GOLD2024

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Plant the seeds of freedom by cultivating creativity and harvesting mutual empathy.

aka ICAF   |   Washington, DC   |  https://icaf.org
GuideStar Charity Check

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

EIN: 52-2032649


Mission

Mission To seed American schoolchildren's imagination, cultivate their creativity, and grow mutual empathy among them and their peers worldwide through the universal language of art for a more peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable future. Vision To democratize creativity for the AI Revolution and metastasize empathy for “a more perfect union.” Services We organize the Arts Olympiad, a free school art program, produce the World Children’s Festival at the National Mall across the U.S. Capitol, and publish the ad-free ChildArt quarterly. We organize Healing Art Programs, Peace through Art Programs, interactive art exhibitions, and youth panels at conferences. ICAF pioneered STEAMS education (STEM + Art + Sport) for children's holistic development

Notes from the nonprofit

Accomplishments -More than five million children worldwide have participated in and benefited from our programs since 1997 -In 1998 we hosted the first national children's art festival in U.S. history and since 1999 we have produced the World Children's Festival every 4 years as children's Olympics -We are spearheading a global movement to cultivate children's creativity and grow their empathy through the universal language of art. Goals -To bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to one million underserved children worldwide who lack creative outlets or empathy training -To produce the 7th World Children's Festival at The National Mall in the summer of 2024 as a global celebration of "Creativity, Diversity, and Unity" in our nation's capital -To bring the "Children of the World's Favorite Sport" exhibition to major events and venues -To promote art produced by a child as the most honest and purest form of human creative expression

Ruling year info

1997

Founder and Chair

Dr. Ashfaq M. Ishaq

Director

Ms. Katty Guerami

Main address

2549 Virginia Avenue, NW Post Office Box 58133

Washington, DC 20037 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-2032649

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Elementary and secondary education

Environment

Health

Human rights

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Families

Academics

NTEE code info

Visual Arts Organizations (A40)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Problem Statement: Though individual creativity advances prosperity and sustainability, our schools preoccupied with teaching for the test overlook students’ creative development. Though mutual empathy builds community and is a perquisite for “a more perfect union,” the social media ubiquity has sharpened divisions, creating social silos that despise outgroups. Theory of Change: Whether the future is heavenly or cataclysmic depends on the children because they create it. We cultivate children’s creativity and grow mutual empathy through the arts for a prosperous, sustainable, and peaceful future. Our school art program, the Arts Olympiad, transforms students’ self-identity for higher-order thinking and enhanced self-worth. Our World Children's Festival provides a transformative experience that infuses creativity with empathy so the children become creative-empaths. Our ChildArt magazine fosters creative and empathic development and strengthens global competencies.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to low-income schools

We address declining creativity and rising obesity through our Arts Olympiad, a free-of-charge school art program that introduces students to the "Artist-Athlete Ideal" of the creative mind and healthy body. The Arts Olympiad awaken their dormant "inner artist" or their slumbering "inner athlete." The school becomes a more integrated and compassionate community of "artists-athletes."

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Academics
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

We bring to Washington, D.C. the world's most imaginative schoolchildren--its child artists--to foster their creativity and infuse it with empathy at the 7th World Children's Festival (WCF), which is held at The National and is free and open to the public celebration of "Creativity, Diversity, Unity."
Empathy does not come naturally. We must learn to see each other as inseparably-human from ourselves. We must intuit past the material boundaries that exaggerate differences. We must actively educate others so they choose to experience empathy.
Support the children plan and organize their world festival, then come join them and help shape the future.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Artists and performers

Our magazine published ad-free since 1998, fosters children's creative and empathic development.
Sample issue > https://icaf.org/ChangingEnvironment

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Parents
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

ICAF organizes healing arts programs to revive faith in nature of child victims of natural disasters.

Population(s) Served
Victims of disaster

ICAF conducts peace programs to restore trust in humanity of children living in conflict zones.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

Innovation of the Week 2002

Peter F Drucker Foundation

Excellence in Humanitarian Service 2004

World Cultural Open, Seoul

Ziegfeld Award for Outstanding International Leadership in Arts Education 2011

United States Society for Education Through the Arts

Distinguished Service Award 2011

United States Sports Academy

Affiliations & memberships

United States Olympic Committee 2006

United States Sports Academy 2004

United States Society for Education through Art 2002

X Reality Safety Initiative (XRSI) 2022

RadicalxChange Foundation 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have the ability to use eye-hand coordination, strength, and motor control to use age-appropriate tools and utensils effectively

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to low-income schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In the summer of 2021, despite the COVID challenges ICAF produced the 6th World Children's Festival at The National Mall across the U.S. Capitol.

Number of children who have a sense of their own feelings and an ability to express empathy for others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to low-income schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Testing for this takes place at the World Children's Festival every four years. The most recent festival took place on July 30 - August 1, 2021 at the National Mall across the U.S. Capitol.

Number of children who have the ability to use language for expression and to communicate with others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to low-income schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Students describe their artwork to others, thus including with their artistic expression their creative writing proficiency.

Number of favorable critic reviews/awards of art produced given by media or peers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Bring the 7th Arts Olympiad to low-income schools

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Selection every year of the winners of the Saving Endangered Species Youth Art Contest. In addition, judging of works produced by children at the World Children's Festival held every four years.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We seek a creative and empathic future. For this, we train and inspire students to become "creative-empaths" who are eager and capable of working together to transform our wounded world into a wondrous one.

"Schooling "Creative-Empaths" for a Brighter and Peaceful Future" > https://icaf.org/CreativeEmpaths

ICAF spearheads a global movement to democratize creativity for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and grow empathy universally to sever the intergenerational transmission of hatred and trauma. To achieve these objectives, ICAF organizes a school art program as an intervention, produces a global celebration for children’s empowerment, and publishes a quarterly to inspire learners of all ages.

The Arts Olympiad school art program targets students aged 8 to 12—a cohort most vulnerable to the well-documented "4th-grade slump" in creativity. The Arts Olympiad curricula motivate students to break out of the mold and embrace the "Artist-Athlete Ideal" of a creative mind and healthy body (mens sana in corpore sano). Students realize that mind and body reflect each other because the state of one's mind can have an epigenetic effect. The curricula aim to awaken a student’s dormant "inner artist" or slumbering "inner athlete," and develops mutual understanding between young athletes and young artists. Students are encouraged to reframe their self-identity and their revised self-image solidifies when they depict themselves as "artist-athletes" in their artworks for the Arts Olympiad contests. With increases in the number of artist-athletes, the school transforms into a creative, healthy, cooperative community.

To build a creative community for the future, ICAF produces the World Children's Festival quadrennially at the National Mall across the U.S. Capitol. Though free and open to the public, the Festival’s educational focus is the “artist-athletes” who come together from school districts across the U.S. and many foreign countries. ICAF has pioneered STEAMS education to integrate Art and Sport with STEM disciplines as a blueprint for the festival. This innovative step-by-step approach uniquely develops mutual empathy. The three-day festival opens with Health and Environment Day to create a sense of collective purpose that arises from shared interests. Creativity and Imagination Day follows to enhance children's creative potential through empowerment and self-learning. Collaborative artmaking, empathy training, and leadership workshops on the final Peace and Leadership Day inspire students to become "creative-empaths"—who are eager and equipped to work together to transform this wounded world into a wondrous one.

Published ad-free since 1998, the ChildArt quarterly showcases STEAMS education, promotes holistic education, and fosters global competencies. Each issue is on a distinct theme or subject that range from color to morality. ICAF has collaborated with organizations such as the American Institutes for Architects, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Institutes of Health to produce issues about architecture, art and health, cognitive development, and neuroscience.

The ICAF organized the very first national children's art festival in U.S. history, held in Washington, D.C. in 1998. Since then the ICAF has been a pioneer in introducing children to the Artist-Athlete Ideal of the creative mind and healthy body as well as introducing teachers to STEAMS Education, which integrates Arts and Sport with STEM disciplines for children's holistic education. The ICAF has an unparalleled track record as the national arts and creativity organization for American children and as the sole international institution for the creative and empathic development of the world's children.

Since its founding in 1997, ICAF has been changing the world, one child at a time. Its impact is felt in Washington, DC where its World Children’s Festival (WCF) is held, in every U.S. state and territory where its Arts Olympiad is organized, and throughout the world where children can participate in the Arts Olympiad and represent their cities and communities at the WCF.

By fostering children’s creativity and developing their empathy, ICAF fulfills six of the 27 Social Development Goals (SGDs) of 2030UN. The ICAF’s work reduces poverty, promotes good health, brings quality education, ensures gender equality, reduces inequities, and build peace in communities and the world at large.

Measurable Impact
In terms of numbers, approximately five million children have befitted from ICAF, producing original works under the Arts Olympiad and other ICAF programs. An estimated 2,500,000 individuals have participated in or attended ICAFs festivals and exhibitions that have taken place in over a dozen major cities worldwide. This number includes the audiences who have attended ICAF’s special events such as conferences and symposia. Nearly one million children, parents, teachers and librarians comprise the total readership since 1998 of ICAF’s ChildArt magazine, published on a quarterly basis. On a daily basis, a few thousand children worldwide learn about the ICAF from their peers or online, gaining confidence in themselves as creators (not merely pupils or consumers, recognizing that their imagination is seedbed for discovery and innovation, and telling themselves that their art is the most honest and purest form of human creative expression.

Immeasurable Impact
The work of ICAF changes the environment and its impact on children. Children are emboldened, their self-esteem enhanced, and they aspire to be creative and make positive contributions to society and the world as a whole. Some of these influences become epigenetic or eternal, shaping the new generation and the next one that follows. Evidence on specific influences is provided below:

The International Child Art Foundation: Source: Schoolarts Magazine, May 2021, page 38
The Art of Empathy: Source: The STEAM Journal, December 2018
Transformative impact on children. Source: ChildArt Jan-March 2017
Celebrating creativity, diversity, and unity. Source: ChildArt Oct-Dec 2015
Global impact. Source: UNESCO Observatory e-Journal and Journal of Urban Cultural Research
Impact in Brazil, China, Croatia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Israel, New Zealand, Palestine, Romania, Russia, and the UAE. Source: ChildArt April-June 2006
Most of the beneficiaries are aged 8 to 12, who are empowered to overcome the "4th-grade slump" in creativity. Roughly 660 million children worldwide belong to this age group, hence ICAF must exponentially expand its outreach to engage and benefit many more children. For this, your support is essential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Average of 0.00 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Average of 0.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

%

Average of 0% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $1,320 $19,599 -$567 $205 $405
As % of expenses 1.3% 13.4% -2.1% 0.4% 1.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $1,320 $19,599 -$567 $205 $405
As % of expenses 1.3% 13.4% -2.1% 0.4% 1.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $99,045 $141,400 $26,793 $58,427 $34,406
Total revenue, % change over prior year -14.4% 42.8% -81.1% 118.1% -41.1%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $98,431 $146,687 $27,360 $58,222 $33,763
Total expenses, % change over prior year -14.6% 49.0% -81.3% 112.8% -42.0%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 31.3% 56.0%
Professional fees 0.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 11.6% 7.1% 46.4% 48.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 88.2% 92.9% 53.5% 20.7% 44.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Total expenses (after depreciation) $98,431 $146,687 $27,360 $58,222 $33,763
One month of savings $8,203 $12,224 $2,280 $4,852 $2,814
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $529,026
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $106,634 $158,911 $29,640 $63,074 $565,603

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Months of cash 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2
Months of cash and investments 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -30.6 -18.9 -101.8 -47.8 -82.1
Balance sheet composition info 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Cash $1,194 $793 $226 $431 $643
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 190.3% 177.8% 178.1% 178.0% 78759.5%
Unrestricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets -$251,193 -$231,594 -$232,161 -$231,956 -$231,108

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Material data errors No No No No Yes

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Founder and Chair

Dr. Ashfaq M. Ishaq

A civil sector leader for the past twenty-five years, Dr. Ishaq has served as a World Bank economist, a university professor, and a CEO. For a more prosperous and peaceful future, he founded ICAF in 1997 to cultivate children's creativity and grow mutual empathy through the arts. Under his visionary leadership, ICAF’s school art program (the Arts Olympiad) has grown over the years into the world’s largest. Every four years, he produces the World Children’s Festival at the National Mall across the U.S. Capitol as the “Olympics” of children’s imagination. Since 1998, he has published the ChildArt magazine free of commercial advertisements. He has examined and judged more children's artworks than anyone alive or dead. More than five million children have participated in and benefited from his programs and events worldwide. He inspires them to become "creative-empaths" so they can transform our wounded world into a wonderous one.

Director

Katty Guerami

Ms. Guerami directs initiatives and develops activities that advance agency and organizational vision, in particular impact investment opportunities that utilize children's creations in product design by mainstream industries. She promotes programming in U.S. schools to engage a broader community in an array of ICAF programs and activities. She holds a BS and a Masters degree, both from the George Washington University.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

INTERNATIONAL CHILD ART FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 01/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Dr Ashfaq Ishaq

International Child Art Foundation

Term: 2020 - 2024


Board co-chair

Ms. Katty Guerami

International Child Art Foundation

Term: 2020 - 2024

Lady Ngozi Ando

Female Artist Association of Nigeria

Maria Claudia Albini

Professor

Katty Guerami

International Child Art Foundation

Ashfaq Ishaq

International Child Art Foundation

Sergey Eylanbekov

Sculptor

Mihai Nadin

University of Texas, Dallas

Aurora Sidney Ando

Clinical therapist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/11/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/01/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.