PLATINUM2024

Drage Second Chance Ranch

We believe that horses and humans deserve a second chance.

Morgan, UT   |  drage2ndchanceranch.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Drage Second Chance Ranch

EIN: 82-3571352


This organization is a 501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation (This organization has notified the IRS of its intention to convert to a public charity, and the IRS has ruled that grantors and contributors may consider it a public charity for the purpose of making contributions to the organization.).

Mission

Drage Second Chance Ranch (DSCR) provides a safe haven for horses who have been abused or neglected to be rescued, rehabilitated, reeducated, and rehomed. DSCR uses rescued horses to provide individuals struggling with addiction, mental illness, and disabilities the opportunity to do horseback riding, ground work, and therapy riding experiences. Our Riding Roots program provides free horsemanship and riding lessons for at-risk and low income children. Through guided cooperation and mutual understanding both the humans and the horses are better able to understand the world around them and trust themselves and their relationships with others once again.

Ruling year info

2018

Founder, Board member

Jessie Drage

Co-founder, Board member

Shaun Drage

Main address

4550 W Old Highway Rd

Morgan, UT 84050 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-3571352

Subject area info

Domesticated animals

Sports and recreation

Agriculture for youth

Community service for youth

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Non-adult children

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Other Services (D60)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Neglected and abused horses do not only have an acute need of placement, but the chronic need for adequate training and skill development to enable each horse to have a purpose and be able to find and maintain a loving, forever home. In addition, more preventative solutions for emotional and behavioral management to at-risk youth, teens, and adults is greatly needed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Riding Roots

Riding Roots is a program that allows kids who have no means to pay for lessons to be sponsored through group and individual riding lessons. We focus on teaching not just good horsemanship but also good humanity. The techniques, emotional maturity and foresight that horsemanship teaches can be life-changing for kids growing up in complicated family and financial situations. The goal of this program is to service low income and at-risk youth in Morgan and Weber Counties, Utah, by providing free riding lessons.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Non-adult children
At-risk youth

Our Work 2 Ride program engages youth over the age of 12 years in horsemanship. These students are given the opportunity to assist trainers and instructors at the Ranch a few hours a week in exchange for free riding lessons. They are educated in compassionate horse training, horse communication, riding, horse care and how to teach others. Our hope is that this program instills in youth qualities of teamwork, work ethic, and empathy with horses and people.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Horses rescued and rehabilitated.

Number of animals with freedom from discomfort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals with freedom from fear and distress

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of adults engaging in regular physical activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average youth self-rating of functioning and coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average parent/caretaker rating of child/youth functioning and coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Riding Roots

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Students enrolled in Riding Roots

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Riding Roots

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Our goals are to Rescue, Rehabilitate, Retrain, and Rehome horses in need. What makes us different is our retraining process; we take abused and neglected horses and establish trust with them, training them so they may live fulfilling lives partnered with knowledgeable owners. Our rehabilitation and retraining programs also provide an educational and personal growth experience for youth, teens and adults in need through this process.
2. Our Sustainable Development goals:
1. Health, well-being and behavioral management for at-risk horses.
2. Mental health, physical, and emotional well-being and behavioral management for at-risk youth and adults.
3. Provide opportunities for those without the financial means to learn and participate in horsemanship and have memorable positive experiences.

1. Our model of rescue, rehabilitate, retrain, and rehome horses is based on standardized horse handling methods known as natural horsemanship. Natural horsemanship uses compassionate understanding of equine instincts and behaviors to train and establish trust with horses. All staff and volunteers who work with our horses use the same curriculum, standardizing training and handling of our rescued horses.
2. Riding Roots is a program that allows at-risk youth who have no means to pay for lessons to be sponsored through group and individual riding lessons. We focus on teaching not just good horsemanship but also good humanity. The techniques, emotional maturity and foresight that horsemanship teaches can be life-changing for kids growing up in complicated family and financial situations.
3. Our Work 2 Ride program engages youth over the age of 12 years in horsemanship. These students are given the opportunity to assist trainers and instructors at the Ranch a few hours a week in exchange for free riding lessons. They are educated in compassionate horse training, horse communication, riding, horse care and how to teach others. Our hope is that this program instills in youth qualities of teamwork, work ethic, and empathy with horses and people.

Our capabilities for meeting our goals have a foundation on the dedication and expertise of our staff and volunteers. Selected rescued and retrained horses are used to provide horsemanship and riding lessons, and trail riding opportunities for paying customers. This funding helps support the basic day-to-day expenses of the Ranch. Individual sponsorship and grants for Riding Roots participants provides funding for at-risk youth; the number of youth in this program is dependent upon private and public contributions.

Our Work 2 Ride program is very successful, providing able assistants to our instructors and trainers. We currently have nine participants helping our instructors and trainers with lessons and horse training. Our Riding Roots program enrolled three participants in its inaugural year, with six others on a waiting list. This program is completely dependent upon sponsorship, grants and contributions.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Drage Second Chance Ranch
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Founder, Board member

Jessie Drage

Co-founder, Board member

Shaun Drage

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Board of directors
as of 01/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Jessie Drage

Shaun Drage

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Phyllis Wolfe

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Holli Streck

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Jessie Drage

Drage Second Chance Ranch

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/20/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.