PLATINUM2023

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Everyone Deserves Healthy Relationships

aka DSVS   |   Red Lodge, MT   |  www.dsvsmontana.org
GuideStar Charity Check

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

EIN: 20-2358889


Mission

Our mission is to empower those impacted by violence and foster healthy relationships. We provide services in Carbon and Stillwater Counties in southeast Montana and educators provide our violence prevention curriculum in schools across Montana and nationwide.

Ruling year info

2005

Co-Director

Jenn Battles

Co-Director

Libby Johnson

Main address

PO Box 314

Red Lodge, MT 59068 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-2358889

Subject area info

Sexual assault victim services

Domestic violence

Sexual abuse

Domestic violence shelters

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Victims of crime and abuse

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Spouse Abuse, Prevention of (I71)

Sexual Abuse, Prevention of (I73)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to empower those impacted by violence and foster healthy relationships. Our vision: We strive for the day when violence is no longer part of our lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Direct Client Services

DSVS provides direct client services, including a free and confidential 24-hour Helpline; emergency shelter; transitional housing; food and transportation; hospital, police and court accompaniment and support; assistance in applying for orders of protection and crime victim compensation; one-on-one crisis counseling; assistance with documenting stalking or abusive behavior; legal advocacy; and referrals to other social service agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Children and youth
Women and girls

DSVS teaches violence prevention education appropriate for grade school, middle school, high school, and adult audiences. In particular, Power Up, Speak Out! is a 5 lesson toolkit for educators that encourages middle school students to think critically about healthy relationships, power dynamics, boundaries, and consent. Created with a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and piloted in 2012, our lessons teach students what TO DO, instead of what NOT to do. Since 2012, we have trained thousands of teachers to facilitate our program and they have reached tens of thousands of youth nationwide. We also oversee a youth mentoring program and provide speakers to present on relevant domestic and sexual violence topics for service clubs, church groups, youth groups, civic organizations, bartenders, and community events.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents
Teachers
Students

DSVS partners with other agencies and entities providing care to those we serve, as a means to improve wrap-around services for survivors. We provide professional in-service training for law enforcement, members of the justice system, medical providers, educators, social workers, clergy, therapists, and the business community. We regularly engage with these partners to evaluate continuum of care, adjusting and improving as needed. These partnerships have led to innovation to overcome barriers for survivors to access resources.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Caregivers
Victims and oppressed people
Emergency responders

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Direct Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Direct Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We operate a 24 hour a day / 7 days a week confidential helpline for crisis calls - completely operated by trained volunteer advocates.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Direct Client Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people who received presentations on healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Violence Prevention Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are working hard to ensure that people understand the issues surrounding sexual and domestic violence. We strive to create an atmosphere of support and understanding for survivors of domestic and sexual violence. This involves teaching community members what healthy relationships look like to help foster a future free from violence.

DSVS, located in Red Lodge, began offering services to individuals experiencing violence in 1999 and has been in operation for over 20 years. DSVS works to prevent and alleviate violence using a three-pronged approach: 1. We provide guidance and resources to primary victims of domestic and sexual violence and their dependent children. These services include: 24-hour helpline support, emergency shelter, transitional housing, food, transportation, hospital and court accompaniment, assistance with applying for orders of protection and crime victim compensation, assistance with parenting plans, one-on-one crisis counseling, and emergency financial assistance. 2. We are members of the Carbon County and Stillwater County Coordinated Community Response (CCR) Teams, which works with law enforcement, legal professionals, social service providers, and medical professionals to provide holistic services to survivors and hold perpetrators accountable. 3. We provide healthy relationships education to youth in our service area, throughout Montana, and nationwide through our education program, Power Up, Speak Out!, parenting classes, and health enhancement lessons.

Our organization employs a community wide approach. Because we serve such rural populations we find it most effective if we partner with businesses and other providers to meet the needs of clients in our area. Our project partners include:1) Local attorneys to work with victims on a pro bono or reduced rate for parenting plans, divorce paperwork, etc. 2) Carbon and Stillwater Victim/Witness Assistance Programs 3) Abuse Support and Prevention Education Network (providing victim services and prevention education in Sweet Grass, Park and Meagher Counties) 4) Red Lodge and Columbus Emergency Medical Services (EMS) 5) City of Red Lodge, Columbus and Bridger Police Departments 6) Carbon County and Stillwater County Sheriff's Offices 7) Adult Protective Services (serving Carbon, Stillwater and Sweet Grass Counties) 8) Local hotel and restaurants 9) Montana schools across the state. All of these partners as well as our over 60 active volunteers and our local donors give us the capacity to work everyday to address and prevent violence in our communities.

DSVS, since 1999, has become a fully operational domestic violence center. We have grown from a single woman on a porch doing all she was able to help victims in the area to two offices with ten caring and qualified advocates. We have developed and implemented an education program that is being requested state wide and, with increasing frequency, by organizations even outside of our state. We have created a county-wide approach to addressing these issues--by strengthening our relationships with our system partners, police, the judiciary, churches, medical providers, mental health workers, and many others, we are able to access and help more people. We have created a system to get rural victims of sexual assault access to SANE exams. This innovative program has now been implemented successfully in two counties and is being considered by many more. Through hard work and consistent efforts, our organization has become a model for domestic violence centers in rural areas across the state. We recently partnered with Montana Legal Services Association to directly provide legal counsel to our clients. We promote our Power Up, Speak Out! toolkits to teachers nationwide and we operate a used furniture thrift store to create sustainable income for our organization.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.25

Average of 12.87 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.5

Average of 4.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2021 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

22%

Average of 24% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $10,853 $56,448 $20,998 $132,724 $15,836
As % of expenses 2.0% 8.5% 2.8% 21.7% 2.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $10,853 $56,448 $20,998 $125,302 $7,038
As % of expenses 2.0% 8.5% 2.8% 20.2% 1.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $569,376 $737,883 $765,964 $709,315 $670,041
Total revenue, % change over prior year 12.5% 29.6% 3.8% -7.4% -5.5%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.1% 0.2%
Government grants 74.3% 76.8% 77.2% 72.4% 76.6%
All other grants and contributions 22.8% 21.1% 19.3% 25.8% 22.1%
Other revenue 2.8% 1.9% 3.3% 1.8% 1.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $533,477 $660,534 $741,728 $612,429 $653,840
Total expenses, % change over prior year 7.1% 23.8% 12.3% -17.4% 6.8%
Personnel 64.4% 62.0% 61.2% 69.2% 65.2%
Professional fees 2.7% 1.2% 1.4% 1.7% 4.4%
Occupancy 7.5% 6.3% 6.1% 7.3% 9.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.3% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 25.2% 30.5% 31.2% 21.7% 21.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Total expenses (after depreciation) $533,477 $660,534 $741,728 $619,851 $662,638
One month of savings $44,456 $55,045 $61,811 $51,036 $54,487
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $38,732 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $577,933 $715,579 $803,539 $709,619 $717,125

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Months of cash 4.3 4.0 3.5 6.3 5.5
Months of cash and investments 4.9 4.0 3.5 6.3 5.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.9 5.0 4.8 7.6 7.3
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Cash $192,122 $217,563 $217,486 $322,835 $298,413
Investments $25,046 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $34,291 $83,641 $82,428 $78,060 $99,971
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $25,006 $25,006 $25,006 $68,994 $73,994
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 54.6% 62.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 7.7% 12.9% 7.7% 7.8% 5.5%
Unrestricted net assets $217,618 $274,066 $295,064 $420,366 $427,404
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $25,046 $20,901 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $25,046 $20,901 $24,139 $27,304 $31,762
Total net assets $242,664 $294,967 $319,203 $447,670 $459,166

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Director

Jenn Battles

Jenn Battles (she/her/hers) has over 20 years experience managing nonprofit organizations based in the US. She is a veteran of the US Navy and has degrees in Environmental Science and Environment & Community. In her career, she has worked to advance causes in support of veterans, those who are unhoused, farmers & ranchers, young people, and survivors of violence.

Co-Director

Libby Johnson

Libby Johnson obtained her bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education and Special Education from Montana State University -- Billings, her masters of science in Special Education/Applied Behavior Analysis from Montana State University – Billings, and her masters of science in Educational Leadership from Rocky Mountain College. Libby has experience working as a licensed special education teacher in Red Lodge Public Schools and a behavior consultant for the Montana Office of Public Instruction and the Yellowstone-West Carbon County Special Services Cooperative. She routinely presents at statewide conferences and provides professional development training through CSPD Region III, the Montana Office of Public Instruction, and Montana State University -- Billings. Libby has worked in in-home settings, public schools, and residential placements for children and adolescents who have social-emotional, cognitive, and behavioral needs.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SERVICES OF CARBON COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 06/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Randy Dragon

No Affiliation

Term: 2017 - 2024

JoAnne Coolidge

Retired

Kristi Summers

Retired

Ben Cherland

Pastor Messiah Lutheran Church

Maryvette Labrie

Bookkeeper

Arleen Boyd

Retired

Suzi Pendergraft

Retired

Eric Allen

American Red Cross

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/21/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/06/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.