PLATINUM2023

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

aka scgrrescue   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  www.scgrrescue.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

EIN: 30-0454968


Mission

Our mission is to rescue homeless Golden Retrievers, Golden mixes, and like breeds in Southern California from situations of abuse and neglect regardless of conditions or circumstances.

Notes from the nonprofit

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue is the third largest in the nation. We do this without benefit of a sanctuary but from an amazing group of volunteers that open their homes to foster these dogs. We do this with over 90% of every dollar collected going directly to the medical care of the dogs in our care. We cannot do this without the help of the public. Corporate sponsors, our monthly donor program, grants and trusts, individual sponsorship are just some ways to give to this worthy cause. To date, Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue has saved and re-homed over 5,000 dogs, many who would have never had this second chance.

Ruling year info

2007

President

Lynne Goldsmith

Vice President

Liz Miller

Main address

PO Box 25698

Los Angeles, CA 90025 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

30-0454968

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Animal rescue and rehabilitation

Population served info

Adults

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We are helping to save lives. We rescue dogs from situations of abuse and neglect; dogs that are forgotten or unwanted; dogs with severe medical issues where their owners can no longer afford care; dogs who would never survive in their countries of origin. We treat these animals and provide the best possible care during their time in foster homes, then find their perfect family.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Program

All dogs that come through our doors are fostered in a home, matched specifically with a family that will meet their needs. The foster family provides food, love, socialization, transport to the vet or events, and a safe and nurturing environment with the support of the rescue by means of a personal representative (case manager) for each dog. Designated by geographical location, each representative works with many foster families. Together, they take photos, build the biographies, and ultimately select the forever home. The length of stay depends on the needs of each dog. Sometimes we need long term foster families for surgical rehabilitation, or permanent fosters, for dogs that will remain with the rescue because of their special needs. SCGRR pays all expenses while the dog is in foster care. Do to the vast area SCGRR covers, fosters are also connected via social media for additional support.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our International Program was resurrected in 2016 when we welcomed a group of twenty dogs from Turkey. It has now expanded to include rescue partners in South Korea, China, and Mexico as well. Partnering with international rescue groups from each specific country, these dogs are saved from abuse, neglect, and worse case, the meat market trade. Our international team works diligently to make sure we were in compliance with the USDA and APHIS guidelines, obtaining permits and health certificates for all dogs that arrived from these countries. These dogs go through an intensive vet screening process once they arrive, then are placed into loving foster homes until adoption.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue is lucky to have twenty very special families that care for our precious Golden Retrievers who for health reasons are not adoptable. These volunteers love and care for these goldens without the worry of vet expenses. One hundred percent of the vet care is paid for by your generous donations and our continuous fundraising. They are truly heroes and vital to saving those that need ongoing care. All have special needs; we have seniors with severe arthritis, some with seizures, one pup with an eye disease causing blindness, a senior with laryngeal paralysis, a younger dog with a severe genetic heart defect, dogs with severe fear-based anxiety, many with cancer who are terminal. On an average we have 12 dogs in the program at all times. In 2018 we welcomed ten new dogs into the program and helped six cross the Rainbow Bridge.

Population(s) Served
Adults

There has been a significant increase in rescue dogs with problematic behaviors. Some are shelter dogs but most are relinquished by their owners for behavioral reasons. We get dogs that are dog aggressive, leash reactive, resource guard, and occasionally come with a human bite history. They deserve a chance with all the resources at our disposal. These dogs are evaluated before they come into rescue and in all cases, require special placement. Many times we can find a foster home that can provide the stability the dog needs and provide support of one of our valued training partners. In the event we do not have suitable placement, our dogs are boarded at facilities that can work with specific issues until we can find that foster home that meets their needs. We have established a behavior support team of volunteers who have experience in working with these dogs; additionally we seek support from training professionals as necessary, to ensure we are meeting the needs of these dogs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue has a dedicated team of event volunteers that represent rescue and adoption all over Southern California speaking to thousands of visitors, networking, establishing new partnerships, and recruiting new volunteers and foster families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Foster Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All dogs that come into rescue are placed in a foster home. Historically, 6 - 9 % of incoming dogs annually remain with SCGRR for the rest of their lives as a Permanent Foster, the rest are rehomed.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Foster Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The average stay for dogs in rescue is 6 weeks. Each dog has their own representative that screen potential families for placement, therefore our percentage of returned dogs is less than 1% annually.

Number of senior dogs (9+ years) rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Foster Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All of our rescue dogs ages 7y+ (when large breed dogs are considered seniors) are provided additional health screening prior to adoption. We are fortunate to have adopters that look beyond the years

Number of animals surrendered by their owner

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Foster Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Dogs are surrendered for a variety of reasons; excessive medical cost; behavioral reasons; no time for pet; allergies; puppy amnesia; change in family circumstances such as relocation or divorce, etc

Number of animals provided with long term care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Permanent Foster Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This reflects the number of permanent foster dogs cared for in each year, not necessarily the year they came into rescue. Each dog has specific medical needs that prevent them from being adopted.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to find loving homes for all dogs that come through our doors. While in our care or foster homes provide stability for each dog. Some dogs take longer than others to adjust, or just get healthy enough to move to their forever home. We provide an alternative to shelters for families looking to re-home their pets, and safe harbor to do so.

Our Behavior and Rehabilitation program is expanding geographically and we are engaging fosters and volunteers to work with these dogs, providing proper training and guidance for the more problematic dogs. We have seen a significant increase over the years in this area.

Our Education and Outreach program provides assistance in the way of resources for the public, as well as awareness of our mission and vision.

Through our Permanent Foster Program we provide a lifetime of love and care for dogs that have medical issues beyond typical care, usually life-threatening diseases or very old age.

Team work. We have a large volunteer force who give their time, resources, and skill, abilities to their own area of interest. A strong fundraising team helps keep us afloat financially, we have a vast network of training resources, our foster network includes an additional 100+ volunteers just for this purpose, all with a passion for saving dogs.

Through monthly board meetings we address our financial health, all current events and concerns that affect our ability to operate, and manage our volunteer base effectively. Each member of the board wears other hats and is is supportive the rescue in other ways...boots on the ground so to speak.

Through targeted fundraising efforts we are budgeting specifically for our international dogs.

We have a solid events team that promotes our mission, as well as a strong social media presence. Networking with other rescues, we have established long term relationships that expand our resources.

Through organization, planning, communication, initiative, perseverance, education, leadership, selflessness, and mostly the love for dogs, every aspect of our rescue, from operations and administration, to picking up a dog from the shelter is a product of team work by a group of dedicated volunteers wanting to give these dogs a better life.

We provide educational and leadership opportunities for any volunteer wishing to do more and a mentor program for the newer volunteers so they feel a part of the team.

With a pulse on our financial health at all times, we are aware of any limitations that may arise and plan accordingly.

Since 2008, SCGRR has rescued and re-homed 300-400 annually. 2018 was the year we re-established our international program. The volunteers that took lead have worked directly with the FDA to ensure SCGRR is working within APHIS guidelines to get these dogs to the United States, bringing in 60 dogs from other countries. Despite the CDC ban on importing dogs, we have been able to continue our mission of rescuing dogs from South Korea in 2020. We are currently on hold with China.

Aside form every day rescue operations, we are currently focusing on our Behavior and Rehabilitation program. There has been a significant increase in the number of dogs with aggression issues. Enlisting trainers from all counties in our geographic area, SCGRR is providing support, training, and resources for fosters and volunteers that handle and transport these dogs. Through a lot of hard work and a diligent screening process, we have been able to find permanent homes for these dogs.

We have increased our public awareness through representation at large events (such as Goldie Palooza and Surf Dog) as well as smaller localized events. Increasing our events lead team, we will continue to expand public awareness to other communities in the Southern California area. This increase in awareness has brought new volunteers and foster families. Surpassing any year thus far, in 2019 we had 21 bonded pairs of dogs (not always 2 goldens) and four litter of puppies. Foster requirements for these needs are different.

Our social media outlets continue to attract more followers and in 2018 we expanded our fundraising efforts through Facebook. This brings a new source of financial support through for smaller dog campaigns and reaching people who just want to give via direct donations. 2019-2021: Facebook continues to blow up with fundraising for dogs in need. Our social media has been a way for people to stay connected and give generously throughout the pandemic.

TikTok came on board in 2021 with roughly 5,000 followers adding to much welcomed visibility for our mission.

Through the pandemic 2019-2021 we were able to keep our doors open for operation while complying with the ever flexible mandates from the CDC. Virtual home checks and in-person adoptions continued as we were able to save a record 953 dogs, facilitating 876 adoptions. Creative fundraising ideas were implemented to keep our doors open and support our mission. We stayed connected with our supporters and volunteers through social media and newsletters while keeping everyone apprised of our operations as the COVID mandates changed our ability to do business.

In 2021 we launched our new website, streamlining user experience while integrating our database information and social media. We adopted a new donor management program from Bloomerang.

In 2022 we have added a much needed board seat as a Medical director to alleviate this load that has been dispersed among other board members.

2023 brings change in leadership

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

52.80

Average of 32.63 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.4

Average of 4.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $72,519 -$6,480 $7,615 $0 $34,602
As % of expenses 15.6% -1.1% 1.5% 0.0% 3.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $72,519 -$6,480 $7,615 $0 $34,602
As % of expenses 15.6% -1.1% 1.5% 0.0% 3.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $538,187 $563,833 $545,667 $0 $1,027,391
Total revenue, % change over prior year -6.1% 4.8% -3.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Program services revenue 41.7% 45.2% 40.4% 0.0% 47.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.9% 2.7% 2.9% 0.0% 1.5%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 55.5% 48.1% 55.2% 0.0% 49.6%
Other revenue 1.9% 4.0% 1.5% 0.0% 1.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $465,668 $570,313 $522,815 $0 $992,789
Total expenses, % change over prior year 15.3% 22.5% -8.3% -100.0% 0.0%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Professional fees 0.4% 0.8% 1.2% 0.0% 0.7%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 99.6% 99.2% 98.8% 0.0% 99.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $465,668 $570,313 $522,815 $0 $992,789
One month of savings $38,806 $47,526 $43,568 $0 $82,732
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $504,474 $617,839 $566,383 $0 $1,075,521

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 7.5 3.2 5.3 0.0 3.4
Months of cash and investments 11.8 9.5 10.9 0.0 6.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 11.8 9.5 10.5 0.0 6.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $291,762 $152,071 $229,497 $0 $281,081
Investments $165,559 $300,641 $243,953 $0 $288,587
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.4% 3.2% 0.0% 1.9%
Unrestricted net assets $457,321 $450,841 $458,456 $0 $564,565
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $457,321 $450,841 $458,456 $0 $564,565

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Lynne Goldsmith

Vice President

Liz Miller

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Southern California Golden Retriever Rescue

Board of directors
as of 06/24/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Lynne Goldsmith

Cheryl Biernacki

SCGRRescue

Kris DeLuna

SCGRRescue

Liz Miller

SCGRRescue

Maureen Rodrigues

SCGRRescue

Tony Mathis

SCGRRescue

Christine Abney

SCGRRescue

Shirin Dayhoff

SCGRRescue

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes