PLATINUM2023

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Opening doors to hope, help and new possibilities.

aka FAN   |   Bend, OR   |  https://familyaccessnetwork.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

EIN: 20-3534560


Mission

To offer assistance, possibility and hope to Central Oregon families in need by connecting them with crucial resources that will help children flourish in school and in life.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Julie N. Lyche

Main address

2125 NE Daggett Ln

Bend, OR 97701 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-3534560

Subject area info

Family services

Child welfare

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many families in our communities struggle to make it from day to day. Inadequate housing, hunger, health and mental health problems and unemployment all contribute to an ongoing cycle of poverty. FAN connects families with what they need to move past road blocks so that their children can stay in school and benefit from the advantages of a good education. FAN’s comprehensive network of services available in Central Oregon makes it extremely effective. FAN advocates improve the lives of nearly 8,000 children and family members in our community each year. Each day our advocates work to break the cycle of poverty by helping families access the resources they need to thrive.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

FAN advocates are located in all schools in Central Oregon and serve families living in poverty with children ages 0-18. Advocates work hand in hand with families to connect them to food, shelter, clothing, heating, school supplies, health services, or whatever the need. Advocates are knowledgeable about community resources available, as well as state and federal programs, and are in constant contact with local providers. FAN advocates help families connect to and navigate the often confusing social service system. FAN’s goal is to clear road blocks so that children are able to attend school ready and able to learn. FAN advocates support our most needy families, removing barriers and paving the way for a child’s success.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

1st Place, Best Nonprofit Serving Children 2022

Bend Nest Magazine

2nd Place, Best Nonprofit Serving Children 2021

Bend Nest Magazine

Best Large Nonprofit, SAGE Awards 2017

Bend Chamber of Commerce

Best Nonprofit, SAGE Awards 2010

Bend Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Nonprofit Association of Oregon 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2022 numbers are on-going and will be collected throughout the 2022-23 school year. Total here represents Q1 results.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2022 numbers are on-going and will be collected throughout the 2022-23 school year. Total here represents Q1 results.

Number of children who received school supplies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2022 numbers are on-going and will be collected throughout the 2022-23 school year. Total here represents Q1 results.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2022 numbers are on-going and will be collected throughout the 2022-23 school year. Total here represents Q1 results.

Number of children who receive new clothing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Advocates in Central Oregon schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2022 numbers are on-going and will be collected throughout the 2022-23 school year. Total here represents Q1 results.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

FAN supports provided to children and their family members are often life changing interventions, empowering families to address critical issues in their lives. Indirectly, FAN services benefit the schools, the student population, and the entire community. When basic needs (such as hunger) are met, students have more concentration and less behavioral issues in school. Rather than using valuable classroom time to address non-education needs, teachers will be able to spend more time teaching and students will benefit by having less distractions and more time learning. When children show up appropriately dressed, well-rested, well-fed, and ready to learn each day, all benefit.

It is critical to alleviate and mitigate stressors of poverty because studies show that living in poverty as a child can be detrimental to future well-being not only for the child, but for the community. Studies also show that education breaks the cycle of poverty. FAN's partnerships with social service agencies, churches, businesses, and individuals support children and families both educationally and from a health and wellness perspective.

The 27 FAN advocates provide a direct, convenient, and non-threatening way to support vulnerable children and families through connections to essential services in 65 school sites throughout Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson counties. Because of the long-established partnerships with so many local, social service agencies, FAN advocates can often address many needs for the entire family in a single visit.

At the beginning of each school year, the FAN advocates will work with incoming students to ensure that each child has adequate clothing and school supplies to start the year off on a good note. School supplies and backpacks are one of the greatest needs for FAN families; our community partners help provide the school supplies and our advocates make sure that all children have what they need to be successful in the classroom. Throughout the year, the advocate will also connect children and families to many other needs which are often seasonal like: winter coats, snow boots, and heating assistance as well as the ever-constant needs of jobs, housing, healthcare, and dental work.

Unique to Central Oregon, FAN is the only organization of its kind that works directly in the schools. Our FAN advocates are all school district employees, which is important when trying to reach the students slipping through the cracks. A teacher or staff member can connect a student to their FAN advocate instantly instead of going through the time consuming and sometimes shaming task of getting permission for services from a parent/guardian. FAN advocates are part of a student's school experience and just like a school counselor, are available when needed.

Our FAN advocates are a vital hub within the often confusing network of social services, working with nearly 100 community partners and creatively collaborating to provide families with resources. Not only do children and families rely on our advocates, but our community partners rely on FAN for referrals to their programs (including local mentoring, free dental clinics, and mental health services). What FAN provides Central Oregon is essential to the well-being of our communities.

Our community support, FAN advocates, and a track record of successful implementation make FAN uniquely qualified to serve Central Oregon. Additionally, FAN has extremely knowledgeable leadership, a FAN Steering Committee, and the FAN Foundation Board (a fundraising board comprised of 10 dedicated volunteers who work tirelessly to raise FAN program funds), all of whom ensure that FAN is fiscally sustainable and FAN services are operating efficiently and are successful at reaching Central Oregon's most vulnerable children and family members.

As pandemic assistance ends and cost of living increases, many families who were already struggling to recover are now at an even higher risk of falling into poverty. With the ongoing housing crisis continuing to stretch budgets in Central Oregon, FAN's services are crucial to ensure families remain housed, and children remain clothed, fed, and equipped for success in school. With our expansion into all three Central Oregon counties, we now serve all children (aged 0-18) and their families in Crook, Deschutes, and Jefferson counties. This expanded reach will provide a low-barrier resource within schools for families facing increased hardships, so they can stabilizing and regain self-sufficiency quickly.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve low-income children (aged 0-18) and their family members.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In order to avoid gaps in service, we greatly expanded our summer staffing for 10 weeks between the end of one school year and the beginning of the next. With many poverty-assistance programs facilitated through schools closed over the summer, we realized there was a need from our clients for continued support from FAN during this period. We also pivoted to provide a higher level of direct assistance for eviction prevention, heating assistance, and hygiene in response to our service population's intensified needs in the wake of the global pandemic.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Twice annually, we conduct anonymous client surveys. These surveys have allowed our clients to express opinions about our services they might not feel comfortable stating directly to their service provider, shifting power toward them by giving them a forum to speak candidly, suggest improvements, or tell us what is working well. Although our survey responses are overwhelmingly positive, we include an open-ended question on each survey that allows clients to voice any concerns they have with specific programming or staff shortfalls, so that we can address these issues quickly.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 0.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

27.2

Average of 22.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 1% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $370,409 $170,842 $935,764 $447,033 $1,221,159
As % of expenses 150.7% 52.2% 352.2% 143.3% 273.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $370,409 $170,842 $935,764 $447,033 $1,221,159
As % of expenses 150.7% 52.2% 352.2% 143.3% 273.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $552,389 $696,706 $692,131 $884,187 $1,764,094
Total revenue, % change over prior year 11.1% 26.1% -0.7% 27.7% 99.5%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 7.3% 6.0% 4.1% -0.1% 24.0%
Government grants 7.1% 3.4% 2.5% 3.4% 0.3%
All other grants and contributions 85.6% 90.6% 93.4% 96.7% 75.8%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $245,842 $327,060 $265,675 $311,852 $446,125
Total expenses, % change over prior year -21.5% 33.0% -18.8% 17.4% 43.1%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 26.4% 27.4% 0.0%
Professional fees 29.2% 26.0% 8.5% 0.5% 6.4%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 63.1% 65.1% 55.6% 63.5% 87.4%
All other expenses 7.7% 8.9% 9.6% 8.7% 6.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total expenses (after depreciation) $245,842 $327,060 $265,675 $311,852 $446,125
One month of savings $20,487 $27,255 $22,140 $25,988 $37,177
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $266,329 $354,315 $287,815 $337,840 $483,302

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Months of cash 27.8 29.4 42.5 43.1 27.2
Months of cash and investments 51.7 52.5 84.9 94.4 101.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 31.1 29.7 78.8 84.3 91.8
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Cash $570,480 $801,945 $940,314 $1,120,802 $1,011,942
Investments $489,682 $627,863 $940,185 $1,332,032 $2,758,861
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $637,865 $808,707 $1,744,471 $2,191,504 $3,412,663
Temporarily restricted net assets $422,297 $621,101 $136,028 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $422,297 $621,101 $136,028 $261,330 $358,140
Total net assets $1,060,162 $1,429,808 $1,880,499 $2,452,834 $3,770,803

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Julie N. Lyche

Julie Lyche has lived and worked in Central Oregon for more than 20 years and has been the Executive Director of the Family Access Network since 2005. She has worked with community agencies for over 23 years, focusing on issues involving children and families. She is passionate about strengthening local, regional, and state partnerships to better serve our disadvantaged children, teens and families. Julie believes that the strength in FAN lies with the relationships between FAN advocates, local social service partners and families. FAN advocates are able to meet families within a non-threatening school environment to help eliminate barriers to a child's success in school. Julie feels privileged to work in an organization that helps children receive an education and break the cycle of poverty.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

FAMILY ACCESS NETWORK FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Lauren Olson

Cascade Insurance Center

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Natasha "Tasha" McFarland

Asset Analyst, Auditor, Writer

Term: 2019 -

Brooke Garcia (Ex Officio)

Brooke Garcia Property Management

Alisa Betz (Ex Officio)

High Desert Education Service District

Marianna Frisinger (Secretary/Treasurer)

OnPoint Community Credit Union

Aaron Warnock

Community Volunteer

Valerie Yost (Ex Officio)

Brooks Resources

Travis Browning

First Interstate Bank

Kate Drummond

Comagine Health

Erin Foote Morgan

FM Civic

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/31/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.