PLATINUM2024

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Joy. Power. Possibility.

aka LESGC   |   New York, NY   |  www.girlsclub.org
GuideStar Charity Check

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

EIN: 13-3942063


Mission

The Lower Eastside Girls Club (LESGC) is building a just and equitable future filled with “Joy. Power. Possibility.” We support young women and gender-expansive youth of color throughout New York City in leveraging their inner power to shape a better future for themselves, their community, and the world. By offering free, year-round, innovative programming in STEM, Arts, Digital Media, Music, Wellness, Performing Arts, Sustainability Studies, and Leadership, we connect young people with their passions, celebrate their curiosity, and channel their creative energy. We recently expanded our mission and service population with the launch of our Center for Wellbeing and Happiness (CWBH) offering wrap-around wellness and healing-centered services to all genders and all generations.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Jenny Dembrow

Main address

402 East 8th Street

New York, NY 10009 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-3942063

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Education

Environmental education

Mental health care

Public health

Show more subject areas

Population served info

LGBTQ people

Women and girls

Men and boys

Families

Parents

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Girls Clubs (O22)

Urban, Community (S31)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Lower Eastside Girls Club connects young women and gender-expansive youth of color throughout New York City to healthy and successful futures through free, innovative year-round programming and mentoring in STEM, Visual Arts, Digital Media, Performing Arts, Wellness, Civic Leadership. We connect young people with their passions, celebrate their curiosity, and channel their creative energy. Together, we are building a just and equitable future filled with “Joy. Power. Possibility.” In a world where the health concerns of BIPOC people are ignored, and where medical care is a luxury, self-care is also necessary to survival. That’s why our new Center for Wellbeing &Happiness provides free programs focused on physical, spiritual, emotional, social, economic, environmental, and educational wellness. Our vision is a Lower East Side community where our full humanity is valued and the wellbeing of all generations—from babies to elders—and genders is collectively supported.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lower Eastside Girls Club

Every year, hundreds of youth ages 10–23 visit our Center for Community facility, where we offer FREE after-school, weekend, and summer programming in STEM, Arts, Digital Media, Sound, Wellness, Performing Arts, Sustainability Studies, Farming, Culinary Studies, and Leadership. Our 35,000 sq. ft facility includes a Maker Shop; STEM lab for Environmental Studies; Alphabet City Art School for Multimedia Arts; Center for Digital Media, Film and Photography; Sound Studio for music production and podcasting; Design Studio for Fashion Arts; Rooftop Farm; Culinary Education Center; and 64-seat dome planetarium.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People of Latin American descent
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
At-risk youth

Our Center for Wellbeing and Happiness, which opened its doors in 2022, offers wrap-around wellness services to all genders and generations, with free classes in movement, nutrition, English language, financial wellbeing, workforce training, counseling, parenting advocacy, and support groups. CWBH is rooted in healing justice and a core belief that the wellbeing of Girls Club members is intimately connected to the wellbeing of her family, her community, and her world. Through CWBH we aim to create a dynamic wellness hub that transforms self-care into community care, while uplifting the expertise and experience of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) based in the Lower East Side community.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Families
People of Latin American descent
People of African descent
Multiracial people
At-risk youth
Families
People of Latin American descent
People of African descent
Multiracial people
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Pregnant people
Parents
Families
Caregivers
People of Asian descent
Multiracial people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lower Eastside Girls Club

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lower Eastside Girls Club

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Wellbeing and Happiness

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Center for Wellbeing and Happiness opened its doors in 2022. Programming was virtual in 2021 while under construction.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Wellbeing and Happiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2022 was the first year of the Center for Wellbeing and Happiness

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lower Eastside Girls Club

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Girls Club Newsletter

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of families reached through our direct programming and food pantry.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

LESGC supports our members along the journey toward a life of Joy, Power and Possibility. We integrate research-based positive youth development practices that demonstrate social-emotional learning outcomes that correlate with long-term gains and increased life-long thriving. For CWBH are focus is addressing the social determinants of health. We use Hello Insight, an online learning and evaluation platform, to deploy validated tools and analytics. Beyond Hello Insight we are continuously developing a rigorous and innovative Monitoring and Evaluation system that is quantitative and qualitative, program-based and longitudinal, professional and participatory. The guiding goals of our programmatic model are Empowerment, Passion and Joy, Meaningful Access to Resources, Social Connectedness, and Health and Wellbeing.

Empowerment
Members strengthen social-emotional capacities, demonstrating confidence, purpose, perseverance, and a solid sense of self. They can navigate the world and take action to change it.

Passion and Joy
Members thrive as they explore interests, discover and pursue their creative passions, take risks, collaborate, communicate their ideas, and fulfill their potential.

Meaningful Access to Resources- Members connect with the resources, opportunities and social support they need to heal, envision a future, and set a path forward to achieve their dreams.

Social Connectedness- Members experience solidarity and a sense of belonging, strengthen social skills, build supportive peer groups, and authentically engage with staff and mentors who encourage, challenge and care.

Health and Wellbeing- Members practice self-care and develop habits for lifelong health.




The Lower Eastside Girls Club (LESGC) supports young women and gender-expansive youth of color throughout New York City in leveraging their inner power to shape a better future for themselves, their community, and the world. Through free, year-round, innovative programming we connect young people with their passions, celebrate their curiosity, and channel their creative energy. We believe that the health and wellbeing of the young people we serve is intimately connected to the wellbeing of their families and their community. To address this need in 2022, we expanded our mission and service population with the Center for Wellbeing and Happiness, which provides free, full-spectrum wellness services addressing the social determinants of health for all generations and genders on the Lower East Side.

We understand that building a community in which the wellbeing of all generations and genders is collectively supported requires a holistic approach that addresses the social determinants of health.

With care and purposeful action, we create space for meaningful discoveries, healing, growth and evolution.

We build in partnership with our Community and recognize that we need solidarity and collaboration to build a just world. We are committed to uplifting the expertise and experience of Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) based in the Lower East Side community.

We embrace Radical Imagination, facilitating learning as a joyful, playful, and emancipatory act that allows our members to envision a present and future that breaks the boundaries and barriers of the status quo.

We affirm all identities and experiences.

We are rooted in Healing Justice. We believe a more equitable and just future is possible and commit to both acting upon and embodying the values of anti-racism, gender- and sexuality-based equality, and socioeconomic justice. We aim to address harm at its root cause and heal together.

We commit to Sustainability and environmental justice for ourselves, our community, our city and our world.

We foster Innovation through dynamic and proactive youth and community programming.

We are trailblazers, building new, intergenerational pathways for our members and community to thrive and to create their own transformative change.

We value shared wisdom and the exchange of knowledge passed down over generations and gained through life experiences.

Since 1996 The Lower Eastside Girls Club has connected young women and gender-expansive youth of color throughout New York City to healthy and successful futures through free, innovative year-round programming and mentoring. Every year, 1000+ of youth enter our Center for Community (5,000 sq. ft facility) that is filled with joy, power and possibility. Inside our doors members have access to Art, Design, Digital Media, Sound Studios, a STEM lab, a Maker shop, Sustainability Studies lab, a Planetarium, a Culinary Education Center, Movement and Performing Arts space, Rooftop Farm and all the programming to go along with it. Members and families enjoy this programing free of charge, year-round.

In 2022 Lower Eastside Girls Club (LESGC) opened the Center For Wellbeing & Happiness (CWBH), an adjacent 5,000 sq. ft. space where we provide wellness programming for all genders and generations at no cost. CWBH is a space grounded in healing justice, where local practitioners, expert practitioners, and health-based agencies can convene to address harm at its root cause and heal together. Collectively, we are creating a dynamic wellness hub that transforms self-care into community care. Programs are implemented in partnership with community practitioners and peer organizations. Partners include We Speak NYC, University Settlement Families Thriving program, RISE Parent Advocacy program, GOLES, Neighborhood Trust Financial Partners, Stacks + Joules, and Mama Glow doula training program, among others.



LESGC has financial processes and procedures in place, beginning with developing a detailed budget for the upcoming fiscal year. Our funds are tracked by program and donor (including individual donors, corporations, foundations, and government funders). Invoices are generated and completed by program staff members. All expenditures are submitted to our finance team. We are audited by an independent organization annually and have been in strong financial standing as a not-for-profit organization under the laws of the State of New York for over 25 years.

For over 27 years, LESGC has been committed to building a more just and equitable future alongside our community. Our founders are neighborhood mothers, aunties, and now grandmothers, who imagined radical alternatives for the next generation and came together to make it happen. We honor their legacy in our vision for change.

From an idea, to a shopping cart, to over two dozen locations throughout the neighborhood, LESGC finally raised money to construct our current facility, which opened its doors in 2013. We continue to thrive with our recent expansion, the Center for Wellbeing and Happiness, an adjacent 5,000sq.ft. space, allowing us to reach all genders and generations in the Lower East Side. We have become a global model for a community space, with partners in all 5 boroughs, across the country, and around the world.

In 2022 we opened our Center for Wellbeing & Happiness, creating a dynamic wellness hub that transforms self-care into community care. We are more fully meeting our families’ and community’s full needs—from the mental, emotional, spiritual, and social to the economic, environmental, and educational. As we celebrate our one year anniversary of CWBH we have registered nearly 1,000 members, engaged 30 instructors rooted in the Lower East Side community, offered 26 unique courses and 22 events, and reached nearly 3,000 visits to the space.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.45

Average of 4.78 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.1

Average of 7.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 17% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $199,797 -$24,614 -$149,924 $1,016,264 $2,638,662
As % of expenses 7.8% -0.8% -4.6% 31.2% 75.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$423,427 -$650,111 -$771,424 $449,263 $2,154,566
As % of expenses -13.3% -18.3% -20.0% 11.8% 54.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,765,158 $2,906,938 $3,084,543 $4,268,775 $6,138,524
Total revenue, % change over prior year -60.2% 5.1% 6.1% 38.4% 43.8%
Program services revenue 1.1% 0.9% 0.5% 0.5% 0.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.3% 0.7% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0%
Government grants 20.5% 20.7% 20.5% 22.2% 11.6%
All other grants and contributions 78.0% 76.4% 74.1% 77.3% 87.9%
Other revenue 0.0% 1.4% 4.8% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,565,361 $2,931,552 $3,234,467 $3,252,511 $3,499,862
Total expenses, % change over prior year -1.2% 14.3% 10.3% 0.6% 7.6%
Personnel 63.7% 63.1% 62.6% 63.9% 70.8%
Professional fees 12.8% 12.8% 10.6% 5.6% 1.2%
Occupancy 8.9% 8.3% 8.9% 6.2% 2.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 3.2% 6.3% 5.8%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 14.6% 15.8% 14.7% 18.1% 19.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,188,585 $3,557,049 $3,855,967 $3,819,512 $3,983,958
One month of savings $213,780 $244,296 $269,539 $271,043 $291,655
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $88,034 $419,005
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $5,526,218 $0 $1,529,585
Total full costs (estimated) $3,402,365 $3,801,345 $9,651,724 $4,178,589 $6,224,203

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 8.2 5.2 5.4 7.0 8.1
Months of cash and investments 8.2 5.2 5.4 7.0 8.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.7 7.5 5.1 8.0 11.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,752,972 $1,264,206 $1,455,564 $1,884,216 $2,351,126
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $207,244 $383,958 $376,193 $757,649 $1,029,995
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $19,396,575 $19,406,001 $24,932,217 $25,077,860 $26,607,445
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 15.3% 18.5% 16.9% 19.1% 19.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.6% 0.5% 25.2% 24.6% 21.3%
Unrestricted net assets $18,292,997 $17,642,886 $16,871,462 $17,320,725 $19,475,291
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $18,292,997 $17,642,886 $16,871,462 $17,320,725 $19,475,291

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Jenny Dembrow

Jenny Dembrow is Co-Executive Director of the Lower Eastside Girls Club of New York, where she has worked since its founding in 1996. When a group of neighborhood women convened to address the appalling lack of services for girls on the Lower East Side, Jenny became the first intern and has made the organization her life’s work. She has developed and maintains personal connections with every member and has been instrumental in the design of Girls Club’s unique program model while building robust partnerships and funding relationships. Seeing the organization through growth, expansion, and success over the years, she has never ceased in her commitment to the girls, their families, the staff, and the community. Jenny is a graduate of New York University.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

LOWER EASTSIDE GIRLS CLUB

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

De'Ara Balenger

Maestra

Term: 2018 -


Board co-chair

Gael Towey

Gael Towey & Co.

Term: 2015 -

Jen Gatien

Filmmaker

Cleo Wade

Poet, Author, Artist

Kimberly Aguilera

Tangerine

David Flores Wilson

Watts Capital

Xochitl Gonzalez

Screenwriter and novelist

Julie Lerner

Angel Investor

Kimberley Hatchett

Morgan Stanley

Anil Dash

Technology Entrepreneur

Rosario Dawson

Actress, Activist

Camille Joseph-Goldman

Charter Communications

Nexus Sea

O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Keisha Golding

JCrew

Carmen Rita Wong

Writer/Porducer

Woozae Kim

Marketing

Alain Sylvain

Founder and CEO of Sylvain

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/25/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.