PLATINUM2024

Berkeley Food Network

Getting Food to People Who Need It

aka Berkeley Food Network   |   BERKELEY, CA   |  berkeleyfoodnetwork.org

Learn how to support this organization
GuideStar Charity Check

Berkeley Food Network

EIN: 81-4942342


Mission

The Berkeley Food Network seeks to end hunger and poor nutrition by using innovative, community-centered solutions to build a more sustainable, resilient, and equitable food system. We value community, equity, collaboration, sustainability, and innovation.

Ruling year info

2017

Executive Director

Andrew Crispin

Main address

1569 SOLANO AVENUE BOX 243

BERKELEY, CA 94707 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-4942342

Subject area info

Recycling

Public health

Food security

Community service

Food aid

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Homeless people

Low-income people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Recycling (C27)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nearly 1 in 4 residents of Alameda County are food insecure and have difficulty accessing healthy food reliably. Through partnerships and diverse distribution programs, Berkeley Food Network aims to strengthen the local food web to ensure there are convenient and reliable food access points for residents of Alameda County. Berkeley Food Network is providing food to our communities' most vulnerable residents - families with children, seniors, economically disadvantaged individuals, the unemployed or underemployed, among others - and are doing it with dignity, impact, and empathy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Hub Kitchen

We believe in cooking up creative solutions to reduce food waste. Our Hub Kitchen manager works with a dedicated group of volunteers each week to create delicious meals for community members. Recovered products that are less appropriate for individual consumption (e.g. 20-lb bags of potatoes) are used in our Hub Kitchen to produce roughly 3,000 individually packaged and frozen meals per month, thereby providing ready-to-eat meals for clients who may not have the capacity, equipment, or ability to prepare their own meals — such as seniors and homebound individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Seniors

We believe everyone should have access to healthy, high-quality, and culturally appropriate foods. By emphasizing client choice, we honor dignity and choice for people who use our services. We collaborating with community organizations that serve vulnerable populations to operate mobile pantry distributions. This helps us understand and serve our clients better. Feedback from partners and clients regularly emphasizes the need for healthy, high-quality produce and proteins–so we prioritize procuring those foods for our pantry programs.

Client-choice pantries are the primary vehicle through which we provide food. They are organized like farmers markets so clients can browse and select only the items they desire, thereby increasing individual choice and reducing food waste. In addition to our mobile pantry distributions, we offer a client-choice pantry onsite at our warehouse that is open 22 hours a week.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

We distribute food as a Redistribution Organization (RDO) for the Alameda County Community Food Bank, a formal designation that allows us to redirect food sourced from the Feeding America network to partner food assistance agencies in our immediate community for their own prepared meal and pantry programs. In addition to food from ACCFB, our partners are able to select food sourced through our Food Recovery Program and collectively purchase hard-to-access food items with us.

Population(s) Served

We believe excess food that would normally go to waste is a missed opportunity for producers and consumers alike.

By partnering with farms, retailers, restaurants, and other businesses, we recover over 60,000 pounds of excess food every month, thereby diversifying our sourcing to offer a greater variety of high-quality foods to our clients.

We recover food products at every level of the value chain, including farms, manufacturers and processors, grocers, and restaurants.
Gleaned fruits and vegetables add greater seasonality to our produce selections.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bags of free nutritious groceries and meals served to low-income households.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals served weekly.

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Families, Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Recovery Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As our food safety guidelines have become higher priority, the availability of donated or recovered food that meet this criteria has shrunk. However, our overall weight of donated has increased.

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food Recovery Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Food recovery efforts peaked in 2021 due to the pandemic and the wide variety of food items available. Berkeley Food Network refined food safety and food rescue guidelines in 2022 to be more strict.

Estimated dollar value of food donations distributed to community feedings programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Client-choice Pantries Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In dollars.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Redistribution Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric covers organizational partners throughout our service areas and ranges from distribution sites, such as schools, and food purchasing or donation partners, such as grocers

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Berkeley Food Network seeks to end hunger and poor nutrition by using innovative, community-centered solutions to build a more sustainable, resilient, and equitable food system. Our goal is to ensure that anyone in Berkeley or Albany, CA who is living with food and nutrition insecurity has access to high-quality nutritious food at no cost.

BFN was founded in 2016 to redesign hunger relief around grassroots partnerships. Before launching, BFN’s founders spent a year listening to community-based organizations in Berkeley and Albany to better understand the local landscape of food insecurity. These relationships laid the groundwork for our impact today; collaborating with partner agencies who are deeply engaged with communities in need to design and deliver services that maximize dignity, respect, and choice for the end client.

The Berkeley Food Network has 4 major areas of work:
1. Providing leadership for our network of 30 member agencies that provide food assistance or other services for the food insecure residents of Berkeley or provide resources for our work.
2. Operating a food sourcing and distribution warehouse using Alameda County Community Food Bank food, food recovered through our Food Recovery Program, and food sourced through other channels. This food is redistributed to other food assistance organizations in Berkeley and provides food for BFN's own programs.
3. Partnering with community organizations that serve vulnerable populations to provide mobile pantry distributions to populations not reached by existing food-assistance services at times and locations that are convenient to them; and operating our own pantry which is open consistent hours.
4. Running a robust food recovery operation that recovers edible food from the waste stream at a larger scale and more regularly than any individual member organization has the capacity to do.

Our food hub warehouse lies at the heart of BFN's work and will allow us to increase the quantity and quality of food available to BFN members and through our own distribution programs. We opened our food sourcing and distribution hub warehouse in September 2019 and became an official Redistribution Organization in June 2021.

Our Executive Director has earned a Masters of Science in Nutrition degree and has expertise in food security policy, public health programs, the management of food assistance programs, and creating grassroots relationships with the community. The staff at Berkeley Food Network have years of experience in food sourcing, fundraising, volunteer management, program development, and operations.

We have strong partnerships with our community partners, network agencies, the City of Berkeley, the Alameda County Community Food Bank, and our funders. As our organization grows, these relationships will continue to strengthen.

Berkeley Food Network has a volunteer base of over 500 volunteers per year that live locally, vote locally, and advocate locally. This grassroots volunteer group acts as our advocacy arm to raise awareness of food insecurity in a destigmatized way.

We have build a network of over 80 organizations that provide food assistance or other services to food-insecure residents of Berkeley or that provide resources to the Berkeley Food Network and our food assistance partners.

We have opened our 9,500 square food food sourcing and distribution warehouse and became a Redistribution Organization, authorized to redistribute food sourced from the Alameda County Community Food Bank. In 2021, we recovered nearly 700,000 pounds of excess food from local restaurants, caterers, grocery stores, farms, and food manufacturers.

We have grown our Mobile and On-site Pantry Programs to serve nearly 6,500 people a week.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Don't see clients on a scheduled basis, so hard to get wide range of responses.

Financials

Berkeley Food Network
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.66

Average of 419.80 over 5 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.7

Average of 4.2 over 5 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 8% over 5 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Berkeley Food Network

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Berkeley Food Network

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Berkeley Food Network

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Berkeley Food Network’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $160,905 $590,944 -$142,619 -$125,261
As % of expenses 67.1% 103.6% -10.2% -7.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $154,102 $571,788 -$179,510 -$165,990
As % of expenses 62.5% 97.0% -12.5% -9.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $407,992 $1,208,603 $1,410,170 $1,486,086
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 196.2% 16.7% 0.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 1.1% 1.3%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 99.9% 98.9% 98.7%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $239,929 $570,379 $1,404,456 $1,639,064
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 137.7% 146.2% 0.0%
Personnel 55.6% 52.9% 48.9% 56.7%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.3% 0.1% 3.2%
Occupancy 5.8% 3.9% 2.1% 8.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 38.6% 42.9% 48.8% 32.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $246,732 $589,535 $1,441,347 $1,679,793
One month of savings $19,994 $47,532 $117,038 $136,589
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $160,920 $73,956 $69,248 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $427,646 $711,023 $1,627,633 $1,816,382

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2023
Months of cash 3.2 12.7 4.7 0.7
Months of cash and investments 3.2 12.7 4.7 0.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.0 11.7 2.9 0.3
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2023
Cash $63,058 $602,121 $544,351 $96,196
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $5,400 $2,165
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $160,920 $234,876 $304,124 $304,123
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 4.2% 11.1% 20.7% 40.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 10.8% 0.0% 1.3% 20.9%
Unrestricted net assets $193,675 $765,463 $585,953 $218,844
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $47,280 $195,613 $5,083
Total net assets $193,675 $812,743 $781,566 $223,927

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2023
Material data errors No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Andrew Crispin

Andrew Crispin, the Executive Director of the Berkeley Food Network, brings personal experience and professional expertise to the fight against food insecurity. Born and raised in Manchester, New Hampshire, Andrew developed a personal understanding of the challenges faced by food-insecure families. Andrew has a background in scientific research, international education, hospitality, and public health. He has a wealth of experience in managing food assistance and relief efforts across the country.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Berkeley Food Network

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Berkeley Food Network

Board of directors
as of 05/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Deborah Lewis

Dona Boatright

Collaborative Brain Trust

Susan Choy

Retired

Mirna Cervantes

Multicultural Institute

Pam Gray

Caroline Bettendorf

Lynn Orme

Molly Vitorte

Rebecca Abravanel

Chuck Fanning

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/22/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/22/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.