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Marion Community Foundation

For You For Marion. Forever.

Marion, OH   |  www.marioncommunityfoundation.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Marion Community Foundation

EIN: 31-4446189


Mission

Our mission is to continually improve the Marion area community through philanthropy, leadership, and civic engagement.

Ruling year info

2000

Principal Officer

Dean L. Jacob

Vice President

Ms. Julie Prettyman

Main address

Marion Community Foundation 504 South State Street

Marion, OH 43302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-4446189

Subject area info

Philanthropy

Foundations

Community improvement

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Ethnic and racial groups

NTEE code info

Community Foundations (T31)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Any charitable cause.

Marion Community Foundation has 430+ named endowment funds which award grants and scholarships. Awards vary in size depending on the fund size and type and benefit a variety of charitable causes in the community, per the wishes of our donors. We offer three grant programs in support of the residents of Marion, Ohio; Community Grants for local nonprofits and charities, TEACH Grants for classroom teachers, and Racial Equity & Justice grants to further issues of equity and justice in the community. Our annual scholarship program makes awards from 140+ scholarship funds to area high school seniors and graduates pursuing higher education.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Foundations Accredited

Council on Foundations National Standards 2008

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    As a community foundation, we provide grants to local nonprofits, charities, and schools. We also offer a robust scholarship program for area high school seniors and graduates. By extension, we serve the populations served by our area's nonprofits, in the areas of health & wellness; arts, history and culture; ecconomic development; education; environment; children, families, and seniors; food, shelter, and support; and faith-based organizations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    personal contacts and grantee progress reports,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Affordable childcare is a pressing community issue; we are a founding member of our community's Childcare Share Coalition.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Marion Community Foundation
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2022 Marion Community Foundation
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.65

Average of 10.49 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.1

Average of 4.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19%

Average of 20% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Marion Community Foundation

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Marion Community Foundation

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Marion Community Foundation

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of Marion Community Foundation’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$1,513,476 $2,927,128 $2,122,193 $6,513,066 -$57,811
As % of expenses -78.4% 148.9% 95.4% 299.0% -2.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$1,515,097 $2,925,090 $2,118,664 $6,510,314 -$60,184
As % of expenses -78.5% 148.7% 95.1% 298.5% -2.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,198,580 $2,256,023 $4,000,510 $8,284,990 $2,977,971
Total revenue, % change over prior year -39.1% 88.2% 77.3% 107.1% -64.1%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 52.7% 33.6% 21.6% 11.7% 34.6%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 51.6% 44.4% 30.1% 71.4% 35.6%
Other revenue -4.3% 22.1% 48.3% 16.9% 29.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,929,667 $1,965,603 $2,224,641 $2,178,307 $2,685,553
Total expenses, % change over prior year -23.4% 1.9% 13.2% -2.1% 23.3%
Personnel 13.2% 13.9% 14.0% 14.8% 12.9%
Professional fees 13.8% 14.5% 13.7% 14.1% 11.7%
Occupancy 1.2% 1.0% 0.9% 1.0% 0.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 66.5% 64.4% 65.2% 62.8% 70.0%
All other expenses 5.3% 6.2% 6.3% 7.4% 4.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,931,288 $1,967,641 $2,228,170 $2,181,059 $2,687,926
One month of savings $160,806 $163,800 $185,387 $181,526 $223,796
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $2,926 $7,951 $0 $2,410
Total full costs (estimated) $2,092,094 $2,134,367 $2,421,508 $2,362,585 $2,914,132

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 3.3 4.1 6.4 5.1 7.1
Months of cash and investments 242.0 255.9 239.4 280.4 228.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 214.1 228.1 212.9 253.3 205.2
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $536,176 $664,861 $1,182,764 $923,292 $1,599,328
Investments $38,386,062 $41,253,683 $43,199,839 $49,975,246 $49,606,241
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $12,343 $15,260 $23,212 $35,944 $38,294
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 62.3% 63.7% 57.1% 71.8% 74.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 11.6% 10.9% 11.1% 9.7% 10.4%
Unrestricted net assets $34,438,345 $37,363,435 $39,482,099 $45,992,413 $45,932,229
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $34,438,345 $37,363,435 $39,482,099 $45,992,413 $45,932,229

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Dean L. Jacob

Dean L. Jacob is Marion Community Foundation\u2019s President and Chief Executive Officer, following careers in law and education. He is a graduate of River Valley High School in Marion County. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Notre Dame and a Juris Doctor degree from The Ohio State University College of Law. He had been an attorney in private practice since 1986, concentrating much of his practice in estate planning and probate. In 1998, Dean changed to a part-time law practice and became a teacher at River Valley Middle School. He is active in the community having previously served as president of the Rotary Club of Marion, Marion County Bar Association, Marion Noon Kiwanis, the River Valley Education Foundation, and St. Mary Parish Pastoral Council, and a past member of the board of directors of United Way of Marion County, the Marion Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Wopat Family YMCA.

Vice President

Julie Prettyman

Julie Prettyman is Vice President/Director of Programs for Marion Community Foundation. Julie earned a bachelor\u0027s degree in business marketing from The Ohio State University. Julie has previous experience with volunteer development, grants program management, and donor relations at the Ohio 4-H Foundation. She has an extensive background in marketing and communications, project management and office administration, organization and process development, and strategic and business planning. In addition to the Ohio 4-H Foundation, her career includes positions at CT Consultants (formerly Floyd Browne Group), Goodwill, March of Dimes, and The Ohio State University Marion.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Marion Community Foundation

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Marion Community Foundation

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Marion Community Foundation

Board of directors
as of 01/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Francis Voll

retired educator

Term: 2022 - 2023

Kathy Goodman

Educator, retired

Scott Knowles

Sims Bros Recycling

Fran Voll

retired educator

Jody Demo-Hodgins

Social Services, retired

Ryan McCall

Marion Technical College

Chuck Speelman

Tri-Rivers Career Center

Nicolle Wampler

Marion Correctional Institution

Grant Gates

Morral Companies

Kevin Smith

The First Citizens National Bank

Matthew Frericks

Marion County Court of Common Pleas

Spencer Mathews

Mathews Ford Marion

Jackie Peterson

Logos Ministries

Sarah Rassell

Wilson Bohannan

Tom Schifer

architect

Erin Slater

Ohio State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.