PLATINUM2024

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Responding to Local Disasters Nationally

aka Disaster Services Corporation   |   Irving, TX   |  www.svdpdisaster.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

EIN: 82-0658251


Mission

The mission of the Disaster Services Corporation is to model the charism of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul by providing quality programs and services to families and communities impacted by natural and manmade disasters across this great nation.

Notes from the nonprofit

Disaster Services Corporation (DSC) facilitates change by integrating equity into all aspects of emergency management. Our focus is on humanity and our vision supports the empowerment of marginalized communities within all phases of the disaster management cycle. We support the development and implementation of innovative community-based programs and adaptation projects to enhance resilience in diverse, vulnerable, and underserved communities.

Ruling year info

2017

CEO

Ms. Elizabeth Disco-Shearer

Main address

511 E John Carpenter Freeway Suite 500

Irving, TX 75062 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

SVDP Disaster Services

EIN

82-0658251

Subject area info

Disasters and emergency management

Population served info

Adults

Economically disadvantaged people

Emergency responders

NTEE code info

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Affiliations

See related organizations info

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Disasters are becoming increasingly more complex, more frequent, and more costly. As the disaster arm of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, we work with the National Council to serve the local Councils and Conferences, providing Vincentians throughout the United States with training, education, spiritual formation, and financial support as they assist millions of neighbors in need. (we don’t do Spiritual Formation) We also provide Disaster Case Management to communities that request our help across the United States. Since its founding in Paris in 1833, the Saint Vincent de Paul has grown to 800,000 members in over 150 countries with 1,500,000 volunteers combatting the effects of poverty, suffering, and loneliness present in millions in our communities. For that reason, we collaborate with all who seek to alleviate need and address its systemic causes. DSC’s and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s work is unique in that Vincentians offer tangible assistance to those in need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Disaster Case Management

The Society has led and coordinated Disaster Case Management programs in various forms for decades. One example is the work that Vincentians do on home visits providing person to person service. In more recent times, Disaster Services Corp, SVDP-USA has standardized its forms and training for Disaster Case Management to meet National VOAD, state, and FEMA requirements. DSC has been successful in being awarded federal subcontracts and in producing the required outcomes. DCM programs are one of the most critical aspects of long-term disaster recovery, because they help families navigate the bureaucracy of federal and state recovery programs and access Voluntary Organizations’ funds. Additionally, DSC’s Disaster Case Managers assist our client families in developing their long-term recovery plan--a roadmap for where each family will be 9-24 months after the disaster. Disaster Case Managers also advocate for their clients, and appeal adverse decisions of federal, state, private insurers, and other recovery funding decision-makers.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Over the last few years, the Society has i) worked on Systemic Change Programs that examined the root causes of poverty, and ii) developed programs to eliminate the roadblocks that keep families trapped in poverty. Although Disaster Case Managers assist families in finding resources to rebuild their homes and restart life in their “new normal”, not as much emphasis has been put on economic recovery, especially in poverty-stricken rural areas. The key question here is: It’s great for families to have new homes to go back to, but how do they sustain themselves and their homes in an area with no jobs?

DSC first piloted the commissioning of a post-disaster economic recovery plan after the West, TX, fertilizer plant explosion disaster in 2013. DSC was able to get grant funding to bring in a team of architects and city planners to help the small town of West determine how to attract new businesses to improve its tax base, add jobs, and give the survivors long-term financial stability. A total of 45 new jobs were developed through this first initiative and now the town has a master plan to attract other companies. Using the West, TX, model, DSC held economic recovery summits in both West Virginia and Nebraska to assist rural communities devastated by floods. Economic Recovery Programs help to create systemic change for those we serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

The House in a Box Program® is one of the most well-known programs of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. The program helped the Disaster Services Corporation win the NVOAD NGO of the Year Award in 2012. House in a Box® provides new furniture and furnishings to families that have lost everything because of disasters. Families are reviewed and referred to the program through a Disaster Case Management process that ensures that there is no duplication of benefits. DSC buys furniture and furnishings in volume through pre-screened vendors, so that it can provide a starter household furniture kit at a greatly reduced price. All logistics for the House in a Box ® Program are handled by the Disaster Services Corporation.SVDP Councils and other agencies, inquiring about the House in a Box® Program can email James H. Butler at [email protected].

The goal of the program is to provide new household items for families who have lost everything as a result of natural disasters and who are forced into situational poverty. The “House in a Box®” gives dignity to families in crisis as it gives them a new start and fresh start. All families receive the same new items which are packaged for efficiency of delivery. The program is scalable to the size of the family and starts at $2,500 for a family of four.

One package includes: beds, linens, dishes, pots and pans, dressers, silverware, bathroom setup, dinette and a couch.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Disaster Services Corporation (DSC), SVDP-USA provides Disaster Management Consulting Services to states and VOADs that need help in setting up Disaster Case Management programs, and want DCM training at both the staff and management levels. This past year, DSC provided training to the State of Louisiana for Disaster Case Managers and Supervisors, and to the West Virginia VOAD for Disaster Case Managers and management staff. DSC also assisted NVOAD with Disaster Case Work, Disaster Case Management, Financial Internal Controls and Grant Writing Training for Long Term Recovery in SC.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders
Adults

Parish Recovery Centers (P-RACS) are located in key parish community centers after a disaster and provide a holistic approach to Disaster Recovery. The Centers do not replace the work of FEMA, the State or local VOADs, but rather compliment their services by being an outreach to survivors that may be socially, geographically and culturally isolated during the recovery process. The P-RACS provide immediate Case Work services, resources, and connect survivors to vital community services and provide Emotional and Spiritual Support according to NVOAD standards. DSC partners with Texas A&M Extension Services (TEEX) to provide “just in time” training for the P-RACS. Trained Vincentian volunteers that have lead P-RACS in other disasters are deployed to assist Councils in disaster zones. All the logistics and forms for the P-RACS are coordinated by DSC.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

We train and deploy Vincentian Volunteers at our Annual Disaster Conference on how to deploy in teams of four to assist SVDP Councils in disaster impacted areas. The Teams follow an Incident Command Model and provide support to our local Vincentians on how best to organize local relief and recovery efforts. Rapid Response Teams are generally deployed for a period of two weeks and are comprised of an Incident Commander, a Public Information Officer, a Resource Coordinator and a Logistics Officer.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

DSC supports Vincentian Councils and Isolated Conferences in the United States and American Territories. DSC provides logistical support and Rapid Response and Long Term Recovery Grants to our Councils that are impacted by manmade and natural disasters. The Society of St. Vincent de Paul is divided into 8 Regions and each Region is represented by a Regional Disaster Representative that sits on the National Disaster Committee. The Disaster Reps contact DSC when Councils are in need of grants or other programs to support their recovery efforts.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Member of the Year 2021

National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster

Affiliations & memberships

National VOAD Member of the Year 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of timely caseworker visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Disaster Case Management

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Disaster survivors cases closed through Disaster Services Corporation, SVDP-USA's Disaster Case Management Program (DCMP).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St. Vincent de Paul USA (DSC) is a Catholic lay organization and non-profit that provides person-to-person recovery services to families impacted by man-made and natural disasters across the United States and US territories.
DSC has three main goals:
1.) Model the charism of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul by providing quality programs and services to families and communities impacted by natural and manmade disasters across this great nation.
2.) Maintain as a self-sustaining corporation which guides and directs Vincentians to provide person to person emergency assistance and support services to victims of natural and manmade disasters
3.) Ensure equity and inclusion in every aspect of our business. Disasters do not discriminate, nor do we. We are diverse. We are inclusive. We help everyone possible under our program. We celebrate humanity in good times and bad. We are continuing to build a culture with multiple approaches and points of view. We believe diversity drives advancement. We are constantly growing our platform and developing our people. We welcome uniqueness and strive for the best possible outcomes for our clients.

What are your strategies for making this happen?
Briefly describe your organization’s strategies here. – 3,000 Characters

DSC understands that in order to fully meet the needs of disaster-impacted communities, strategic partnerships are critical. DSC works with a variety of organizations at the national, state, and local levels. Our CEO currently sits at the Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors for the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD) – a national association of over 150 non-profits who have disaster relief as their primary mission. Our COO sits on the board for West Virginia Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (WV VOAD) and serves as Chair of the Advocacy Committee for NVOAD. Our CPO sits on the board of the New Jersey Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NJ VOAD) and is an active member on several NVOAD committees such as the Disaster Case Management Committee. Our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) has the experience and expertise to oversee the financial reporting, accounting, and audits of multiple federal grants and programs concurrently. As such, DSC has emerged as a leader in the sector, both through the services DSC provides, but through the thought leadership of the forward leaning leadership team. In addition, we have developed several strategic partnerships. 1. Good360 (501c3) is the global leader in product philanthropy and purposeful giving, working with companies that have products to donate, and matching those goods with nonprofits like DSC that serve people in need across the country. DSC has partnered on their Disaster Recovery work, focusing on distributing products needed in all phases of disaster recovery – emergency prep, emergency response, clean up, rebuilding and re-living (moving back in). Product needs include shelter items, shoes, clothing, cleaning supplies, building supplies, furniture, and household goods. Working with Good360, we have averaged a 18x amplification of funds. This means that $10,000 in funding allows us to distribute at least $180,000 in donated products. 2. DSC is partnering with Airbnb to house disaster relief paid staff and volunteers. Airbnb’s Open Homes program enables the community to offer free, temporary housing for those who are displaced and for relief workers who have deployed as part of the disaster recovery process. Through a combination of donated travel credits and access to the Open Homes platform, DSC’s disaster volunteers will be able to stay close to communities impacted by disaster and perform critical disaster case management services. 3. DSC has also created a partnership with the America Logistics Aid Network (ALAN), a non-profit logistics organization that provides free transportation for DSC’s hygiene kits, winter clothing, non-perishable foods, and much more. 4. DSC has recently partnered with Airlink, another non-profit logistics organization that provides free airline tickets to DSC staff and volunteers, affording DSC to maintain

DSC has an extremely experienced core leadership team and diverse staff that can provide services to Americans of all backgrounds, ethnicities and faith. Our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is a nationally recognized leader in the disaster relief and recovery sector, drawing upon years of working with the federal government and holding various positions on national boards and committees. The core leadership team is comprised of emergency management subject matter experts and seasoned project managers. DSC has the ability to deploy at a moment’s notice to deploy Rapid Response Teams, provide Rapid Response and Long-Term Recovery Grants, stand up Parish Recovery Assistance Centers, oversee Disaster Case Management Programs, implement our nationally recognized House in a BoxTM program, coordinate Economic Recovery Summits and provide subject matter experts to consult to facilitate trainings. Rapid Response Teams: DSC trains Vincentian volunteers at our Annual Disaster Conference on how to deploy in teams of four to assist SVDP Councils in disaster impacted areas. The Teams follow an Incident Command Model and provide support to our local Vincentians on how best to organize local relief and recovery efforts. Grants: DSC provides Rapid Response Grants of up to $5,000 and Long-Term Recovery Grants up to $20,000 to local SVDP Councils and Conferences to support immediate and long-term needs. Parish Recovery Assistance Centers: Parish Recovery Centers (P-RACS) are located in key parish community centers after a disaster and provide a holistic approach to Disaster Recovery. The Centers do not replace the work of FEMA, the State or local VOADs, but rather compliment their services by being an outreach to survivors that may be socially, geographically and culturally isolated during the recovery process. Disaster Case Management Programs: Disaster Case Management programs are one of the most critical aspects of long-term disaster recovery, because they help families navigate the bureaucracy of federal and state recovery programs and access voluntary organizations’ funds. DSC’s Disaster Case Managers assist our client families in developing their long-term recovery plan--a roadmap for where each family will be 9-24 months after the disaster. Disaster Case Managers also advocate for their clients, and appeal adverse decisions of federal, state, private insurers, and other recovery funding decision-makers. House in a BoxTM: provides new furniture and furnishings to families that have lost everything because of disasters. Families are reviewed and referred to the program through a Disaster Case Management process that ensures that there is no duplication of benefits. Economic Recovery Summits: Over the last few years, the Society has worked on Systemic Change Programs that examined the root causes of poverty, and developed programs to eliminate the roadblocks that keep families trapped in poverty. Economic Recovery Programs help to create systemic change.

DSC has grown significantly in the past four years. Our Disaster Case Management Program has grown from serving just one state to serving up to 4 states at a time for Disaster Case Management, while also providing assistance for floods, hurricanes, wildfires and the pandemic. Give the total value of services provided.

Recently, DSC completed our work in the Hurricane Harvey Consortium Disaster Case Management Program called: Project Comeback Texas. Project Comeback Texas was a FEMA funded Disaster Case Management Pilot led by the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster (NVOAD). Five major NVOAD organizations participated in the leadership role of the program. Disaster Services Corp provided the financial oversight for the program and:
• Successfully served 4,215 cases in 17 Counties in Texas
• Worked with a new platform called DART for tracking client data
• Accessed numerous resources from NVOAD partners, other community organizations, and local Long Term Recovery groups
• Implemented virtual Disaster Case Management
• Provided training and guidance on the financial requirements of federal contracts and internal compliance on the financial deliverable
The DSC House in a BoxTM program has also grown significantly. During Hurricane Harvey, DSC partnered with the American Red Cross to serve of 700 families and 2,800 individuals with new mattresses, bedding, sofa couches, and kitchen and bathroom kits – a value of over 1.4 million dollars.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.00

Average of 1.08 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3

Average of 2.1 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 15% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $720,201 -$158,762 $172,735 $181,749 $9,136
As % of expenses 115.9% -0.7% 1.1% 4.3% 0.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $720,124 -$163,332 $168,475 $178,959 $6,346
As % of expenses 115.9% -0.7% 1.1% 4.3% 0.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,341,672 $20,400,124 $14,737,522 $4,397,385 $6,822,272
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 0.0% -27.8% -70.2% 55.1%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 91.0% 85.2% 41.5% 54.1%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 8.9% 14.4% 57.3% 44.7%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.1% 0.3% 1.2% 1.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $621,471 $23,625,026 $15,437,541 $4,186,633 $6,123,218
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 0.0% -34.7% -72.9% 46.3%
Personnel 31.2% 75.7% 77.2% 45.4% 69.3%
Professional fees 2.4% 5.4% 7.0% 6.1% 5.4%
Occupancy 1.0% 3.2% 3.1% 2.2% 1.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
Pass-through 48.5% 8.7% 8.1% 37.1% 20.1%
All other expenses 17.0% 7.0% 4.6% 9.1% 3.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $621,548 $23,629,596 $15,441,801 $4,189,423 $6,126,008
One month of savings $51,789 $1,968,752 $1,286,462 $348,886 $510,268
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $566,437 $244,605
Fixed asset additions $13,077 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $686,414 $25,598,348 $16,728,263 $5,104,746 $6,880,881

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.1 0.0 1.0 3.4 3.0
Months of cash and investments 5.1 0.0 1.0 3.4 3.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 13.7 -0.2 -0.1 0.1 0.1
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $263,008 $13,319 $1,307,745 $1,170,479 $1,533,282
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $680,332 $2,085,139 $675,469 $395,286 $956,018
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $13,000 $26,950 $13,950 $13,950 $13,950
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 26.3% 44.2% 64.2% 84.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 25.0% 64.6% 93.8% 79.7% 59.6%
Unrestricted net assets $0 -$297,468 -$128,993 $49,966 $56,312
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $1,166,180 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $1,166,180 $261,866 $290,869 $980,787
Total net assets $720,124 $868,712 $132,873 $340,835 $1,037,099

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

CEO

Ms. Elizabeth Disco-Shearer

Elizabeth has over 25 years of senior management experience and is a former College Administrator, Federal Compliance Contractor, Senior Partner of a Non- Profit Consulting Firm that assisted NGOs on regulatory compliance, and an Administrator for Catholic Charities of Dallas, Executive Director of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul of Dallas, Regional Director of South Central Region of SVDP and COO of the National Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul’s Disaster Division. She is a national speaker on Disaster Case Management and on Long Term Economic Recovery after a disaster.She has served on many NGO Boards including being President of the Texas Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, President of the Texas Association of Financial Aid Administrators, President of the Denton County League of Women Voters, President of NE Dallas Citizens Emergency Response Team, and others. Elizabeth is currently a Board Member for the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Disaster Services Corporation - Society of St Vincent De Paul USA

Board of directors
as of 01/30/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Brian Burgess

Barbara Slaven

SVDP Midwest Region

Brian Burgess

SVDP Shreveport, LA

Joseph Williams

SVDP New Jersey

Fr John McEvoy

Spiritual Advisor

Gautam Bazaz

Amarnath Partners

James Anderson

Wholecrowd LLC

William Mennonna

PNC Capital Advisors

Saif Rehman

NextGen Consulting

Christopher Disney

SVDP Arlington

Kenneth Freeman

Gartner Inc

John Barry

National Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, USA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/10/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data