PLATINUM2024

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Connect. Collaborate. Strengthen.Act

FRAMINGHAM, MA   |  metrowestnonprofit.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

EIN: 27-2249040


Mission

The MetroWest Nonprofit Network supports and strengthens the local nonprofit community by connecting people and their organizations to resources, expertise and each other. Connect. We believe in the power of connection. We act as a bridge between local nonprofits and the community including volunteers, businesses, funders, community agencies, higher education, students, and aspiring leaders. Collaborate. We believe in collaboration. We serve as a resource hub for local nonprofits by facilitating alliances as well as systemic partnerships that promote the sharing of best practices, solutions, and innovations. Strengthen. We believe strong nonprofits contribute to strong communities.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Leah K Parker-Moldover

Main address

PO BOX 1661

FRAMINGHAM, MA 01701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-2249040

Subject area info

Education

Voluntarism

Nonprofits

Community service

Human services

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Ethnic and racial groups

Religious groups

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MWNN programs respond to the needs identified by nonprofit leaders and staff in the community. According to data provided by the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network, there are 6,104 nonprofits in MetroWest. Of those, 3,076 reported revenue in 2020. 41% reported revenues below $99K. Many nonprofits in MetroWest are small, single-staffed, or all-volunteer organizations with small budgets. Their ability to pay for capacity-building opportunities is limited. MWNN's mission is to fill the gap. MWNN programming focuses on; providing free opportunities for staff to access expert knowledge, offering free interest-based affinity groups, facilitating collaborations with better-resourced organizations that can contribute to strengthening local nonprofits, and leading an effort to diversify the MW nonprofit leadership pipeline. MWNN programs include Free bi-monthly Lunch and Learn sessions, monthly Affinity group meetings with Lone Rangers and Volunteer Advocacy network.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lone Rangers

Monthly affinity group for leaders of nonprofit organizations tseeking support, guidance and resources

Population(s) Served
Adults

Collaboration with University staff and students to build connections to nonprofit organizations for next generation leadership opportunities, civic engagement and service learning.

Population(s) Served
Academics

This program is for individuals with diverse identities and lived experience who are interested in furthering their knowledge and skills as nonprofit leaders, aspiring and emerging leaders, mid-level nonprofit managers
individuals seeking to change careers and enter the nonprofit sector. This program is a twelve week course offered in the fall each year.

Population(s) Served

MWNN has launched an affinity group VANN, Volunteer Action Nonprofit Network – designedfVolunteer Program leaders who are building, implementing, or managing volunteer programs. Like our Lone Rangers affinity group, this will be a place to share issues, exchange ideas, discuss challenges and strategies and support each other. Each meeting will have a volunteer topic focus based on the needs and interests of the group. We’re so pleased that Polly Mendoza, former Executive Director of Neighbor Brigade and lifelong volunteer and nonprofit leader has graciously agreed to facilitate this group. Her passions and skills intersect in the areas of integrating equitable practices, managing, and leveraging volunteer corps, and innovative strategic planning. Polly worked with the Massachusetts Service Alliance and the MetroWest Nonprofit Network to complete the Service Enterprise training and successfully acquired certification for Neighbor Brigade. This group meets, virtually, once per month.

Population(s) Served

We’ve launched the Lunch and Learn: Let’s Talk About… series to connect you to each other and invited guests to dig deeper on topics that are timely and relevant. These will not be one-way conversations – no hour-long PowerPoint presentations, no drinking from a fire hose of information – just one hour to talk about the issues that are most important to you and your organization. We are intentionally building this program to be responsive and flexible. Lunch and Learn sessions are held on a bi-weekly basis on Wednesdays.

Population(s) Served

MWNN is proud to serve as a host organization for the Service Enterprise Initiative, https://www.mass-service.org/resources/service-enterprise, a program of the Mass Service Alliance and the Points of Light Foundation.

The Service Enterprise program helps organizations that want to create sustainable and strategic volunteer programs that have a greater impact on their communities. If you are interested in learning more or participating in an upcoming cohort, please email us at [email protected]

Participating organizations have received national certification.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

MWNN & FSU Certificate Program for Nonprofit Practitioners

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of evaluations conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of manuals produced

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of online groups served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MWNN is not a membership organization but considers its contacts, the numbers of people on our constituent list, as organization members for this instance.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

MWNN is a small backbone organization that has experienced significant growth over the last five years. The organization transitioned from a volunteer run, workshop delivery model to one with a full time executive director and a robust portfolio of programs, services and networking opportunities. We are not a membership organization we are open to all MW nonprofits (3,076 of whom reported revenue in 2020). Our current network includes 1700+ contacts and has steadily increased every year since 2016. Ultimately our goal is to have all nonprofits in MW part of the MWNN community.
MWNN is the leader in developing systems for effective collaborations and deepening the collective impact of the sector. MWNN has positioned itself as a trusted neutral community organizer and facilitator by engaging in projects that increase our visibility and our impact. this gives us enormous flexibility and opportunity to respond proactively to the needs of the nonprofit community and identify community challenges that would benefit from coordinated interventions on the part of the nonprofit community. MWNN has dedicated itself to serving as a thought leader on issues of social and racial justice. Our work in the development of the MetroWest Food Collaborative is an initiative to bring food justice into the food system conversation. Our work as a founding member of the MetroWest Care Connection is an initiative to provide comprehensive, streamlined, dignified, and culturally responsive services to vulnerable communities that are underserved. We are grateful to represent the voice of the nonprofit community in that effort.
MWNN leads the development of programs and opportunities to strengthen the pipeline of next-generation nonprofit leaders, with an intentional focus on supporting leaders of color and those with diverse life experience and intersectional identities. According to statistics provided by Candid, in 2012 the approximate percentages of the nonprofit workforce as a whole were - 82% white, 10% African American, 5% Hispanic/Latino, 3% other, and 1% Asian or Pacific Islander. While these percentages have increased slightly over subsequent years, they are still woefully inadequate. The leadership gap is real and will only be exacerbated as senior leaders who entered the nonprofit sector in the 1960s and 1970s begin to retire and look to hand the leadership reigns to the next generation. This tsunami of change has been predicted since 2006 when the article Daring to Lead - A National Study of Nonprofit Leadership was published, in which the authors stated, Racial and ethnic minorities represent a rapidly growing segment of the population, but executive directors are overwhelmingly (82%) white. Younger executives were just as likely to be white as their older colleagues, and newly hired executives were only slightly more likely to be people of color than the overall sample.
https://www.compasspoint.org/sites/default/files/documents/194_daring

We have actively been building our communications and visibility profile. MWNN is a founding partner with the Mass Service Alliance and Inspiring Service in a statewide effort to increase visibility and access to volunteer opportunities throughout MA via the website https://weconnectforgood.org –in addition to the statewide initiative MWNN has developed a targeted MetroWest specific website mwconnects.org. which will align with the state site. MWNN continues to build programming that is responsive and reflective of the needs of the community. The Lunch and Learn series, the Lone Rangers affinity group, the Service Enterprise program, the partnerships we have formed with local and statewide organizations, the expertise and resources we have intentionally created. MWNN is the leading organization MW nonprofits turn to when they want to connect, learn, and combine their voices for maximum impact. A steady focus on increasing visibility and outreach efforts are key to MWNN continuing to build its reputation, presence, and standing as a valued community asset.
Our collaboration with the Massachusetts Service Alliance which strengthens organizations that are building strategic volunteer programs has already yielded results. Programs reported that the training they received has already made a significant impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of their organizations. MWNN is an active participant in the Racial Disparities WorkGroup of the MetroWest Health Foundation, and served as co-leader of the series Anti-Racism Conversations: Actions Speak Louder than Words, launched in collaboration with our partners at Leadership MetroWest which focuses on bringing a diverse group of community members together to discuss issues of racism and its impact on education, the criminal justice system, communities, and people of color. Every project or initiative MWNN engages in is vetted through the lens of its core values, Connect, Collaborate, Strengthen, and most important of all Act. MWNN is committed to not only providing an environment that invites active collaboration but is also committed to actively engaging to lead, facilitate and coordinate efforts to achieve the highest level of impact possible.

MWNN, in collaboration with Framingham State University (FSU), launched the first Nonprofit Management Certificate for Practitioners in fall of 2021 with 25 students. The program was developed over a three-year planning process in collaboration with the FSU Department of Continuing Education and with the strong support of a MWNN Board program planning committee dedicated to this project. The program has been designed in response to a survey conducted of 103 MetroWest nonprofit leaders, staff and board members. More than 70 percent reported a need for career ladder programs for mid- and entry-level staff. Nationally the annual turnover in nonprofit leadership positions is between 18-22%, even higher for leaders of color. MetroWest is not unique. Anecdotally local Executive Directors report concerns that succession plans will be hampered by the lack of qualified candidates, particularly candidates of color who represent many of the constituencies that are served by local nonprofits. This exciting new partnership is training the region’s next generation of highly skilled nonprofit employees through workforce and leadership development.
A critical priority of this program is to increase the ethnic and cultural diversity of nonprofit staff and leadership in our region. Research conducted in 2019 by the Boston Foundation and the Barr Foundation (The Burden of Bias in the Bay State: The Nonprofit Racial Leadership Gap in Massachusetts; https://racetolead.org/ma-2019/) finds that “Massachusetts continues to follow national trends in its failure to promote, retain and support nonprofit leaders of color.” MWNN, whose programs and outreach specifically target and support emerging practitioners and their smooth entry to nonprofit roles, considers the diversity of each Certificate program class a key indicator of success.
MetroWest faces two significant challenges; the lack of an affordable, practitioner-focused professional development option for next-generation nonprofit leaders and a woeful lack of diverse representation at the leadership level of many MetroWest nonprofit organizations. The Nonprofit Management Certificate for Practitioners, the only program of its kind in MetroWest, has been intentionally designed to address these gaps.

Launched in 2021, the MWNN/FSU Nonprofit Management Certificate for Practitioners program has been enthusiastically received by graduates and the nonprofit community. The program is designed to support the professional development of a diverse group of next-generation leaders, facilitate the transfer of local knowledge from current to future leaders.
The program is designed to: support the professional development of a diverse group of next-generation leaders,
facilitate the transfer of local knowledge from current to future leaders contribute to strengthening nonprofit organizations by strengthening the people who lead them.
Seventy four participants have completed the program since 2021. The program is taught by local nonprofit leaders with lived experience in the MW sector. A robust community-supported sponsorship program ensures equitable access. contribute to strengthening nonprofit organizations by strengthening the people who lead them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 1.19 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.8

Average of 1.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 2% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $34,820 $27,450
As % of expenses 17.0% 8.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $34,820 $27,450
As % of expenses 17.0% 8.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $268,165 $327,817
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 22.2%
Program services revenue 10.8% 8.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 16.6% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 72.5% 91.9%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $204,618 $313,311
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 53.1%
Personnel 34.6% 26.1%
Professional fees 52.0% 57.3%
Occupancy 6.5% 4.2%
Interest 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 6.8% 12.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $204,618 $313,311
One month of savings $17,052 $26,109
Debt principal payment $7,500 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $229,170 $339,420

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2021 2022
Months of cash 8.8 5.8
Months of cash and investments 8.8 5.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 6.4 5.2
Balance sheet composition info 2021 2022
Cash $149,788 $151,743
Investments $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 8.4% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $108,510 $135,960
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $28,727 $15,783
Total net assets $137,237 $151,743

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2021 2022
Material data errors No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Leah K Parker-Moldover

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Metrowest Nonprofit Network Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Dr. Nancy Gaulin

Nancy Gaulin Private Practice LLC

Term: 2021 - 2023

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/6/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data