PLATINUM2024

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Improving the lives of India’s underprivileged, with a special focus on women, children, and youth.

aka AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION (AIF)   |   New York, NY   |  www.aif.org
GuideStar Charity Check

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

EIN: 13-4159765


Mission

The American India Foundation (AIF) is committed to improving the lives of India’s underprivileged—with a special focus on women, children, and youth—through high impact interventions in education, livelihoods, and public health. As a binational organization strengthening the bridge between the civil societies of the world’s largest and two most powerful democracies, AIF also cultivates a robust platform for leadership development through its fellowship program, nurturing the next generation of globally minded changemakers.

Notes from the nonprofit

AIF is dedicated to gender equity and poverty alleviation through the multipronged approach of addressing education, livelihoods, public health, climate change mitigation, and leadership development. We design bold solutions to complex problems for communities that need it the most. Working with stakeholders from the government and civil soceity, we drive change that is sustianble and scaleable. Driven by values of transparency, secularism, and nonpartisanship, we have positvely affected over 16.5 million people across 35 states and union territories in India. Our programs are designed to address and support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals that nations have pledged to reach by 2030.

Ruling year info

2001

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Nishant Pandey

Main address

211 E43rd Street Suite 1900

New York, NY 10017 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

13-4159765

Subject area info

Equal opportunity in education

Early childhood education

Health care access

Disaster relief

International development

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women and girls

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

International Relief (Q33)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The American India Foundation is committed to improving the lives of Indias underprivileged, with a special focus on women, children, and youth. AIF does this through high impact interventions in education, health, and livelihoods, because poverty is multidimensional. AIFs programs emphasize inclusive models that focus on the unique needs of girls and women to achieve gender equity as a basis for sustainable change. Founded in 2001, we work in some of the most remote geographies of India, contributing to many of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Since 2001, AIF has raised over $225M, impacted the lives of 16.5 million people, across 35 states with the support of 330 partners including community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector. The pandemic has greatly impacted health and education for children, especially of migrant parents and the livelihood of many street vendors. Our goal is to help them through post covid interventions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI) utilizes a public-private partnership model to reduce maternal and child mortality by providing resources and support, thus empowering local communities to care for their mothers and children while improving the local health systems.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Women and girls

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) provides access to quality education opportunities to children in areas of seasonal migration, while also advocating to communities and governments the universal right to education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Digital Equalizer utilizes technology to bridge the educational and digital divide in India by transforming under-resourced schools into dynamic places to teach and learn through collaborative, project-based learning.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Banyan Impact Fellowship Program in India builds the next generation of service leadership committed to lasting change for underprivileged communities across India, while strengthening the civil sector landscape to be more efficient and effective.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adults

Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) provides underprivileged youth with skills training and access to formal employment opportunities.
As part AIF's Covid response, AIF is launching Project Entre-prerana which will be a systemic transformation intervention aimed at reviving the livelihoods of 1 million street vendors, micro entrepreneurs in India, all of whom have been badly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Ability Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE) trains persons with disabilities and facilitates their entry into the job market through advocacy, promoting inclusive growth in India.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Unemployed people

AIF was one of the first non-profits to provide support to the most vulnerable communities in India. The measures provided include critical life-saving medical equipment, PPEs for frontline health workers, hygiene kits for ASHAs and Anganwadi workers, and ration kits for the needy and elderly, including migrants who lost their livelihoods due to lockdown. Team AIF served more than 500,000 underprivileged people with Covid relief. AIF is now transitioning from relief work to rehabilitation of those badly affected by the pandemic.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Special Jury Award: Covid-19 Relief & Response 2020

IHW Council- CSR Health Impact Awards

Partners Excellence Award 2019

Hero Motocorp

Partners Excellence Award 2019

Aadi Shakti Mission Trust

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children empowered with interactive STEM experiences and innovations in our Digital Equalizer (DE) Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Digital Equalizer (DE)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of villages affected by migration that have been helped by our LAMP program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Learning and Migration Program (LAMP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of people helped with livelihood opportunities by our Livelihoods Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of newborns served by our MANSI program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Banyan Impact Fellows in service with NGO's and Social Enterprise across India

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AIF aims to contribute to building an India, where all people can gain access to affordable education, health care and livelihood opportunities, and where all Indians can realize their full potential. AIF engages, informs, and inspires those passionate about India by building a trusted bridge, and secures a channel for philanthropic funding from the United States and other regions across the world, and its effective investment in the most innovative and scalable projects in India. AIF’s focus on community engagement, emphasizing our commitment towards ensuring sustainable development in India. Our programs create venues for affordable education, healthcare, livelihood opportunities, and leadership development with the support received from community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector.

1. Education

1.a. Digital Equalizer: Through the Digital Equalizer program, AIF transforms under-resourced schools into dynamic places to teach and learn through collaborative, project-based learning (SDG 4) by utilizing technology to bridge the educational and digital divide in India.
1.b. Learning and Migration Program (LAMP): AIF’s Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) provides access to quality education opportunities to children in areas of seasonal migration (SDG 4), while also advocating to communities and governments the universal right to education.

2. Livelihoods

2.a. Ability Based Livelihood Empowerment (ABLE): By training Persons with Disabilities (PwDs), AIF’s Ability-Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE) program facilitates their entry into the job market (SDG 8) through advocacy, and promotes inclusive growth in India (SDG 10).
2.b. Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST): Nourishing the vast potential of India’s youth, AIF’s Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) program provides underprivileged youth with skills training and access to formal employment opportunities.
2.c. Project Entre-prerana: AIF’s Project Entre-prerana is a systemic transformation intervention aimed at reviving the livelihoods of 1 million street vendors, micro entrepreneurs in India, all of whom have been badly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

3. Public Health: AIF’s Maternal and Newborn Survival Initiative (MANSI) program utilizes a public-private partnership model to reduce maternal and child mortality in rural and impoverished areas in India. Covering the states of Andhra Pradesh, Uttarakhand, and Odisha in India, MANSI empowers local communities to care for their mothers and children, while improving the local health systems by providing resources and support.

4. Leadership Development: The AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship provides a platform to young American and Indian professionals to develop their skills, resources and the network needed to become the next generation of leaders with a social conscience. The Fellowship creates a community of socially engaged, global citizens, who represent the leaders of tomorrow.

Since 2001, AIF has impacted the lives of 16.5 million people, across 35 states with support of 330 partners including institutional and government agencies, and private sector. AIF's programs deliver sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods to empower underprivileged children, women and men in India. AIF ensures to uphold principles of secularism, transparency, and accountability in all of our activities by focusing on:

1) Designing programs based on evidence, need and effective approaches, AIF and its teams continue to make efforts to understand communities needs and aspirations, and use approaches that have shown to be effective.
2) Monitoring the programs by making mid-course corrections, if required.
3) Field trials of innovations
4) Documenting the program so that the communities can learn, and also evaluating as to what could be done better, and how the program can be made more cost-effective,
5) Contributing towards knowledge management such as new programmatic approaches, new knowledge.
6) Expanding partnerships with existing and prospective partners, considering that low-cost solutions come from partners, and so does sustainability
7) Using advocacy to distribute knowledge gathered to help the development sector in becoming for efficient and effective.
8) Building capacities of key stakeholders and service providers through content development, training the trainers, partners meet, industry exposure, sharing of best practices, technical support etc.
9) Proving support services such as financing, institution building, platform building, marketing, up-skilling and entrepreneurship.

Digital Equalizer-AIFs flagship education program that facilitates equitable access to quality education to students from government schools across 28 states and 7 union territories of India. The program bridges the educational and digital divide in India and prepares students, especially young girls, for a career and life.

Targeting secondary students in grades 6-10, the Program primarily trains educators in basic computer literacy, and pedagogical methodologies that together bring creativity, diversity, and real-life examples into the school curriculum through the use of technology.
T
he ABLE program aims to create pathways that:

Identify and expand PwD participation in formal Indian labor markets.
Ensure inclusion of disabled persons in mainstream services such as skills training, employment promotion, and social protection schemes.
Promote inclusive growth and equity.

With offices in New York and California,four chapters across the U.S., and India operations headquartered in New Delhi, AIF is transforming lives across 35 states of India, while addressing development issues on a regional, country, and international scale.
AIFs programs are aligned with the UNs Sustainable Development Goals, a framework for collaboration between the profit and the non-profit sectors with complementary capabilities. Delivering sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods; our teams work hard to reach some of the remotest geographies in India.

1. Diverse backgrounds and vast experiences of the AIF board members, and the teams from US and India: The genesis of American India Foundation (AIF) lies in the leadership demonstrated by corporate leaders and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs in the USA, in response to a call by the former US President Bill Clinton in the aftermath of the Gujarat earthquake in 2001. Resources and support were mobilized quickly, primarily led by the business leaders of Indian origin, for relief and rehabilitation of the Gujarat earthquake victims. Since then AIF has been guided by humanitarian values coupled with corporate principles of trust, transparency and efficiency and has gone on to benefit not just from the support of US-based Corporate leaders of Indian origin but also from India-based business leaders as well business leaders of non-Indian origin too. AIF is further supported by a diverse team of program leaders and team members, who implement various programs to empower underprivileged children, women and men in India. (https://aif.org/about/people/)

2. Learnings gathered and quality outcomes achieved over the last 20 years: Delivering sustainable and scale-able solutions in the fields of health, education, and livelihoods, AIF has impacted the lives of 6.7 million people, across 26 states with support of 330 partners. We ensure to incorporated the learnings gathered over the last 20 years, to implement high impact interventions in education, livelihoods, public health and leadership development. https://aif.org/our-work/

3. Diverse Partnerships: AIF understands that cross-cutting partnerships are crucial to mobilizing communities for large-scale change. Poverty is complex, and poor families and individuals face many challenges that are interwoven and manifold. For this reason, partnerships that work across AIFs thematic areas of education, public health and livelihoods are especially essential for sustainable impact. Since the obstacles AIF seeks to overcome are systemic, multi-dimensional and challenging, multi-year, partnerships are vital for achieving the desired impact.

Since 2001, AIF has impacted the lives of 16.5 million people, across 35 states with support of 330 partners including community members, institutional and government agencies, and the private sector.

1. Education:

1.a. Digital Equalizer Impact: 7,252,965 Children Empowered with Interactive STEM Experiences, 212,585 Teachers Trained in STEM and Technology focussed pedagogy, 32,596 Schools Transformed through innovative teaching and learning practices

1.b. Learning and Migration Program (LAMP) impact:
1,359,794 Children at risk of distressed seasonal migration empowered with access to quality education, 5,238
Villages steered to eliminate obstacles to access education, 17 States and Union Territories covered

2. Livelihoods:

2.a. Ability-Based Livelihoods Empowerment (ABLE): ABLE has trained 1,897 PwDs in market-relevant skills and
1,212 PwDs linked with sustainable livelihoods

2.b. Market Aligned Skills Training (MAST) Impact:
103,799 Jobs created for disadvantaged youth across Retail, IT, Geriatric Care, Electrical, Automotive, and Other Industries, 290,292 Disadvantaged youth, women trained in market-relevant skills, 246 Skilling centers established and 396,648 Street vendors and nano-entrepreneurs empowered through Entre-Prerana

3. The MANSI impact:
349,505 Pregnant women served, 249,835 Newborns served, 10,416 Front line workers trained (ASHAs and AWWs)
and 168,852 Children (under 5 yrs) reached, 76,218 Adolescent girls reached and 8,453 No of Villages Covered

4. AIF Banyan Impact Fellowship Program in India: Since the first cohort who assisted in the post-earthquake rehabilitation of Gujarat in 2001, the AIF Clinton Fellowship Program has successfully paired 539 Fellows in service with 238 host organizations across 25 States, thus representing a collective force and organized network dedicated to social change in India.

5. COVID-19 Relief Response: Cumulative Impact

1,869,341 Beneficiaries Served, 377,872 Health Personnel Benefited, 31 States & Union Territories, 2,682 Portable Hospital Beds, 53 Oxygen Plants, 5,414 Oxygen Concentrators, 127,628 Total Equipment, 30,720 Single-use Ventilators, 50 Cold Storage Units, 550 Oxygen Cylinders, 31,023 Pulse Oximeters, 228,585 PPE Kits

6. AIF has also provided support with relief efforts during many climate disasters with the most recent one being teh floods in Himachal Pradesh

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Due to Covid, on field data collection has been challenging

Financials

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.83

Average of 10.55 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.2

Average of 4.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

25%

Average of 25% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Apr 01 - Mar 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $1,713,351 $1,258,170 $1,271,248 $3,144,624 $4,613,675
As % of expenses 29.5% 16.8% 15.2% 11.9% 30.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $1,707,904 $1,252,639 $1,261,093 $3,139,150 $4,609,621
As % of expenses 29.4% 16.7% 15.1% 11.9% 30.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $6,826,176 $8,271,087 $10,355,759 $45,093,906 $15,079,194
Total revenue, % change over prior year -16.3% 21.2% 25.2% 335.4% -66.6%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.2% 1.6% 0.8% 0.1% 2.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 3.2% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 97.3% 97.3% 94.8% 99.9% 96.9%
Other revenue 1.5% 1.1% 1.3% 0.0% 1.1%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $5,801,120 $7,481,109 $8,365,353 $26,411,064 $15,252,731
Total expenses, % change over prior year -22.7% 29.0% 11.8% 215.7% -42.2%
Personnel 30.8% 25.4% 30.1% 8.9% 15.5%
Professional fees 3.7% 5.8% 4.2% 2.1% 6.1%
Occupancy 4.7% 3.8% 2.6% 0.6% 1.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 45.9% 56.9% 59.2% 86.0% 72.6%
All other expenses 14.8% 8.1% 4.0% 2.4% 4.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $5,806,567 $7,486,640 $8,375,508 $26,416,538 $15,256,785
One month of savings $483,427 $623,426 $697,113 $2,200,922 $1,271,061
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $10,595 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $6,289,994 $8,120,661 $9,072,621 $28,617,460 $16,527,846

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 3.9 3.5 5.4 4.8 2.2
Months of cash and investments 14.0 13.4 15.2 12.6 24.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 7.1 7.5 8.5 4.1 10.8
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $1,888,475 $2,157,844 $3,764,743 $10,531,208 $2,737,809
Investments $4,879,932 $6,187,339 $6,854,555 $17,218,552 $27,958,909
Receivables $1,908,885 $1,257,750 $502,885 $10,000 $240,000
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $144,549 $155,144 $157,042 $157,042 $157,042
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 87.8% 85.3% 90.8% 94.3% 96.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 11.8% 10.3% 3.0% 15.8% 15.2%
Unrestricted net assets $3,455,876 $4,708,515 $5,969,608 $9,108,758 $13,718,379
Temporarily restricted net assets $3,991,680 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $600,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $4,591,680 $4,162,582 $4,867,337 $20,293,557 $15,593,677
Total net assets $8,047,556 $8,871,097 $10,836,945 $29,402,315 $29,312,056

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Nishant Pandey

Nishant started with global charity 'Oxfam' as the Programme Officer for South India where he designed and developed value-chain programmes on the theme of 'power in markets'. Later, he moved to Oxfam's global HQ in Oxford to lead on program development and management in 12 countries like Russia Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco to name a few. He then led the policy and campaign portfolio for Oxfam in the region based at Jerusalem. He was appointed as AIF's Country Director in 2015, where he led and improved several programs in Education, Livelihood and Public health. As a British Chevening scholar, Nishant has done Master's in International Development & Finance from University of Leicester, UK. He also has M.A in Economics ,B.A. in Anthropology and Economics as well as Advanced Management Program from Henley Business School, University of Reading,UK.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

AMERICAN INDIA FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 04/03/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Ms Lata Krishnan

Chief Financial Officer, Shah Capital Partners

Term: 2001 - 2027


Board co-chair

Mr. Harit Talwar

Head of Digital Finance, Goldman, Sachs & Co.

Term: 2019 - 2027

Pradeep Kashyap, Director Emeritus

Community volunteer

Lata Krishnan

Chief Financial Officer, Shah Capital Partners

Diaz Nesamoney

President & CEO, Jivox Corporation

Ajay Banga, CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Executive Chairman, MasterCard

Harit Talwar

Head of Digital Finance, Goldman, Sachs & Co.

Venkat Srinivasan

Managing Director, FountainHead Boston

Vimal Bahuguna

President, Drona Group, LLC

Ashish Dhawan

Founder and Chairman, Central Square Foundation and Ashoka University

Ash Lilani

Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Saama Capital

Rohit Kapoor

Vice Chairman and CEO, EXL

Nishant Pandey

Chief Executive Officer

Raj Sharma

Managing Director of Wealth Management and Head, The Sharma Group

Michael Steinberg

Managing Partner, Steinberg Asset Management

Jay Tambe

Partner, Jones Day

Victor J Menezes,CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Retired Senior Vice Chairman, Citigroup

Raj Seshadri

President- Data & Services, Mastercard

Vivek Bantwal

Co-Head Global Financing Group, Goldman Sachs

Tasneem Chipty

Managing Director, AlixPartners

Vijay Vishwanath

Partner, Bain & Company

Shashin Shah

Founder & Managing Partner, Think Investments

Brian J.G Pereira

President & CEO, Visterra

Sumir Chadha

Co-Founder & Managing Director, WestBridge Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/22/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/22/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser