PLATINUM2023

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

aka Casa de Esperanza   |   Houston, TX   |  www.casahope.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

EIN: 76-0105306


Mission

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos strives to break the cycle of child abuse and neglect for at-risk infants, children and their families, by providing comprehensive residential and family support programs that transform people and communities.

Ruling year info

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Melissa Simon

Chief Operating Officer

Mrs. Angiela Zielinski

Main address

PO Box 301209

Houston, TX 77230 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0105306

Subject area info

Family services

Youth services

Shelter and residential care

Foster care

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

Foster and adoptive parents

Foster and adoptive children

Ethnic and racial groups

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Foster Care (P32)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Foster Care Program

The Foster Care Program provides children safety, nurturing, and resources to reach appropriate developmental milestones and heal the effects of trauma and neglect. Children receive direct care in trauma-informed, loving homes where we address their basic needs including healthcare, assess their developmental deficits, and follow individual plans of service.

Casa de Esperanza provides foster care in either the Casa Neighborhood or in voluntary community foster homes. In both instances, foster parents are licensed, and all caregivers undergo extensive training before caring for a child. The Foster Care Program offers safety and care for children, primarily ages newborn to six years old who are at risk for abuse and neglect. Casa is one of the few child-placing agencies that accepts voluntary placements. Our primary goal is for children to thrive in a safe foster home, free from abuse and neglect, where their basic, health, emotional, and developmental needs are met.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children
At-risk youth

The Hands of Hope AmeriCorps Program provides a one-year service program
for recent college graduates or others interested in giving a year of service. After extensive pre-service training, these skilled and dedicated individuals live and work in our children’s homes and function as
parents and role models, providing quality care for the at-risk young children we serve. Working in this program for one year benefits each individual and transforms their outlook on life. Their experiences at Casa de Esperanza have changed the direction of many of their lives. All now approach their careers with
new insights regarding the needs of at-risk children and their families.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Making a lifesaving difference for a child means making a difference for the parents, the family, and the community. Casa de Esperanza’s Family Support Services creates a continuum of care and support for birth parents while children are in placement and after families are reunified. Our goal is that caregivers have the tools they need to provide a safe, stable, and nurturing home for their children.

While children are in our Foster Care program, we provide case management services for birth parents based on a customized plan developed at admission. Reunited families receive services through the Aftercare Program. While we aim to provide case management and support services to families for at least six months after discharge, our timeline is open-ended so that we can help families maintain safety and stability for the long-term.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Ethnic and racial groups
Parents
At-risk youth

The Post-Permanency Program works to ensure children have a safe, loving forever home if they cannot reunify with the birth family, and provides support and services to families who have opened their homes and hearts to heal the lives of children who were not protected from early childhood trauma. Our goal is that these families have the skills, support, and resources to navigate the complex needs of their children.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents
Children and youth
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new intakes into Residential Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

42 total children resided in the Residential Program. Changes in the child welfare landscape and COVID-related impacts directly affect our capacity to care for children in need.

Number of days of care provided through the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Changes in the child welfare landscape and COVID-related impacts have resulted in decreased neighborhood capacity and voluntary placements.

Number of pediatric medical visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes pediatric specialties, urgent care and emergency room visits.

Number of birth parents who enrolled in classes, treatment or counseling.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Parents

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Metric revised in 2018 to track number of parents who actually initiated treatment vs referred.

Number of children discharged to biological family members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This represents 85% of children discharged in 2022.

Number of children discharged to Children's Protective Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of families receiving Aftercare (Family Support) services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Parents

Related Program

Family Support Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An increased number of families requested help in 2020-21 due to job losses related to COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of families receiving Post-Permenancy services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Post-Permanency Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020-21 volunteer program limited by COVID restrictions.

Number of children discharged to adoption/other permanency status

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Foster Care Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos was founded in 1982 after the death of a toddler due to abuse by his mother’s new boyfriend. The mother expressed a wish that there had been a place she could have taken her son to keep him safe. For forty years Casa de Esperanza has provided safety for more than 6,500 abused, neglected and at-risk infants and young children in the greater Houston area. Casa de Esperanza focuses on children in the most vulnerable age group, newborn to six years old, who are most at-risk for abuse and neglect and cannot speak for themselves. Casa de Esperanza utilizes available community services for its clients, only developing new programs when needed services could not be found. From the first house in Houston’s Third Ward, Casa de Esperanza has grown into a trauma-informed, holistic program with a gated neighborhood of 10 homes near the Texas Medical Center and numerous community foster families, providing a comprehensive continuum of care for children and families in need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, Parents sometimes respond with what they think we want to hear

Financials

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.93

Average of 8.59 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.3

Average of 5.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26%

Average of 28% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $287,535 -$16,254 $506,851 -$87,025 -$572,905
As % of expenses 8.1% -0.4% 13.6% -1.9% -14.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $91,754 -$200,340 $330,394 -$253,840 -$741,486
As % of expenses 2.5% -5.3% 8.5% -5.5% -17.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,781,426 $3,635,338 $4,392,930 $4,287,383 $3,590,096
Total revenue, % change over prior year 1.8% -3.9% 20.8% -2.4% -16.3%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.6%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 10.2% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.7% 99.6% 89.6% 86.3% 100.1%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 13.6% -0.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,528,726 $3,631,766 $3,724,070 $4,467,833 $3,986,610
Total expenses, % change over prior year -3.9% 2.9% 2.5% 20.0% -10.8%
Personnel 72.4% 71.6% 68.9% 60.0% 69.9%
Professional fees 2.3% 3.5% 1.7% 2.6% 4.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 15.6% 0.0%
All other expenses 25.4% 25.0% 29.5% 21.8% 26.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,724,507 $3,815,852 $3,900,527 $4,634,648 $4,155,191
One month of savings $294,061 $302,647 $310,339 $372,319 $332,218
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $387,784
Total full costs (estimated) $4,018,568 $4,118,499 $4,210,866 $5,006,967 $4,875,193

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 6.4 6.4 7.5 6.1 3.3
Months of cash and investments 7.0 7.1 8.2 6.7 4.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.3 7.7 8.9 7.5 5.5
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,872,385 $1,936,451 $2,333,919 $2,276,790 $1,111,381
Investments $197,674 $200,893 $208,487 $211,595 $428,288
Receivables $482,928 $354,757 $495,902 $521,838 $281,493
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $6,142,257 $6,106,092 $6,107,673 $5,551,015 $5,832,484
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 50.5% 51.7% 53.8% 54.1% 52.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.3% 2.9% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3%
Unrestricted net assets $5,469,965 $5,269,625 $5,600,019 $5,346,179 $4,604,693
Temporarily restricted net assets $33,165 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $33,165 $52,991 $215,000 $121,575 $297,966
Total net assets $5,503,130 $5,322,616 $5,815,019 $5,467,754 $4,902,659

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Melissa Simon

Melissa Simon, MSW, CFRE, has 30 years over of progressively responsible experience in the social service sector, including direct service, resource development/fundraising, finance, operations, volunteer management, and leadership. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Houston and a Bachelor of Science degree from Sam Houston State University. Before receiving her MSW and transitioning into nonprofit management and development, Ms. Simon was a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, working with at-risk youth in alternative schools, probation departments, and locked facilities. Since that time, she has focused on fundraising, capacity building, and leadership development for nonprofit organizations and development professionals, always in the social service sector. . She is the past president of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Houston Chapter and served on several committees over the past 10 years.

Chief Operating Officer

Angiela Zielinski

Angiela Zielinski joined Casa de Esperanza as Chief Operating Officer in March 2022 and brings with her over 30 years of executive and program leadership experience in social services. While Ms. Zielinski has worked in nonprofit administration in Houston for over ten years, she previously worked in her hometown of Chicago, IL, where she held leadership positions in agencies serving at-risk children and families. Mrs. Zielinski holds two degrees: Bachelor of Social Work from Aurora University and a Master of Social Work from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is a licensed social worker, holds a Certificate in Nonprofit Management from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Great Cities Institute, and is a Certified Social Work Manager.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Meg Gentle

HIF

Term: 2024 - 2025


Board co-chair

Gentle

Ben Brown

Baker Katz

Kathleen Foster

Founder, Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Meg Gentle

HIF Global

Thomas W. McGee

Global Oilfield Investments, LLC

Bart Barrett

Wood Partners

Colleen McLaughlin

Community Volunteer

Michael Morris

Attorney

Kathleen Motil, M.D., Ph.D.

Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, USDA

Katherine O'Neil

Community Volunteer

Brad Dinerstein

The Dinerstein Companies

Shannon Hayes, M.D.

Texas Children’s Pediatrics

Kelley Morris

Non-Voting, Junior League Representative; Write Close & Barger, LLP

Mary Ellen Prochazka

Community Volunteer

Rebecca Baker

Vinson & Elkins

Karen Dixon

Truist Bank

Melissa Simon

Non-voting; CEO, Casa de Esperanza de los Ninos, Inc.

Jonathon Martinez

Total American Services

Scott Michelman

Shook, Hardy & Bacon, LLP

Katie Register

NRG Energy

Matt Reichenthal

Texas Iron & Metal

Jose Delgado

ConocoPhillips

Michael Johnson

Frost Private Banking

Megan Ryan

Community Volunteer

Alison Young

J.P. Morgan Wealth Management

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/9/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/09/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.