PLATINUM2024

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL Parent

Girls on the Run is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a world where every girl knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams.

aka Girls on the Run   |   Charlotte, NC   |  www.girlsontherun.org
GuideStar Charity Check

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

EIN: 56-2201835


Mission

We inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum which creatively integrates running.

Ruling year info

2000

CEO

Ms. Elizabeth Kunz

Main address

PO Box 30667 PMB 65493

Charlotte, NC 28230-0667 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2201835

Subject area info

Running

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

Young girls

Students

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Girls' self-confidence begins to drop by age 9 and 50% of girls ages 10 to 13 experience bullying such as name calling and exclusion at a time when peer relationships become more central to girls' lives. Moreover, physical activity levels decline starting at age 10 and continue to decrease throughout adolescence. To address these concerns, Girls on the Run uses running and other physical activities as a platform for teaching life skills and promoting holistic health outcomes for girls in grades 3-8. The curriculum includes lessons that specifically target helping girls improve in Competence, Confidence, Caring, Character, Connection, and Contribution. Girls learn specific skills and strategies such as how to manage emotions, help others, make intentional decisions, and resolve conflict that they use at home, at school and with friends.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls on the Run

Girls on the Run is an evidence-based, physical activity-based program for girls in grades 3-5. During the program, girls learn specific skills and strategies such as how to manage emotions, help others, make intentional decisions, and resolve conflict. Additionally, girls are inspired to make a meaningful contribution to society through the development of a community impact project. The program ends with a celebratory, non-competitive 5K. Our program is flexible and fluid, offering a variety of ways to participate based on local community needs. From safely meeting in small teams to connecting virtually, or providing at home resources, our trained coaches are ready to help girls grow.

Inspires girls of all abilities to recognize and embrace their inner strength.
Small teams meet in person or connect virtually.
Trained volunteer coaches lead girls through research-based lessons designed to build confidence and other important life skills.
Girls complete a 5K, which provides a tangible sense of accomplishment.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
Family relationships
Ethnic and racial groups
Women and girls

Heart & Sole is a program for girls in grades 6-8 that addresses the whole girl — body, brain, heart, spirit and social connection — while meeting the unique needs of this age group. Girls learn about themselves, explore new ideas, cultivate empathy, and develop life skills that will help them through adolescence and beyond. The program ends with a celebratory, non-competitive 5K. Our program is flexible and fluid, offering a variety of ways to participate based on local community needs. From safely meeting in small teams to connecting virtually, or providing at home resources, our trained coaches are ready to help girls grow.
Addresses the whole girl — body, brain, heart, spirit and social connection.
Small teams meet in person or connect virtually.
Girls to embrace what makes them unique and practice skills that foster healthy relationships.
Each season ends with 5K, where girls celebrate who they are, how far they have come and where they want to go.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Family relationships
Women and girls

Camp GOTR is a week-long program for girls in grades 3-5 offered during school breaks. The program addresses the physical, social and emotional development of girls in a fun and inclusive setting. Girls enjoy interactive games, being physically active and expressing creativity through arts & crafts and storytelling. Throughout Camp GOTR, girls develop self-confidence and learn life skills they can use now and as they grow.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Women and girls
Family relationships
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

National Youth Sports Strategy Champion 2020

Awards

National Youth Sports Strategy Champion 2020

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Affiliations & memberships

Play Sports Coalition 2020

Million Coaches Challenge Cohort Organization 2021

Number of girls served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of girls served annually in the United States and Ottawa Canada.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed skills and attitudes to make physical activity a habit

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls on the Run empowers all girls to know and activate their limitless potential. Girls on the Run aims to ensure that our organization is relevant and engaging, known and respected, and that our mission-based programs are accessible to any person who wants to participate. Additionally, we aim to maintain a culture of inclusiveness that honors our core values while scaling the organization.

Girls on the Run has multiple strategic imperatives for the next 3 years, including:

Extending to communities that traditionally have not had access to programming

Optimizing council infrastructure to ensure sustainability and operational excellence

Developing new programmatic, operational, and merchandise initiatives to diversity revenue streams

Leveraging technology to ensure efficiency and effectiveness

Implementing processes to ensure program quality, integrity, and demand

Girls on the Run provides a safe and welcoming space where girls can thrive. Our intentional curriculum effectively integrates life skills learning with physical activity to provide girls with the skills and confidence to navigate their lives with purpose and joy. With a focus on quality program delivery, our formal volunteer training ensures that coaches are fostering positive, supportive relationships in a
caring, inclusive climate. Our intentional curriculum and National Coach Training have made the positive outcomes we see in the lives of the girls we serve possible.

A rigorous, independent study conducted by Dr. Maureen Weiss and her research team at University of Minnesota evaluated the impact of Girls on the Run on positive youth development. The study also looked at how Girls on the Run participants differ from a comparison group of girls in physical education or organized sports programs on developmental outcomes and life skills. Findings provide strong evidence that Girls on Run is effective in promoting positive youth development, including season-long and lasting change in competence, confidence, connection, character, caring, physical activity, and life skills. In Fact, Girls on the Run makes a stronger impact than organized sports and physical education programs in teaching life skills, demonstrating that strategies such as those for managing emotions, resolving conflict, helping others, and making intentional decisions are optimized when they are taught explicitly.

Now, more than ever, we are committed to our vision of a world where every girls knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams. As such, we have dedicated significant resources to formally assess and address barriers to participation in order to ensure that our program is accessible to any girl who wants to participate. We are being purposeful about developing best practices, relationships and resources to support our network of councils as they engage new sites to host our program and expand into underserved communities.

Girls on the Run was established in 1996 in Charlotte, North Carolina and in 2000, Girls on the Run International was established as a 501c3 organization. Since its inception 25 years ago, Girls on the Run has served more than 2 million girls.

In 2016, Girls on the Run commissioned a rigorous, independent study conducted by Dr. Maureen Weiss and her research team to evaluate the impact of Girls on the Run on positive youth development. In 2017, Girls on the Run was included as a top research-based program in a Social-Emotional Learning Guide developed by researchers at Harvard University and recognized by the National Afterschool Association (NAA) as one of the most influential after-school programs within the Health & Wellness area.

Currently, Girls on the Run annually serves over 200,000 girls in grades 3-8 spanning all 50 states. These girls are led by more than 50,000 trained volunteer coaches. Girls on the Run hosts the world's largest 5K series by number of events with over 330 events per year.

Girls on the Run will continue to invest resources into expanding program accessibility for girls. Girls on the Run is committed to serving diverse populations and supports 45% of its participants with financial assistance in the form of program scholarships, totaling over $13 million in fiscal year 2020. Some key components of achieving this extended reach of the program is through assessing and addressing barriers to program access – such as cost and transportation - and ensuring that our curricula is inclusive through creating curriculum modifications for girls with cognitive and physical disabilities. The organization is also turning an intentional eye toward expanding programming in previously unserved communities and working toward strengthening the overall sustainability of our local Girls on the Run councils to ensure the long-term growth of the program. Part of developing council sustainability is ensuring that local councils have adequate support and resources from Girls on the Run International to engage in strategic planning, recruit qualified staff and board members from diverse backgrounds, expand reach of the program, secure revenue, and maintain program integrity. New programmatic initiatives such as Camp GOTR, an one-week program that may be implemented during summer or non-traditional school times such as intersessions, are also being launched to extend program access to girls who have not been able to participate in Girls on the Run during the traditional school year. Lastly, the organization is focusing on increasing the impact of the program in local communities through working to recruit volunteer coaches that reflect the diversity of participants and communities served and assessing the needs of parents to improve their overall engagement in the program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.52

Average of 1.58 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6

Average of 5.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $535,263 $451,585 $2,827,482 -$209,930 $1,561,937
As % of expenses 8.8% 6.5% 45.9% -3.6% 22.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $480,058 $405,449 $2,779,154 -$437,935 $1,339,600
As % of expenses 7.8% 5.8% 44.8% -7.2% 18.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $5,930,079 $8,336,998 $6,414,949 $6,480,865 $7,946,339
Total revenue, % change over prior year -9.8% 40.6% -23.1% 1.0% 22.6%
Program services revenue 35.3% 26.7% 31.8% 25.1% 23.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.6% 0.9% 1.8% 0.8% 0.8%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 12.1% 16.5%
All other grants and contributions 49.8% 59.0% 50.1% 54.3% 53.4%
Other revenue 14.3% 13.4% 16.3% 7.7% 6.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $6,098,254 $6,963,604 $6,159,238 $5,848,861 $6,880,066
Total expenses, % change over prior year 24.8% 14.2% -11.6% -5.0% 17.6%
Personnel 46.4% 46.1% 60.4% 58.2% 59.1%
Professional fees 4.5% 4.4% 3.9% 2.1% 4.7%
Occupancy 3.9% 3.5% 3.9% 3.7% 0.1%
Interest 1.2% 0.9% 1.0% 0.0% 0.3%
Pass-through 25.3% 19.9% 9.8% 17.3% 18.2%
All other expenses 18.7% 25.1% 21.1% 18.7% 17.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $6,153,459 $7,009,740 $6,207,566 $6,076,866 $7,102,403
One month of savings $508,188 $580,300 $513,270 $487,405 $573,339
Debt principal payment $97,568 $0 $0 $672,800 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $226,560
Total full costs (estimated) $6,759,215 $7,590,040 $6,720,836 $7,237,071 $7,902,302

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.9 2.9 7.0 7.0 6.0
Months of cash and investments 5.3 6.9 11.0 12.8 10.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.8 5.8 12.0 11.9 12.4
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,466,490 $1,662,152 $3,607,973 $3,433,247 $3,426,320
Investments $1,220,685 $2,332,807 $2,046,969 $2,794,788 $2,484,372
Receivables $1,306,682 $2,176,637 $1,374,135 $2,428,735 $2,433,929
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $329,594 $348,198 $303,209 $139,942 $173,399
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 60.9% 70.9% 73.0% 66.4% 70.4%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 39.0% 38.6% 24.7% 24.5% 18.6%
Unrestricted net assets $3,079,152 $3,484,601 $6,263,755 $5,825,820 $7,165,420
Temporarily restricted net assets $951,337 $1,932,501 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $951,337 $1,932,501 $989,130 $2,271,602 $1,471,736
Total net assets $4,030,489 $5,417,102 $7,252,885 $8,097,422 $8,637,156

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Ms. Elizabeth Kunz

Liz spent the first decade of her professional life in corporate America before transitioning to the nonprofit sector in 1996. It was while working at the YMCA that Liz first learned about Girls on the Run. Its mission profoundly resonated with Liz’s personal mission and she started volunteering for the organization in 2002. She joined the staff as Chief Operating Officer in 2006 and has served as CEO since 2008. Liz has presided over an incredible time of organizational growth and brings significant expertise to Girls on the Run in setting strategic direction and creating an inclusive culture of empowerment, gratitude and joyful purpose.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

GIRLS ON THE RUN INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 04/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Sheila McGinley-Graziosi

McGinley-Graziosi Advisors, LLC

Term: 2023 - 2024

Phyllis Finley

Chris Cotton

Summit Park

Rakesh Gopalan

Troutman Pepper

Elizabeth Catlin

Bluestone Wealth Management

Monika Goyal MD, MSCE

Children’s National Hospital, The George Washington University

Scott Lilly

Apple

Dara Bazzano

T-Mobile

Diana Castro

McGuireWoods LLP

Rishi Mukhi

adidas

Joey Pointer

Fleet Feet

Nneka Ogwumike

WNBA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/18/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.