PLATINUM2024

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

aka CFK Africa   |   Chapel Hill, NC   |  https://cfkafrica.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

EIN: 56-2248495


Mission

The mission of Carolina for Kibera, Inc (DBA CFK Africa) is work collaboratively with communities to improve public health and economic prosperity in informal settlements through participatory research, primary health care, and education.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Jeffrey Okoro

Director of Strategic Partnerships

Beth-Ann Kutchma

Main address

1700 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. CB 3277

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2248495

Subject area info

Education

Health

Economic development

Intergenerational mentoring

Youth peer mentoring

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Parents

Low-income people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community Health Systems (E21)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Poverty is a complex issue. Living in the the informal settlement of Kibera has many challenges related to basic health services, community well being, economic and unemployment hardships, as well as gender and ethic barriers that make opportunities scarce and limits the possibilities of a healthy life for so many. Poverty creates a landscape where hardships exist at almost every level, and therefore requires an approach that can provide support in every aspect of a person's life, from the essential needs of health and safety, to economic opportunities and financial well being, to a balanced psycho-social upbringing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Sports Program

The CFK Youth Sports Program addresses three key social problems: ethnic violence, youth unemployment, and public health. CFK brings together male and female youth of different ethnicities to promote community cooperation and development through sports. CFK runs the only all-girls soccer tournament in Kibera, and each CFK soccer team is required to be ethnically diverse. In this way, CFK helps assuage ethnic tension at a grassroots level. Organizational decisions are advised by a committee of male and female youth representatives from Kibera's eleven villages, and sports equipment is provided by the U.S. Soccer Foundation's Passback Program in partnership Sportsendeavors, Inc. (Hillsborough, NC).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Founded by the late Tabitha Atieno Festo, a widowed registered nurse from Kibera, Tabitha Medical Clinic is a community-based medical clinic that provides primary healthcare and youth-friendly services to Kibera residents in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CFK has provided training for volunteers in the community to become home-based care providers, a program that has received generous support from Stop Hunger Now. Tabitha Clinic welcomes volunteer medical students and faculty from UNC and Duke University Medical Schools.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Many of CFK Africa’s programs are centered on empowering girls and women, including reducing teen pregnancy, helping girls stay in school, fighting gender inequality on the job and providing maternity care. Women face in informal settlements and around the world multiple barriers to full participation, but they often first experience these challenges as younger girls, which can limit their participation and leadership later in life. Therefore, our Girls Empowerment programs help girls discover their rights and personal leadership capabilities as they build confidence through a combination of mentorship and advocacy efforts. Strategies include a Girls Parliament, Safe 24/7 group therapy to support survivors of sexual violence, and Funzo project. CFK Africa was the lead partner in the development, inception and piloting of the ‘Girl-Centered Program Design’ & ‘Safe Spaces’ program in Kenya in collaboration with The Population Council, which has been implemented by NGOs around the world.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Although school in Kenya is subsidized by the government up to grade 8, high school is still too expensive for most impoverished Kenyans. The Lux Sit & Jim Rogers Scholarship Program provides qualifying CFK participants and community members with funds to cover up to 100% of the tuition fees for all four years of high school.

More Than Just a Scholarship
CFK provides an intensive three-month leadership training curriculum for scholarship recipients, which prepares them for the challenges of life after secondary school.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The Sexual Reproductive Health Program works closely with Tabitha Medical Clinic to provide HIV/AIDS testing and counseling, sexual health workshops, and one-on-one counseling services for the community. SRH educators also work across all programs to speak with young members of the community about HIV/AIDS and sexual health in a casual, non-threatening environment. The Menstrual Hygiene Lab at CFK Africa's HQ in Kibera educates adolescent girls and boys on menstrual hygiene and sexual and reproductive health, addresses menstrual shame, and provides critical resources for menstrual hygiene management. Since opening in May 2022, the lab has equipped 540 youth with information and resources to promote menstrual health in the community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

Alarmed by the abnormally high rates of malnutrition in Kibera, which deviate from national trends, CFK Africa partners with stakeholders address this pressing issue. CFK Africa’s nutrition programming improves the nutrition status of children under 5 in informal settlements in Kenya by increasing community awareness of healthy nutrition practices, training caregivers and community health volunteers to identify and refer malnourished children for treatment, screening and treating children under-5 for malnutrition, building the capacity of government facilities in additional informal settlements to be able to screen and treat children under-5 for malnutrition, and supporting de-worming and Vitamin A supplementation efforts.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents

The Tabitha Maternity Center opened in September 2019 and was designed to improve health outcomes for mothers and newborns in Kibera. In order to maximize accessibility, the facility is centrally located, has access to a road, and is open 24 hours a day. CFK facilitates transportation and engages with community leaders to ensure the security and safety of all patients. The program provides timely antenatal care with regular contact with skilled health personnel (i.e. doctor, nurse, or midwife), which allows women to prepare for delivery and understand warning signs during pregnancy and childbirth.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Parents

This one of a kind center in Kibera focuses specifically on serving the health and developmental needs of young people, ages 10-24. The Center provides a space for young people to feel in control of their holistic healthcare journey encompassing physical, social, emotional, and mental health initiatives. It fosters an environment that supports the protection and promotion of the health of young people by increasing their capacity to make informed choices. Leadership opportunities are provided to a select group of youth in the community using a Youth Peer Provider (YPP) model. The YPPs are trained to help educate their peers and encourage participation during center-based outreach.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Hero of Global Health 2006

Time Magazine, Gates Foundation

Reflections of Hope Award 2008

Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum

Corporate Philanthropy Award 2022

Triangle Business Journal

Best Facility in Nairobi County - Tabitha Medical Clinic 2023

Ciheb Kenya

Affiliations & memberships

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill 2001

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Lux Sit & Jim Rogers Scholarship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our scholarship project supports the highest performing young people in informal settlements across Kenya through a mix of scholarships, leadership training, and immersive field trips.

Tabitha Medical Clinic Patient Visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tabitha Medical Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Tabitha Medical Clinic provides quality healthcare to those in informal settlement communities who would not otherwise have access to reliable and affordable care.

Number of computer literacy/skills/technology courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Lux Sit & Jim Rogers Scholarship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our digital skills & vocational training is reaching hundreds of youth in Kibera focusing on vocational skills and financial literacy initiatives, preparing them to enter the job market competitively.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As a community, we envision Kibera to be free of ethnic violence, where youth have a safe space to learn about each other's backgrounds and to appreciate diversity, where HIV/AIDS prevention is widely available and affordable, where healthcare in general is affordable and of high quality, where basic needs such as food or water are part of Kibera's every day life and infrastructure, where girls and women feel empowered to make choices for themselves and for their bodies, and where both boys and girls have access to a quality education and work readiness training to give them the tools to find, keep, and create employment.

Our three priority areas consist of 1) enabling affordable access to quality health care, 2) advancing locally-owned businesses through financial literacy and business skills trainings, and 3) fostering self-confidence, leadership, and understanding across gender and ethnic fault lines in order to build a strong community.

CFK staff members do not simply deliver goods and services to Kibera. Instead, they collaborate with community members to develop long-lasting, sustainable programs that help solve complex issues. Through direct involvement, community members become ambassadors of positive impact for their families and friends. As older participants assume leadership roles, they multiply impact by growing programs, engaging their personal networks and inspiring the next generation of leaders.The positive impact of these local leaders spreads, or 'cascades,' through the community.

Carolina for Kibera believes that community problems require local solutions run by local leaders. Youth are particularly important for Kibera's future; as one of the fastest growing areas of Kenya, as many as half of Kibera's residents are under the age of fifteen. Despite these sobering statistics, we believe the dedicated, resilient youth of Kibera will grow into a new generation of wise, empathetic leaders capable of affecting change.

Carolina for Kibera believes that catalyzing social and economic change within a community can only be sustainable when driven by those that are most affected by community issues. In keeping with that belief, CFK's organizational structure reflects our values. Our staff in Kenya is made up of sixty full and part time staff – all are Kenyan and many are from Kibera. In the US, CFK employs minimal full-time staff. In addition, hundreds of dedicated volunteers and board members support our Kenyan staff in whatever ways they can with no thought of reward.

Carolina for Kibera is also a major affiliated entity of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As such, UNC provides significant in-kind support for CFK, including office space, accounting services, and most importantly, access to the university's vast network of talented faculty, staff, students, and alumni. As a result from partnering with UNC and Duke University, we have established global partnerships with several additional organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control, ONE.org, Global Giving, One World Futbol, Harvard University, Stanford University, and MIT. These organizations serve and help build our programs on the ground in Kibera by developing initiatives and raising awareness of CFK's work.

Lastly, we receive support from generous individual friends and donors throughout the world. 98% of our donors are individuals, all of whom have directly helped to provide critical medical care, empower young girls, give children access to education, build sports programs for children, and provide community members with the means to start or grow a business.

When fighting poverty and violence through peace, a victory of any size is a remarkable victory. Through our programs, the youth of Kibera help create change every day by spreading messages of peace and progress, and by inspiring others to do the same.

Last year, our programs extended services to thousands of Kiberans, young and old. CFK engaged 2,191 youth in sports programming, awarded 77 student scholarships through our education program. 100% of our graduating scholars qualify for higher education based on their national exam scores. Our Tabitha Medical Clinic treated 34,475 patients. 4,768 adolescent girls were served through our Daughters United program which conducted 25 safe spaces giving girls the opportunity to express themselves. Opened in September 2019 in response to community needs, our Tabitha Maternity Home opened. Last year the home served 2,241 patients, conducted 431 safe devlieries, and reported zero maternal deaths.

Combating poverty is an ongoing process. But with empowered youth leaders making strides towards peaceful collaboration, progress is achieved every day.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

41.98

Average of 244.75 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14

Average of 19.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12%

Average of 12% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Carolina For Kibera, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

* This organization changed its fiscal year accounting period in 2020. Please refer to its 2020 990s for more information.

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 * 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $212,805 $46,057 -$18,666 $273,388 -$364,104
As % of expenses 29.0% 5.2% -1.8% 25.6% -26.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $211,678 $45,432 -$18,944 $272,831 -$367,884
As % of expenses 28.8% 5.1% -1.8% 25.5% -26.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $685,064 $931,309 $1,482,732 $2,762,390 $1,380,234
Total revenue, % change over prior year -2.9% 35.9% 59.2% 86.3% -50.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.7% 1.5% 0.1% 2.8% 7.9%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 87.8% 90.6% 94.8% 97.2% 92.1%
Other revenue 10.5% 7.9% 5.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $733,490 $888,677 $1,065,403 $1,069,069 $1,368,824
Total expenses, % change over prior year 6.7% 21.2% 19.9% 0.3% 28.0%
Personnel 30.4% 21.5% 20.0% 23.0% 19.9%
Professional fees 4.1% 7.2% 5.0% 3.6% 3.7%
Occupancy 0.7% 0.6% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 56.3% 61.9% 69.0% 65.0% 70.2%
All other expenses 8.5% 8.9% 5.7% 8.3% 6.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $734,617 $889,302 $1,065,681 $1,069,626 $1,372,604
One month of savings $61,124 $74,056 $88,784 $89,089 $114,069
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $9,250 $11,662
Total full costs (estimated) $795,741 $963,358 $1,154,465 $1,167,965 $1,498,335

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 20.9 15.7 15.8 18.7 14.0
Months of cash and investments 45.9 36.8 32.9 57.3 46.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 23.4 19.9 16.4 18.5 11.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,279,142 $1,160,535 $1,402,885 $1,662,448 $1,600,375
Investments $1,527,869 $1,565,412 $1,521,045 $3,444,905 $3,684,902
Receivables $52,450 $225,000 $405,000 $500,000 $27,179
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $5,814 $4,901 $4,901 $15,825 $27,487
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 79.3% 87.0% 92.6% 33.1% 32.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 1.2% 0.7%
Unrestricted net assets $1,431,196 $1,476,628 $1,457,684 $1,655,293 $1,287,409
Temporarily restricted net assets $258,339 $298,854 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $1,172,000 $1,172,000 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,430,339 $1,470,854 $1,868,657 $3,898,651 $4,010,170
Total net assets $2,861,535 $2,947,482 $3,326,341 $5,553,944 $5,297,579

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Jeffrey Okoro

With over 15 years of experience, Jeffrey brings a steadfast commitment to community-led development, passion for the power of education, and a growth-oriented mindset to lead CFK Africa. He has strong roots in the Kibera community and finds joy in providing services that help uplift adolescents and youth. Growing up in Kibera and experiencing the power of education firsthand, Jeffrey serves as a powerful role model for youth in informal settlements. Okoro first volunteered with CFK Africa as a youth leader after post-election violence in 2009. He has since served as a peer mentor, administrative assistant, project officer, program coordinator, and most recently as deputy director. Jeffrey is committed to empowering people to empower themselves. He served as a 2019 Metis Fellow, working toward accelerating the pace of education reform across Africa. Jeffrey earned a Bachelor of Science in Project Planning and Management from Moi University and a certificate in Business Mathematics.

Director of Strategic Partnerships

Beth-Ann Kutchma

Beth-Ann is a non-profit leader, higher education administrator, and multimedia producer with 20 years of experience specializing in global research and education development, data analysis, and international evaluation. She has completed professional work with organizations including Carnegie Mellon University, the Nature Conservancy, the UNC Mathematics and Science Education Network, and served as a Senior Program Officer and Fulbright Program Advisor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Beth-Ann served over three terms on CFK Africa’s Board of Directors and produced Without a Fight, an award-winning documentary that explores how soccer can facilitate social change in Kibera. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Terrestrial Ecology from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown. She enjoys playing bass guitar in a good rock and roll show on occasion.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Rye Barcott

Co-Founder, Carolina for Kibera and Co-Founder and CEO, With Honor

Term: 2023 - 2026

Dr. Jennifer Coffman

James Madison University

Brett Bullington

Angel Investor

Francis Kibet

Duke Energy

Claire Rotich

PwC

Joseph Ng’ang’a

responsAbility Africa Ltd

George Kuria

ACRE Africa

Dickson Omondi

National Democratic Institute for International Affairs

Dr. Susan Maman

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

James Ndiang’ui

Counterpart International

Dr. Steve Arnold

Education Activist

Dr. Jim Herrington

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (retired)

Jane Kilonzo

Bank of Africa (retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/7/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
African
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/16/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.