PLATINUM2024

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

America's Aero Club

Washington, DC   |  https://naa.aero
GuideStar Charity Check

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

EIN: 53-0196615


Mission

The NAA is a federally recognized 501c3 whose mission is to oversee the advancement of the art, sport, and science of aviation and space flight. The NAA achieves this by fostering opportunities to participate fully in aviation activities and promoting public understanding of the importance of aviation and space flight in the United States.

Ruling year info

1942

Principal Officer

Amy Spowart

Main address

1 Reagan National Airport General Aviation Terminal, Hangar 7

Washington, DC 20001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0196615

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Education

Science

Community and economic development

International relations

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

NTEE code info

Other Medical Research N.E.C. (H99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The NAA's mission is to oversee the advancement of the art, sport, and science of aviation and space flight. The NAA achieves this by fostering opportunities to participate fully in aviation activities and promoting public understanding of the importance of aviation and space flight in the U.S. What we do: *Develop opportunities to strengthen the mutual objectives of NAA members; *Represent U.S. aviation throughout the world as the U.S. National Air Sport Control (NAC) of the Federation Aeronautique Internationale; *Encourage, coordinate, document, and competition aviation and space events following the rules prescribed by the FAI; *Recognize and reward those who make outstanding contributions to the advancement of aerospace; *Endorse sound national programs and other efforts designed to help the U.S. remain a leader in aerospace; *Support and encourage aviation and space education programs; *Promote and encourage public participation in and appreciation of U.S. aerospace.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Aeronautic Records and Awards

For almost the entire history of powered flight, NAA has been the caretaker of many of the nation's and the world's most prestigious aviation awards. NAA's mission is to identify and recognize those who have contributed to the art, sport, and science of aviation and space flight to the United States.

We appreciate that people and groups like receiving recognition for their hard work and we believe they deserve it. When achievement is rewarded, several things happen.

Entities that earned it are provided with a vital boost to continue in their excellence.
Winners gain a sense of fulfillment.
Public recognition inspires otherstoday's success drives future success.

Motivation is what pushes people. Giving recognition for achievement creates a positive atmosphere and helps keep the entire aerospace industry moving forward.

The NAA creates positive opportunities to reward achievement and propel continued excellence in every sector of aviation.

Population(s) Served

Air Sport Organizations (ASO) are integral to the NAAs ability to fulfill our mission.
Many ASOs serve as the introduction or gateway to commercial and business aviation. They are also competitive disciplines to many Americans and lifelong hobbies to thousands more. To foster our relationship with ASOs, the NAA works closely with ASOs to encourage membership and help drive innovation. Americas ASOs constantly change and evolve as new technology and aircraft become available.

Tens of thousands of people belong to ASOs in the United States, representing aerobatics, aeromodelling, ballooning, gliding, helicopters, ultralights, and parachuting.

NAA delegates each ASO as the official governing body for their respective air sports. NAA and the ASOs meet regularly, which helps produce a better understanding of each organization's unique challenges. This cooperation also prepares the NAA for its representational responsibilities with the FAI.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number is shown as a percentage of the Board who gave financially to the organization.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of the NAA are to:
*Drive excellence with recognition, including through contests, awards, and trophies.
*Sanction and bestow authority to Americans representing the best in International Air Sports.
*Promote and foster appreciation for the art of flying and strengthen the aerospace business.
*Encourage the study, establishment, and deeper understanding of the science of aeronautics in all forms to encourage inventions and improvements in the field and across the industry.
*Assist in ensuring a sustainable and reliable aviation system.

The strategies of the NAA to achieve our strategic goals are:
*Continue to nurture current members, thoughtfully attract new members, and build a membership united around the NAA's mission to promote and advance American aeronautics.
*Build on our current records and award programs to ensure awareness of the opportunities and that programming reflects the future of aerospace.
*Capture the brightest insight on sustainable aviation and promote and drive achievements that lead toward that goal.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.28

Average of 12.89 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.7

Average of 7.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $77,037 -$9,026 $55,920 $39,254 -$69,543
As % of expenses 7.1% -0.8% 5.8% 4.1% -7.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $76,403 -$9,593 $41,419 $23,957 -$84,981
As % of expenses 7.1% -0.9% 4.3% 2.5% -8.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,193,511 $1,093,545 $974,773 $1,016,768 $970,052
Total revenue, % change over prior year 18.4% -8.4% -10.9% 4.3% -4.6%
Program services revenue 56.6% 50.1% 33.1% 40.8% 49.6%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.0% 1.6% 1.2% 0.9% 1.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 6.4% 5.6% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 37.6% 43.3% 45.4% 44.3% 48.8%
Other revenue 4.8% 5.0% 13.9% 8.5% 0.5%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,078,432 $1,106,364 $956,552 $962,527 $996,284
Total expenses, % change over prior year 10.3% 2.6% -13.5% 0.6% 3.5%
Personnel 49.3% 51.3% 59.0% 58.5% 58.2%
Professional fees 6.6% 5.8% 6.7% 6.4% 6.6%
Occupancy 5.4% 6.0% 7.5% 6.4% 6.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 38.6% 36.9% 26.8% 28.6% 29.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,079,066 $1,106,931 $971,053 $977,824 $1,011,722
One month of savings $89,869 $92,197 $79,713 $80,211 $83,024
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $1,520 $23,231 $50,414 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,170,455 $1,222,359 $1,101,180 $1,058,035 $1,094,746

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 6.4 7.3 7.0 7.2 6.7
Months of cash and investments 11.4 13.7 15.7 16.7 13.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 9.1 8.5 9.9 10.3 9.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $573,085 $670,371 $557,229 $574,244 $559,155
Investments $454,345 $589,387 $694,757 $762,797 $552,120
Receivables $150,133 $43,129 $109,061 $95,701 $89,010
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $25,390 $48,622 $90,118 $91,434 $92,848
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 93.2% 49.8% 33.1% 49.3% 65.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 6.1% 9.6% 9.6% 9.0% 8.3%
Unrestricted net assets $817,269 $807,676 $849,095 $873,052 $788,071
Temporarily restricted net assets $300,634 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $300,634 $397,344 $451,760 $495,362 $382,490
Total net assets $1,117,903 $1,205,020 $1,300,855 $1,368,414 $1,170,561

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Amy Spowart

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

National Aeronautic Association of U S A Inc

Board of directors
as of 01/28/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Jim Albaugh

Samantha Magill

NASA

Elizabeth Matarese

FAA (Retired)

Sierra Grimes

National Business Aviation Association

Robert DeForge

Raytheon Technologies

Pete Bunce

General Aviation Manufacturers Association

Leda Chong

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Liana Sucar-Hamel

Airbus Americas

Arthur W. Greenfield, Jr.

NAA Contest & Records Director

Rich Hanson

Academy of Model Aeronautics

Chris Hart

Hart Solutions, LLC.

Mark Miklos

Spirit Aerosystems

Tonya Sudduth

Bombardier

Dick Koenig

Commemorative Air Force

John S. Langford

Electra.aero

Sami Said

Northrop Grumman

Joseph Huber

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Int’l Airport

Mary Miller

Signature Aviation

Mary Claire Murphy

Textron Aviation

Mark Ofsthun

Honda Aircraft Company

Martin Palmaz

US Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association

Pat Prentiss

The Ninety-Nines, Inc.

Skip Ringo

The Ringo Group

Jay Davis

Rolls-Royce, North America

Darby Becker

The Aero Club of Washington

Ben Kowalski

Cirrus Aircraft

Bob Stangarone

Stangarone & Associates

Brad Thress

FlightSafety International

Read Van De Water

Safran USA

Anthony L. Velocci

Aviation Week & Space Technology Magazine (Retired)

Clyde Woltman

Leonardo Helicopters, USA

Martiqua Post

US Air Force Academy

Ted Ellett

Hogan Lovells

Amy Spowart

NAA President & CEO

Nicole Alexander

Wichita Aero Club

Che' Bolden

The Charles F. Bolden Group

Matt Byrd

Hillwood Aviation

Lauren Haertlein

Joby Aviation

Billy Nolen

Archer Aviation

Joan Higginbotham

Joan Higginbotham Ad Astra, LLC

James Viola

Helicopter Association International

Rebecca Lutte

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Bradley McKeage

Embraer

Yvette Rose

FAA

Stacey Rudser

Association for Women in Aviation Maintenance

Goodloe Sutton

The Boeing Company

Brad Thress

Flight Safety International

Patty Wagstaff

Patty Wagstaff Aviation Safety, LLC

Claudia Zapata-Cardone

United Airlines

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/28/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/28/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.