International development

Population served info

People of Central American descent

Low-income people

Extremely poor people

Farmers

NTEE code info

Surgery (G9B)

Community Health Systems (E21)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Guatemalan healthcare system presents high levels of fragmentation among its various public health institutions. It is collapsed and eroded by corruption, which results in poor coverage, medicines, infrastructure, and a lack of human resources—there are only 11 doctors for every 10 million inhabitants. With scarce central government revenue, there is little public investment. Partner for Surgery originated when Todd Peterson, a Peace Corps volunteer in the most remote areas of Guatemala, realized the need for surgical care but found that many of the villagers: lacked experience with medical care; feared health centers and hospitals; experienced discrimination because they were indigenous and poor; were unaware of the opportunities available to them; lacked the financial resources to pay medical bills; lacked access to transportation (many had never left their communities); spoke only their Mayan language and didn’t understand the Spanish spoken in hospitals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cleft Infant Nutrition Program

The Cleft Infant Nutrition Program is specially designed for children with lip and cleft palates. Due to their condition, it is common for these children to be unable to breastfeed and for their parents to access the formula or special bottles they need. Consequently, these children are severely malnourished and unfit for the surgery they need to correct their condition. The goal is to bring these children to good health to ensure they are ready for surgery. Health Promoters visit each patient enrolled in this program at least once per month to provide parents with a formula, show them how to use it effectively and monitor weight gain. This process takes one year on average. When it is time for surgery, the Health Promoter accompanies the patient and a family member to provide interpretation services and emotional support.

Population(s) Served
People of Central American descent
Extremely poor people
Working poor
Low-income people

Rural Medical Missions: 6-7 times a year, PfS sends teams of North American
doctors and nurses into rural, underserved and predominantly Maya communities
in Guatemala. They identify prospective surgical candidates – persons of all
ages who are afflicted with a medical a condition that threatens their life and/or economic viability, which can be corrected with surgery.

Population(s) Served

Our Health
Promoters live in the villages they serve, building trust locally
and bridging the language, distance, and cultural barriers. Employed by
our sister organization in Guatemala, Asociación
Compañro para Cirugía, these indigenous Guatemalans promote health care and health education in remote, rural areas and provide logistical support and
transportation to surgical candidates after they are identified by our Mobile
Medical Missions.

Population(s) Served
People of Central American descent
Extremely poor people

Surgical Missions operate at out-patient clinics that include well-equipped operating rooms, a PACU, a post-op area, and a large sleeping and eating facility that can accommodate patients and their families. PfS/ACPC coordinates the transportation of patients for surgery. Every patient is accompanied by a Health Promoter, who provides all necessary patient logistics (transportation, food, temporary housing).

Before, during, and after each surgical week, our health promotors provide culturally appropriate care and attention to patients and their families. Our focus and commitment to each patient begin from when we first meet them until we walk them back home after surgery.

Our patients can access surgical procedures for general surgery, Gynecology, Plastics surgery, orthopedic, etc.

Population(s) Served
People of Central American descent
Extremely poor people
Working poor
People of Central American descent
Extremely poor people
Working poor

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of patients undergoing surgical procedures

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Surgical Missions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patient consultations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mobile Medical Missions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Cleft Infant Nutrition Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Partner for Surgery’s goals include: \r\n\r\n-Improve Health\r\n-Empower Communities\r\n-Reduce Poverty\r\n-Overcome Barriers

++We pioneered the use of Health Promoters who live and work in the communities our patients call home. They understand the local language and culture, thereby building the trust our Medical Triage Missions need to deliver compassionate care. When the time comes, our Health Promoters accompany patients from their remote villages on their surgical journey and then back home again. \r\n\r\n++Many of our cleft babies are malnourished due to an inability to nurse, so we developed an Infant Nutrition Program. Rural midwives report cleft births to our community-based Health Promoters, who then visit the family home with specially designed nursing bottles for the little ones and breast pumps to their mothers. The Promoter then counsels the family on proper nutrition and care for the infant in preparation for cleft repair surgery. \r\n\r\n++We are building sustainable health programs for rural Guatemalan communities, as well as the infrastructure that enables them to access quality medical and surgical care. This includes sharing testimonials and videos that encourage community participation in healthcare activities and empower people to make decisions about their own health. We also empower youth to help their communities through rural radio programs. \r\n\r\n++We have formed multiple partnerships, including the Peace Corps, George Washington University, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Rotary International, a host of North American surgical teams, the Guatemalan Ministry of Health, and many corporate supporters in both North America and Guatemala.

Through our Guatemalan sister organization, Asociación Compañero para Cirugia (ACPC), we maintain a presence year-round in Guatemala. We operate surgical facilities in collaboration with ACPC. Our patients receive general and plastic surgery as well as specialized care from gynecologists, neurologists, and urologists. We provide nutritional counseling and assistance, followed by repair surgery, to infants with cleft lip and palate. We educate and improve health within communities.

++Our sister organization ACPC has begun to take steps to become self funding by publicizing the work they do and reaching out to corporate donors as well as wealthy individuals with Guatemalan ties in both their country and the North America. \r\n\r\n++In 2014 we will undertake a partnership with Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a world renowned pediatric institution, in an effort to reach more infants with cleft lip and palate.

Financials

Partner for Surgery, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 PFS 2022 AFS AUDIT 2021 239973 2010 audit 2010 2009 audit 2009 2008 audit 2008
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10.91

Average of 44.69 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.6

Average of 13.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Partner for Surgery, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$3,463 $13,818 $54,058 $79,918 -$72,157
As % of expenses -1.8% 5.4% 22.6% 30.7% -23.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$3,719 $13,818 $54,058 $79,918 -$72,157
As % of expenses -2.0% 5.4% 22.6% 30.7% -23.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $207,061 $259,410 $315,145 $331,813 $274,864
Total revenue, % change over prior year 20.3% 25.3% 21.5% 5.3% -17.2%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.5% 0.5% 0.5% 6.9% 0.8%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.5% 98.5% 99.5% 93.1% 96.9%
Other revenue 0.0% 1.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $189,761 $253,953 $239,690 $260,333 $313,727
Total expenses, % change over prior year 19.4% 33.8% -5.6% 8.6% 20.5%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 9.1%
Professional fees 17.3% 7.2% 10.3% 8.0% 5.3%
Occupancy 3.6% 3.0% 2.8% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 54.4% 60.4% 71.6% 42.9% 66.7%
All other expenses 24.6% 29.4% 15.4% 49.1% 18.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $190,017 $253,953 $239,690 $260,333 $313,727
One month of savings $15,813 $21,163 $19,974 $21,694 $26,144
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $205,830 $275,116 $259,664 $282,027 $339,871

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 9.4 6.9 10.2 9.3 7.6
Months of cash and investments 15.3 11.4 15.3 19.4 15.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 13.3 10.6 15.3 17.8 12.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $149,345 $145,274 $204,482 $201,192 $199,960
Investments $92,185 $95,883 $100,936 $220,657 $197,171
Receivables $1,176 $16,385 $13,633 $10,000 $10,000
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,810,448 $33,361 $943 $943 $1,026
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.3% 15.6% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.7% 5.8% 0.9% 0.6% 8.9%
Unrestricted net assets $238,332 $252,150 $306,208 $386,126 $313,965
Temporarily restricted net assets $26,199 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $26,199 $17,839 $37,884 $51,423 $56,750
Total net assets $264,532 $269,989 $344,092 $437,549 $370,715

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Mr. Frank Peterson

Frank retired from the U.S. Department of Navy as Director of the Hydrodynamics Department in 2000, specifically to develop a way to help impoverished Guatemalans access medical care. He spends half of his time in Guatemala overseeing operations and identifying areas for improvement, and half of his time in the U.S., recruiting medical teams and raising funds.

Co Principal Officer

Todd Peterson

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Partner for Surgery, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Frank Peterson

No affiliation

Todd Peterson

Frank Peterson

Pat Van Scoyoc

Beatriz Coningham

Edward Butler

Beatriz Coningham

Sally Turbyville

McNeill Gibson

Ellen Davis

Lawrence Coleman

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/10/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser