PLATINUM2023

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity Subordinate

Ending Homelessness and Substandard Housing

aka Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter   |   Marysville, CA   |  http://www.yubasutterhabitat.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

EIN: 68-0301692  Subordinate info


Mission

Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit dedicated to eliminating substandard housing and homelessness worldwide and to making adequate, affordable shelter a matter of conscience and action. Habitat invites people from all faiths and walks of life to work together in partnership, building houses with families in need.

Ruling year info

1987

CEO

Joseph Hale

Main address

202 D Street

Marysville, CA 95901 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

68-0301692

Subject area info

Housing development

Christianity

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Christian (X20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Upon researching data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics and in the 2013-2021 Yuba City and Marysville Housing Elements, our area exceeds the national average when it comes to Poverty, Unemployment and Homelessness. We have nearly 200 families each year that apply for homes through our program and sadly we are only able to ever serve but a few; and out of these families, nearly half will qualify immediately for this program. Below is a charge that includes: unemployment, poverty rate, and households making 50% or less of the area median income.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Affordable Housing Program

Habitat for Humanity was founded on a principle; to provide affordable housing to every low income family living in substandard conditions or without a home to call their own. In essence, Habitat for Humanity’s goal is to eliminate homelessness throughout the world. In order to accomplish this feat, and be great stewards of our mission, Habitat for Humanity utilizes a committee to find those families who are in need of a hand-up to make better lives for themselves and have the stability to be productive members of their community. This handbook outlines the policies and procedures used by Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter to find the family’s best suited to partner with this program.

Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter follows the three criteria set by Habitat for Humanity International, and complies with the Federal Housing and Urban Development Agency (HUD) and the State of California’s Department of Housing and Community Developments (HCD). These requirements are: Need for Housing, Ability to Pay, Willingness to Partner, and the guidelines set when considering low income, qualifying families.

Need for Housing: Applicants must currently be living in inadequate housing. This could include living in a structure that is unsafe, unsanitary (other than self-imposed), overcrowded, inaccessible or unaffordable. This could also include living in an unsafe neighborhood. Applicant must also be a resident in our service area of Yuba or Sutter Counties.

Ability to Pay: There is a minimum income level, meaning that the family must have a steady income to pay bills and the house payment which is due each month. Typically the amount of income that goes into the house payment should be no more than 30% of the household income.
i. Total family income (income earned by everyone living in the home 18 years of age or older) should not be more than the current low income guidelines published by the Housing and Urban Development Agency/HUD. Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter abides by the Yuba and Sutter County Poverty Census which is used by HUD in our local community. This is considered to be around 30% of the median income of Yuba and Sutter County Residents.
ii. With permission from the applicant family we will verify employment and income, including checking and savings account balances, statements from current and previous landlords, and request a credit report.

Willingness to Partner: Applicants must fully participate in the application process, attend any home ownership preparation classes, work with the sponsoring organization, participate in publicity, complete at least 500 hours of required Sweat Equity (education and service), and exhibit a willingness and ability to partner.
i. 250 sweat equity hours must be completed by the partner family (family members who will be living in the home). The additional 250 hours required may be provided by friends, relatives, and community members recruited by the partner family.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

A home repair program designed to help low income families, owning their own home with much needed repairs. This is an exterior program that can go from homes in need of critical repair to providing weatherization or energy efficiency.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Thrivent Builds Repairs 2014

Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Foundation

LEED Gold Certified Home 2015

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council

YouthBuild Workforce Award 2015

Bank of America Charitable Foundation

Partnership Award 2015

Americorps VISTA

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 1994

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of applications for housing received from targeted population

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Affordable Housing Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our primary mission is to end homelessness and substandard housing by providing low income home ownership opportunities to families in need.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Affordable Housing Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter owns and operates the Life Building Center, subcontracting services to Hands of Hope to run a coordinated entry program that provides casework and sheltering.

Number of people no longer living in unaffordable, overcrowded housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Affordable Housing Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Affordable Housing Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Affordable Housing Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The overall goal of the next five years is to strengthen partnerships with the Cities and Counties within our service area and secure local, state and federal housing and revitalization funding, to extend the number of home builds we can provide each year.

Anticipated Result: With allocated properties by the Cities and Counties through the procurement of land and reduction or removal of fees associated with building, in addition to the requisition of CAL Home Loans and Federal Home Loan Bank funding AHP (Affordable Home Program) Loans we anticipate the building of four (4) homes per year in Yuba City and one to two (1-2) Homes per year in Marysville, with the potential to reach further into the counties to include the more rural townships.

Increasing your donor base within the community is not just about asking for money or items, it's about creating a partnership, one that can have mutually beneficial results. Every year we will host a dinner in honor of our donors and display partner banners in our facility and at our worksites. It is not just Habitat building the home but everyone who donates to this program.

Anticipated Result: Increase partners, thus generating more revenue to build homes for low income families in the Yuba-Sutter area.

One of the best ways to increase the production or service of any program is through grant writing. There is a lot of money out there, available for small communities that don't have vast resources or persons available to support large charities. Throughout the next few years we will be building plans and templates to secure a stable and structured grant writing program to continue to attain outside revenues to promote construction and training.

Anticipated Result: Increased funding for new home building, home repairs, neighborhood revitalization and training for program participants in YouthBuild.

Turning our YouthBuild students into a diversified group of individuals into skilled laborers in construction takes a lot of effort, patience and discipline, but is necessary for the symbiotic relationship of building the lives of these young individuals as they build homes for families in need. Over the next few years we will push the envelope as we push to increase attendance and provide more program options in construction.

Anticipated Result: Expected student growth to go from 30 to 60 students per semester, doubling our attendance, which should increase are construction time per home and provide necessary skills to create contributing members to society.

In looking to the future of home building we must also look to the impact on both environment and the economy. That is why we will build LEED Homes to provide durable and sustainable housing.

The great benefits to the family are reduced energy costs, water costs and an easily maintainable yard. Not to mention a beautiful home that will stand the tests of time and allow for stability in the lives of members in our community.

We believe the impact stories we will be able to provide will show people the true success of our program. When people see the number of graduates in our YouthBuild program who were on path to go to prison or live a life on the street filled with drugs and the mental illness that soon follows, our program will speak for itself. When people read about the families we served, who were once at-risk of homelessness or living in substandard housing, and now have stability and a place to call home, something that will not benefit them once but for the rest of their lives, the program will reveal itself. And with these, great impacts in our community, we will be able to apply for grants and create even greater partnerships with individuals, local companies, and corporations that will help us to expand our program and serve many more in the Yuba-Sutter area.

With a volunteer force of 40 YouthBuild Students and nearly two dozen daily volunteers, we have the opportunity to take on a great volume of projects in our community. We recently received the benefit of have a 67,000sq.ft. (former Mervyn's building) sold to us for $1.9 million dollars (nearly 1/3 of its appraised value) giving us a great asset to operate from. Within the facility we have a Construction Zone where we can keep tools and construction supplies, a 16,000sq.ft. education facility, a 32,000sq.ft. ReStore that we sell discounted home improvement items from to raise funds for homebuilding, and a large area of administrative offices that allow us to run our whole operation under one roof.

I will not soon forget 2014, as it is the year our local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity blossomed. We saw a transition in the number of families we serve, go from one family every three years, to serving three families per year. To have a family go from their first family services orientation to knowing the long lasting stability that comes with being a homeowner in just a short, handful of months, is a true achievement for this organization.

Building new homes is only where it has begun for us though. For 2014 has also brought us a structured neighborhood revitalization program. A program that now allows us to not only build new homes, but to remodel existing homes for families struggling to keep up with mortgage payments,
including those who've worked all their lives and now are older, retired and not living off the wages that once made them a part of the middle class. This year we have repaired, weatherized, landscaped,
and provided energy efficiency (including solar) to seven additional families through our neighborhood revitalization efforts.

We have also provide solar to two preexisting Habitat for Humanity homes that we built in the late 1990's. As all labor and parts were donated free of charge, this service was able to be provided to our previous partner families at no additional cost, and yet they will reap the benefits for the next many years to come.

Fiscal Year 2014 was also the year we partnered with John Muir Charter School to operate a YouthBuild program. A program that had been a successful branch of Yuba County until loss of funding ended the counties opportunity to continue this much needed program. In taking over this program we were able to expand it to now encompass Sutter County and double its service area.

Additional changes were the vast growth in our ReStore facility, by far the greatest fundraiser for our home build program. Operation growth has allowed the ReStore to more than triple its sales since 2012, now nearing half a million in total sales each year.

The purpose of all of these things is to improve our community and make a positive impact on the lives of people in need. Through the educational services and training we provide, to the whole purpose to which we were formed; to build homes, and end homelessness and substandard housing, in our community, and throughout the world

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.30

Average of 3.02 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.5

Average of 2.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

934%

Average of 130% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $252,634 $226,281 $1,242,395 $7,911,811 -$3,187,849
As % of expenses 23.9% 19.9% 99.3% 291.5% -102.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $186,880 $153,155 $1,164,994 $7,706,498 -$3,638,874
As % of expenses 16.7% 12.7% 87.7% 264.0% -102.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,308,371 $1,314,939 $2,623,214 $10,611,526 $4,335,979
Total revenue, % change over prior year -15.0% 0.5% 99.5% 304.5% -59.1%
Program services revenue 19.4% 11.1% 25.3% 11.4% 53.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 1.7% 1.6% 1.6% 85.5% 33.8%
All other grants and contributions 42.9% 53.3% 47.0% 3.1% 12.9%
Other revenue 36.0% 34.0% 26.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,055,737 $1,134,934 $1,250,630 $2,714,033 $3,100,077
Total expenses, % change over prior year -9.7% 7.5% 10.2% 117.0% 14.2%
Personnel 47.6% 43.2% 38.4% 29.1% 35.0%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.5% 2.0% 1.9% 6.6%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 9.0% 14.4%
Interest 8.6% 8.3% 6.5% 2.9% 3.5%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 43.8% 48.0% 53.2% 57.1% 40.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,121,491 $1,208,060 $1,328,031 $2,919,346 $3,551,102
One month of savings $87,978 $94,578 $104,219 $226,169 $258,340
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $284,540 $0
Fixed asset additions $407,983 $0 $858,959 $8,056,245 $7,981,671
Total full costs (estimated) $1,617,452 $1,302,638 $2,291,209 $11,486,300 $11,791,113

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.0 0.7 0.9 0.4 13.5
Months of cash and investments 0.0 0.7 0.9 0.4 13.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -10.1 -6.6 -18.0 -1.5 -17.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash -$250 $69,796 $91,847 $83,583 $3,483,261
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $23,999 $514,857 $625,352 $1,057,804 $3,215,379
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,918,679 $2,883,940 $5,376,658 $13,396,842 $21,366,513
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 6.9% 9.5% 6.6% 3.9% 4.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 65.3% 63.2% 45.2% 22.6% 48.1%
Unrestricted net assets $1,828,216 $1,981,371 $3,146,365 $10,852,863 $7,213,989
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $6,853,037
Total net assets $1,828,216 $1,981,371 $3,146,365 $10,852,863 $14,067,026

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Joseph Hale

Joseph Hale started volunteering with Habitat for Humanity at the age of sixteen. He continued to volunteer with the organization while he attended college. He received two degrees in Art and History. After leaving college, he went on to working in administration. In 2011, he began working for Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter when he was hired for a job as the Director of Business Development. Within two years he took on the role of Chief Executive Officer (CEO). From 2013-2021 as CEO of Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter. I the last eight years Habitat for Humanity Yuba/Sutter has raised more than $40,000,000 through Grants, Gifts In Kind, Property and cash donations. These projects include a 36 unit hosuing development, two 62-Unit Permanent Housing Facilities and partnerships for a coordinated entry site and shelter, as well as, a large home repair program. Joseph Hale is a writer and has written three children's books. The first published in January of 2014.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Yuba/Sutter, Habitat for Humanity

Board of directors
as of 12/09/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Chong Yang

BlueShield of California

Term: 2016 -


Board co-chair

Paul Sweeney

Vice Chair

Term: 2018 -

Rosemary Daoust

Rabobank Marysville

Chong Yang

College Professor

Paul Sweeney

Retired Tug Boat Captain

Laurie Sweeney

Retired Educator

Steve Whitmore

Banker

Dan Turner

College Professor

John Baadsgaard

Waste Management

Victor Krambo

Retired Contractor

Rose Avila

Banker

Gwen Ford

Ministry

Ron Eberhardt

Military

Joseph Hale

President & CEO

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.