PLATINUM2023

Neurodiversity Works

Preparing neurodiverse students for careers in the drone industry

Commerce City, CO   |  http://www.neurodiversityworks.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Neurodiversity Works

EIN: 85-1377655


Mission

Our mission at Neurodiversity Works is to support and empower individuals with unique neuro-differences, such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, in their pursuit of careers in the drone industry. We believe that neurodiversity should be celebrated and not viewed as a disability. Nearly 25% (1 in 4) of the population is neurodiverse, yet there is an 85% under/unemployment rate in the neurodiverse workforce. Our programs are designed to help these individuals reach their full potential and succeed in the workforce.

Notes from the nonprofit

As an autistic drone scientist with 12 years of experience in the industry, Jason has a unique understanding of the challenges and opportunities that individuals with neurodiversity may face in this field. His professional credentials, including a Master of Engineering from the University of Colorado and certifications as an ASPRS Certified UAS Mapping Scientist, Certified GIS Professional, Level 3 Thermographer, and AUVSI Trusted Remote Pilot, make him well-suited to be a leader in this field. Nicole, is mom to her son with autism and has a degree in Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences from Metro State University of Denver, also has a personal connection to the neurodiversity community and a deep understanding of the needs and challenges faced by individuals with neurodiversity and their families. She is an effective advocate for this community and serves as a leader in efforts to support their well-being and success, including serving as co-chair of the DEI committee for the city.

Ruling year info

2020

Co-Founder

Nicole Corder

Co-Founder

Jason San Souci

Main address

11475 Helena Street

Commerce City, CO 80022 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-1377655

Subject area info

Autism

Job training

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Young adults

People with disabilities

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Autism (G84)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MISSION Our mission at Neurodiversity Works is to support and empower individuals with unique neuro-differences, such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, in their pursuit of careers in the drone industry. We believe that neurodiversity should be celebrated and not viewed as a disability. Nearly 20% of the population is neurodiverse, yet there is an 85% under/unemployment rate in the neurodiverse workforce. Our programs are designed to help these individuals reach their full potential and succeed in the workforce.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Drone Career Program

Our mission at Neurodiversity Works is to support and empower individuals with unique neuro-differences, such as autism, ADHD, and dyslexia, in their pursuit of careers in the drone industry. We believe that neurodiversity should be celebrated and not viewed as a disability. Nearly 25% of the population is neurodiverse, yet there is an 85% under/unemployment rate in the neurodiverse workforce. Our programs are designed to help these individuals reach their full potential and succeed in the workforce.

In order to fulfill our mission, we have several initiatives in place. We provide comprehensive workforce development programs that prepare students for successful careers in the drone industry. Our programs are designed to foster inclusivity and support the unique strengths and talents of neurodiverse individuals, helping them to achieve their full potential in this rapidly growing field. We partner with local families, School to Work Alliance Programs and other partners.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adolescents

Where we work

Awards

DEI Award 2022

Denver Business Journal

Affiliations & memberships

Colorado Neurodiversity Chamber of Commerce 2023

Colorado Nonprofit Association 2023

Vice Chair - DEI Committee for the city of Commerce City, CO 2023

Co-Chair JFK Partners - CU-AMC 2023

FAAST DronePROFAAST DronePRO Federal Aviation Administration 2023

AI2ES Industry Advisory Board MemberAI2ES Industry Advisory Board Member National Science Foundation 2023

Airborne Remote Sensing Data Quality Technical Working Group AdvisorAirborne Remote Sensing Data Qua 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities, Low-income people

Related Program

Drone Career Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Young adults, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities, Low-income people

Related Program

Drone Career Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients passing job skill competency exams or assessments after completing course

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Unemployed people, People with other disabilities

Related Program

Drone Career Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Drone Career Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

INITIATIVES
In order to fulfill our mission, we have several initiatives in place. We provide comprehensive workforce development programs that prepare students for successful careers in the drone industry. Our programs are designed to foster inclusivity and support the unique strengths and talents of neurodiverse individuals, helping them to achieve their full potential in this rapidly growing field. To accomplish this, we partner with local families, School to Work Alliance Programs, Career Technical Education programs, and other support and advocacy organizations.

Neurodiversity Works Drone Career Exploration Workshops - The first step of our program, which provides participants with an introduction to the drone industry. The workshop covers topics such as the industry overview, training and educational requirements, current use cases, and the tools of the trade. Our workshops are offered quarterly through various school-based and work-based programs like the Special Olympics, ACEConnect, 18-21 Transition Program, and African-American Equity Task Force. The workshops can be conducted in-person or virtually through an online meeting platform like Zoom.

The program continues with field trips to observe commercial drone operations in the local area.

Participants will have the opportunity to see a real-life drone operation, interact with the crew, and get hands-on experience. Field trip locations are chosen to be easily accessible by public transportation. Participants over the age of 16 years old can earn their FAA Part 107 certification and become licensed commercial drone pilot apprentices through our US Department of Labor Registered Drone Apprenticeship Program. Starting a career in drones does not necessitate a college degree, instead, certification and obtaining a Part 107 license are the key requirements. Accommodations are also available.



Participants will have the opportunity to see a real-life drone operation, interact with the crew, and get hands-on experience. Field trip locations are chosen to be easily accessible by public transportation. Participants over the age of 16 years old can earn their FAA Part 107 certification and become licensed commercial drone pilot apprentices through our US Department of Labor Registered Drone Apprenticeship Program. Starting a career in drones does not necessitate a college degree, instead, certification and obtaining a Part 107 license are the key requirements. Accommodations are also available.

Our target audience for this program is students between the ages of 16 and 25. This program is important because it addresses the critical disconnect between the potential of neurodivergent individuals and the high unemployment rates among this population. Our program provides students with a supportive environment to develop their interests, express themselves creatively, and build relationships with industry mentors while gaining valuable knowledge and skills that can be applied in various industries. The positive outcomes of this program include decreased social isolation, improved psychological health and quality of life, increased independence, higher rates of positive employment and educational achievement, strengthened social structures, and transferable skills. Nearly 25% (1 in 4) of the population is neurodiverse, yet there is an 85% under/unemployment rate in the neurodiverse workforce. Our programs are designed to help these individuals reach their full reach their full potential and succeed in the workforce.

Jason San Souci and Nicole Corder are both co-founders, key staff and actively involved in the neurodiversity community, making them proximate leaders in efforts to support and empower individuals with neurodiversity.
As an autistic drone scientist with 12 years of experience in the industry, Jason has a unique understanding of the challenges and opportunities that individuals with neurodiversity may face in this field. His professional credentials, including a Master of Engineering from the University of Colorado and certifications as an ASPRS Certified UAS Mapping Scientist, Certified GIS Professional, Level 3 Thermographer, and AUVSI Trusted Remote Pilot, make him well-suited to be a leader in this field.
Nicole, is mom to her son with autism and has a degree in Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences from Metro State University of Denver, also has a personal connection to the neurodiversity community and a deep understanding of the needs and challenges faced by individuals with neurodiversity and their families. She is an effective advocate for this community and serves as a leader in efforts to support their well-being and success, including serving as co-chair of the DEI committee for the city of Commerce City and family co-chair for JFK partners - CU Anschutz.
Overall, Jason and Nicole's direct connection to and involvement in the neurodiversity community give them a unique perspective and understanding of the needs and priorities of this community, making them effective leaders in efforts to support and empower individuals with neurodiversity.

We continue to reach neurodiverse students through career development workshops with school districts and community partners. We are working with students on apprenticeships, as well.
We collaborate with several organizations and community partners.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve neurodiverse students who are interested in careers in the drone industry. This program is important because it addresses the critical disconnect between the potential of neurodivergent individuals and the high unemployment rates among this population. Our program provides students with a supportive environment to develop their interests, express themselves creatively, and build relationships with industry mentors while gaining valuable knowledge and skills that can be applied in various industries. Nearly 25% (1 in 4) of the population is neurodiverse, yet there is an 85% under/unemployment rate in the neurodiverse workforce.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As nonprofits spearheading uncrewed industry accommodations and accessibility for disabled people, Drone Forward Incorporated (DFI) and Neurodiversity Works have partnered to advocate and create resources for the disabled community. The first of these resources is this comprehensive guide to the current accommodations that the FAA offers disabled people seeking to take the Part 107 exam.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We adjust our programs and outreach methods quarterly based on student feedback.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Neurodiversity Works

Financial data

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Neurodiversity Works

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Revenue
Contributions, Grants, Gifts $60,000
Program Services $0
Membership Dues $0
Special Events $0
Other Revenue $0
Total Revenue $60,000
Expenses
Program Services $30,000
Administration $10,000
Fundraising $0
Payments to Affiliates $0
Other Expenses $0
Total Expenses $10,000

Neurodiversity Works

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assets
Total Assets $8,500
Liabilities
Total Liabilities $0
Fund balance (EOY)
Net Assets $11,500

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Founder

Nicole Corder

Nicole, is mom to her son with autism and has a degree in Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences from Metro State University of Denver, also has a personal connection to the neurodiversity community and a deep understanding of the needs and challenges faced by individuals with neurodiversity and their families. She is an effective advocate for this community and serves as a leader in efforts to support their well-being and success, including serving as co-chair of the DEI committee for the city of Commerce City and family co-chair for JFK partners - CU Anschutz. Nicole's direct connection to and involvement in the neurodiversity community gives her a unique perspective and understanding of the needs and priorities of this community, making her an effective leader in efforts to support and empower individuals with neurodiversity.

Co-Founder

Jason San Souci

As an autistic drone scientist with 12 years of experience in the industry, Jason has a unique understanding of the challenges and opportunities that individuals with neurodiversity may face in this field. His professional credentials, including a Master of Engineering from the University of Colorado and certifications as an ASPRS Certified UAS Mapping Scientist, Certified GIS Professional, Level 3 Thermographer, and AUVSI Trusted Remote Pilot, make him well-suited to be a leader in this field. Jason's direct connection to and involvement in the neurodiversity community gives him a unique perspective and understanding of the needs and priorities of this community, making him an effective leader in efforts to support and empower individuals with neurodiversity.

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Neurodiversity Works

Board of directors
as of 02/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Nicole Corder


Board co-chair

Jason San Souci

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/16/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/21/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.