GOLD2023

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Giving San Diego youth access, support, and opportunity to lead in today’s technology-driven world.

aka Wintriss Technical Schools, Inc.   |   San Diego, CA   |  www.jointheleague.org
GuideStar Charity Check

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

EIN: 20-4744610


Mission

We empower students to shape the ever-changing technological landscape through innovative, mastery-based computer science and engineering education, training League students to be the leaders and innovators in the workforce of the future.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Sarah Tuakli Cooper

Main address

12625 High Bluff Drive #113

San Diego, CA 92130 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Wintriss Technical Schools

EIN

20-4744610

Subject area info

Education

Elementary and secondary education

Computer science

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmer's mission is to equip young people with the skills, confidence, and creative problem-solving capacity needed to lead in a tech-driven world. We achieve this through mastery-based computer science and engineering education grounded in the values of inclusion and collaboration and enriched by industry professionals. Currently: _ There is a tremendous shortage of qualified computer programmers in the U.S. _ In 41 states, computer science does not count towards high school graduation requirements. _ It is 12 times less likely that low income and students of color have access to computer science courses in high school. _ In middle school, 74% of girls show interest in STEM, but when choosing a college major, just 0.3% high school girls select computer science. _ Women hold just 25% of U.S. technology jobs and only 5% of technology leadership jobs. _ Just 1 in 10 employees are Latinx/African American in tech companies.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

After-School Program Teaching Kids Java

A unique, after-school and weekend program that teaches Java computer programming to kids in grades 5-12. Instructors are a combination of paid staff and volunteer Java professionals. Our 10-level program starts with Java basics in an introductory workshop and continues on until students pass the Advanced Placement Computer Science A Exam and/or the professional Oracle Associate Certification Exam. Upper-level students return as Teaching Assistants for The League's lower-level classes.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

To help address the critical shortage of computer programmers in the United States, The League conducts a series of week-long workshops designed to introduce young people (5th - 12th grade) to the principles of Java programming. Approximately 80% of workshop graduates continue on with The League's weekly classes.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The League provides opportunities for students to participate in Tech Workforce Experiences at companies such as Sony, SDG&E, Hewlett-Packard, and Intuit in order to gain valuable career exposure. We also host San Diego Unified students under-represented in STEM fields on Tech Discovery Day field trips to League headquarters in Carmel Valley, where they learn about future career opportunities in San Diego's tech sector and beyond.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The League helps place under-resourced and under-represented students in paid internships at local tech companies and organizations. We also hire our students to work as paid interns at League headquarters and several satellite locations.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Innovation in Education Recognition 2012

San Diego Science Alliance

Inspiring Future Leaders 2017

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2015

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2017

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2018

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2019

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2020

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2021

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2022

SDG&E

Inspiring Future Leaders 2023

SDG&E

Woman of Influence in Technology 2021

SDBJ

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free registrants to classes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

After-School Program Teaching Kids Java

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Students qualifying for the Federal Free & Reduced Lunch Program receive 100% tuition scholarships.

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Related Program

Tech Workforce Visits

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The League provides opportunities for students to participate in Tech Workforce Experiences at companies such as Sony, SDG&E, Hewlett-Packard, and Intuit in order to gain valuable career exposure.

Number of free registrants to workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Java Workshops

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Students qualifying for the Federal Free & Reduced Lunch Program receive 100% tuition scholarships.

Number of employment placements defined as temporary or seasonal

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Paid Internship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The League helps place under-resourced and under-represented students in paid internships at local tech companies and organizations. We also hires students to work as paid interns in our own programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

A well-paying computer science career by one member can lift an entire family out of poverty!

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers provides training in computer programming for students from 5th grade through high school. Our long-term program provides students the opportunity to acquire both programming and critical thinking skills that will prepare them for their future, whether that is college or entry straight into the workforce.

In a small class environment, students master programming lessons that are challenging, engaging and fun. Students who progress through the League program will be prepared to pass the AP Computer Science A Exam, will work on collaborative team projects and can prepare for the Oracle Certified Programmer Exam.

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers 10-level curriculum is very unique: By programming games such as Pong, Tic Tac Toe, and Asteroids, students are kept interested in learning Object Oriented concepts. Each lesson is comprised of mini recipes where input of data results in the immediate output of a result, which allows the student to visualize what they are doing and make adjustments accordingly as needed. This fun approach provides great motivation. The school offers various programs like ongoing classes throughout the week, summer workshops and robotics competitions.

Classes are year-round and students can select from a variety of class times and days.
_ Extremely low student/teacher ratio (usually 6:1) allows for highly customized and personalized instruction
_ Students progress through 10 levels of instruction upon mastery of material
_ Advanced students are encouraged to mentor younger students by serving as a TA. This reinforces their own learning and provides confidence and motivation.

The League sponsors annual events for its students and encourages outreach to new students to come and explore coding.

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers has a strong and highly motivated team of staff teachers, volunteer teachers and mentors who are expert Java programmers. These teachers and mentors bring their own unique programming experience from their respective fields into the classroom and provide their students with opportunities to think about career options, the latest industry standard and progress, introduction to professional resources and organizations and opportunities to explore new ideas in confidence.

Our teachers, an even mix of men and women, are passionate about coding and share their excitement of discovery and learning willingly with their students to encourage exploration and finding joys that might just last a lifetime.

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers has grown from a dream with a handful of students to a robust program offering classes at multiple locations, libraries and schools. The League continues to work to reach deep into the community to provide a deeply rewarding and valuable programming educations to young students.

Each year a majority of our class of graduating seniors go on to universities to study computer science and engineering. Many come back in the summer to act as mentors and role models to the younger students.

The program currently provides financial aid to 30% of its students in under-resourced areas of San Diego County and we hope to reach a goal of 50% some day.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.52

Average of 9.92 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.4

Average of 3.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

28%

Average of 21% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $81,891 -$64,952 -$200,948 $92,710 -$13,233
As % of expenses 9.6% -6.3% -16.7% 10.8% -1.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $59,359 -$88,359 -$220,396 $71,815 -$34,368
As % of expenses 6.8% -8.4% -18.0% 8.1% -4.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $953,983 $953,923 $991,451 $958,539 $808,817
Total revenue, % change over prior year 51.6% 0.0% 3.9% -3.3% -15.6%
Program services revenue 84.4% 92.0% 87.0% 72.5% 57.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 23.5% 38.2%
All other grants and contributions 15.5% 7.7% 12.8% 4.0% 3.9%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $855,661 $1,034,223 $1,203,049 $861,466 $831,943
Total expenses, % change over prior year 67.5% 20.9% 16.3% -28.4% -3.4%
Personnel 68.4% 68.1% 66.1% 65.8% 57.9%
Professional fees 4.6% 4.3% 3.7% 4.8% 5.7%
Occupancy 12.2% 13.0% 18.3% 16.7% 20.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.2% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 14.7% 14.6% 11.7% 12.6% 16.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $878,193 $1,057,630 $1,222,497 $882,361 $853,078
One month of savings $71,305 $86,185 $100,254 $71,789 $69,329
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $46,441 $24,167 $69,079 $0 $21,609
Total full costs (estimated) $995,939 $1,167,982 $1,391,830 $954,150 $944,016

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 4.6 2.7 1.3 2.1 2.4
Months of cash and investments 4.6 2.7 1.3 2.1 2.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.7 2.0 -0.9 -0.2 -0.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $327,240 $232,764 $129,567 $150,090 $168,099
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $19,560 $19,150 $1,500 $5,151 $13,689
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $137,984 $162,151 $231,230 $241,057 $262,666
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 42.2% 50.3% 43.7% 50.6% 54.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 14.5% 25.2% 86.7% 62.9% 82.7%
Unrestricted net assets $344,113 $255,754 $35,358 $107,173 $72,805
Temporarily restricted net assets $28,098 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $28,098 $12,750 $2,100 $0 $0
Total net assets $372,211 $268,504 $37,458 $107,173 $72,805

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Sarah Tuakli Cooper

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Board of directors
as of 03/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr Eric Busboom

The LEAGUE of Amazing Programmers

Term: 2021 - 2024

Stanley Kurdziel

ResMed

Debra Schade

Solana Beach School Board Member

Dana Golan

SDG&E

Eric Busboom

Civic Knowledge

Victor Graham

San Marcos School Board Member

Kevin Lee

Software Architect

Uyen Tran

City of San Diego Library

Christine Dolan

The New Children's Museum

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/30/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.