PLATINUM2023

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Discover. Develop. Connect. Support.

aka OWL   |   LEXINGTON, KY   |  www.owlinc.net

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GuideStar Charity Check

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

EIN: 61-0593023


Mission

OWL’s mission is to partner with individuals, businesses, and communities to assist those requiring support with factors impacting their employability.

Ruling year info

1963

CEO

Mr. Walter Tony Higgins

Main address

650 KENNEDY RD

LEXINGTON, KY 40511 USA

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Formerly known as

Opportunity Workshop of Lexington

EIN

61-0593023

Subject area info

Vocational post-secondary education

Foundations

Nonprofits

Economic development

Construction

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Population served info

Refugees and displaced people

Internally displaced people

Economically disadvantaged people

Incarcerated people

People with disabilities

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Employment Training (J22)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Employment and Training Services

OWL offers a variety of programs and services geared toward helping people obtain and maintain long-term successful employment in a completive, integrative workforce. We assist individuals in discovering their strengths and developing their skills to prepare for employment. We connect our individuals with employers offering jobs meeting their individual employment goals and look for the best possible match for job seekers and employers alike. Because our emphasis is on the person as a whole, we also connect those we serve to needed wrap-around services and provide support on the job, as required, to help them maintain their employment.

At OWL, we know the path to success looks a little different for everyone. That is why we offer individualized programming, one-on-one support, and a diverse range of services.

Population(s) Served

OWL is a Community Service Provider of the KY Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR). Participants will have diverse opportunities to work with an OVR counselor and an OWL employment coordinator to discover the best job match for them, develop employability skills, be connected to community services and employers, and supported in maintaining employment. The following are services offered upon referral from the KY Office of Vocational Rehabilitation.

• Vocational Assessment and Evaluation
• Employment
• Training/Certifications

Population(s) Served

Workforce Connections is a training and employment program to assist individuals in obtaining skills and connecting to employment. Participants will have the opportunity to discover career opportunities, gain new skills, connect to community resources and jobs, and obtain support in maintaining employment.

Interested participants may choose from five different training/certification tracks:
1. Career Exploration and Workplace Essential Skills/Kentucky Essential Skills Certification (KESC)
2. Customer Service Representative Training/Certification (CSRC)
3. Manufacturing Production Work-based Learning and Forklift Certification
4. Fast-Track Forklift Certification
5. Skilled Trade Academy

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people
Immigrants and migrants
Incarcerated people
Immigrants and migrants

SNAP Employment and Training is a program for SNAP recipients to develop skills leading to long-term employment in their field of interest. Services are provided through a contract with the Department of Community Based Services. The purpose is to provide services for those on the SNAP E&T program, which are required by DCBS to participate in job/workplace essential skills training or employment 20 hours per week.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Veterans

Where we work

Accreditations

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services 2011

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 2020

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients passing job skill competency exams or assessments after completing course

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Employment and Training Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2022, more than half (52%) of program participants completed services.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Employment and Training Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of employer partners offering jobs to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Workforce Connections

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Red Mile, Burlington, Family Dollar, Walmart, Kroger, Dairy Queen, Chick Fil A

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Vocational Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our main objective is always to create a world without barriers to employment and help people reach their vocational goals. Increasing the number of people OWL can service through counseling, education, coaching, and job training is one goal. Another is increasing the number of businesses that use the Lexington Manufacturing Center (A division of OWL) for their manufacturing needs.

1. The People

It all starts with people. Individuals come to OWL facing a variety of barriers. They are part of forgotten or disenfranchised populations in the work force, such as those with mental and physical disabilities or those that are returning to the work force after being incarcerated. They most often come to OWL through one of our referral sources.



2. What We Offer Them

Through comprehensive and individualized programming, we assist our program participants in meeting their vocational and personal goals with three main divisions. First, the OWL Center offers vocational and employment services such as skills training and job placement. Second is our Advancing Capabilities & Enhancing Skills (ACES) division where we offer a variety of Medicaid waiver services that facilitate inclusion and personal development. Lastly, OWL owns and operates a manufacturing company, the Lexington Manufacturing Center (LMC), which by offering quality manufacturing services is able to assist the other divisions financially as well as serve as a training ground for participants when appropriate- allowing them to earn income, receive real-world skills training, and gain work experience.



3. The Good

The drive for meaningful results is why we do what we do. Essentially, OWL assists the community in three main ways. First, by giving second changes that create sustainable opportunities for some of the community’s most disenfranchised populations- improving livelihoods for these individuals and their families. Second, by equipping the community with a trained and skilled work force and lastly, In LMC’s ability to provide high-quality manufacturing services to community businesses and industries.

OWL's largest resource for accomplishing our goal is people. Our dedicated staff  are talented professionals that strive daily to eliminate barriers to employment. The exciting new program, ACES, has allowed OWL to hire more individuals specialized in their area to increase the number of people we can serve and diversify the ways we can serve them. In addition to the new ACES program positions, there are two other new positions- Communications and Special Projects Coordinator as well as Job Developer, who each assist in building mutually beneficial relationships between OWL and the community to both gain support and recognize opportunities for growth and improvement. In essence, these new positions and the new program will increase the number of people OWL can serve and increase overall community support in terms of how many people we can place in outside positions, the financial support we receive, and an increase in awareness.

OWL's most recent major accomplishment is adding ACES (Advancing Capabilities and Enhancing Skills) to the programs that are offered is one way we are expanding the ways we serve our program participants. This program allows OWL to offer individuals with disabilities the opportunity to live a rich and full life and help them reach their personal as well as professional goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.46

Average of 1.45 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.6

Average of 2.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

25%

Average of 21% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$3,458 -$74,512 -$195,209 $1,474,334 $1,022,664
As % of expenses -0.3% -6.2% -17.4% 120.7% 58.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$25,646 -$93,077 -$209,482 $1,453,784 $972,152
As % of expenses -1.9% -7.6% -18.5% 117.1% 54.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,205,877 $1,071,091 $852,770 $2,389,040 $3,227,853
Total revenue, % change over prior year 18.4% -11.2% -20.4% 180.2% 35.1%
Program services revenue 48.4% 39.1% 44.2% 13.8% 17.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.8% 0.7% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 6.9% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 13.8% 19.7% 4.5% 1.0% 0.4%
Other revenue 37.0% 40.6% 51.2% 78.2% 82.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,294,896 $1,210,293 $1,119,552 $1,221,262 $1,745,368
Total expenses, % change over prior year 16.1% -6.5% -7.5% 9.1% 42.9%
Personnel 80.5% 81.7% 76.5% 67.4% 64.1%
Professional fees 1.6% 1.9% 4.3% 2.7% 1.5%
Occupancy 1.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.1% 9.2%
Interest 0.2% 0.3% 1.2% 0.5% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 16.8% 16.1% 18.0% 28.3% 25.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,317,084 $1,228,858 $1,133,825 $1,241,812 $1,795,880
One month of savings $107,908 $100,858 $93,296 $101,772 $145,447
Debt principal payment $75,683 $55,385 $10,618 $204,705 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,500,675 $1,385,101 $1,237,739 $1,548,289 $1,941,327

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.5 0.4 1.0 19.9 0.6
Months of cash and investments 5.2 5.2 6.0 27.5 32.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 6.4 5.8 4.5 26.3 25.2
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $54,082 $37,304 $95,038 $2,027,107 $92,280
Investments $509,378 $484,737 $460,702 $767,504 $4,678,868
Receivables $263,854 $211,485 $109,326 $121,592 $116,237
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,608,886 $3,637,040 $3,593,824 $1,960,714 $906,585
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 57.5% 59.0% 60.0% 78.4% 62.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 24.5% 24.2% 30.8% 14.2% 26.9%
Unrestricted net assets $1,800,643 $1,707,566 $1,498,084 $2,951,868 $3,836,059
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $1,800,643 $1,707,566 $1,498,084 $2,951,868 $3,836,059

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Mr. Walter Tony Higgins

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

OPPORTUNITY FOR WORK AND LEARNING

Board of directors
as of 09/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Sarah Mattingly

Dinsmore

Tyrone Tyra

Commerce Lex

Karen Hawkins

Hawkins HR Consulting

Sarah Mattingly

Dinsmore & Shohl LLP

Mark Richardson

TempurSealy

Shawn Rogers

Chris Tabler

LGE KU

Laura Dake

Sam Reinhart

Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC

Cassie Carter

Dinsmore

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.