PLATINUM2024

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

aka CVHS   |   East Montpelier, VT   |  www.centralvermonthumane.org
GuideStar Charity Check

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

EIN: 03-0217066


Mission

Central Vermont Humane Society envisions a time when all companion animals are wanted, cared for, and loved. Guided by the Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare, our mission is to protect and advocate for animals in need, and to build a humane community that promotes compassion and seeks to strengthen the human-animal bond. We accomplish our mission by working collaboratively with other shelters, rescues and community partners. We shelter the lost and homeless, reuniting them with their families, or facilitating adoption into new homes. We encourage spay and neuter of companion animals and offer support and education to animal guardians. We strive to exemplify the core values of respect and compassion for life and to meet or exceed the best standards of practice for shelter care and operations.

Ruling year info

1966

Co-Executive Director, Finance & Development

Laurie Garrison PhD

Co-Executive Director, Programs and Operations

Erika Holm

Main address

1589 VT Rte 14S

East Montpelier, VT 05651 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

03-0217066

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Human-animal interactions

Community organizing

Community service

Population served info

Adults

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Y01)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Central Vermont Humane Society serves our community to protect and advocate for all animals, to provide shelter for stray and homeless animals, and to help people in crisis by helping their animals. People problems like job loss, homelessness, divorce, illness, all can be devastating to humans as well as the pets they love. Over 80% of the animals who come to us are from our local Vermont communities, and the majority of those come from people who need us to help with their pets.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal sheltering and Adoptions

Adoptions, Foster Care, Behavior Help Line, Low-Income Spay/Neuter, Educational Outreach

Population(s) Served
Adults

We provide training classes for dogs and their owners, both those from our own Adoption Center and members of the general public, with classes arranged according to the ages, types, and needs of the dogs: puppy kindergarten, basic manners, agility training, small dog, large dog, reactive dog

Population(s) Served
Adults

CVHS collaborates with local law enforcement and animal control officers to support cases involving animal cruelty and neglect. CVHS also participates in legislative advocacy for legal changes to protect animal welfare.

Population(s) Served
Adults

CVHS actively solicits, screens, and trains dedicated volunteers who serve as foster care families, with fostering as an interim stage in preparing animals for adoption. These would be very young puppies and kittens who require frequent round the clock bottle feeding or special needs adult animals recovering from injuries or medical procedures or who need more individualized attention in order to assist them in overcoming excessive shyness (as an example). We also have an active foster-to-adopt program in which qualified families can take an animal home for a trial-run; these most often result in permanent adoption placement. The foster program not only provides individual animals with the extra and individualized care they need but also frees up additional space in our Adoption Center, thereby allowing us to take in  more animals than our physical capacity at the Center would otherwise allow.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal sheltering and Adoptions

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Adoptions have been decreasing since 2022 because local animals we care for lately need more behavioral and/or more medical care, so they stay longer. This reduces our capacity a bit.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Central Vermont Humane Society works to solve pet homelessness and pet overpopulation. We work to save every adoptable animal and we go the extra mile for each pet in our care, providing whatever medical or behavior support they need as well as all the time they need to find their new home. We strive to create a compassionate community were people, regardless of their means, have the resources and support to properly care for their pets. CVHS envisions a time when all companion animals are wanted, cared for, and loved.

CVHS has an “Open Heart, Open Door” policy- we are here for the people and animals in our community who need us. We treat people with kindness and compassion, and work to increase the ability of our community, regardless of means, to be responsible pet guardians. We provide humane education to children as well as adults, advocate for stronger legislation to end animal cruelty, and provide counseling, supplies, and resources to help pet guardians keep their pets, and when they need it, we take in their pets.

CVHS has a strong, skilled and professional staff who are well-trained in their positions. CVHS enjoys a large team of dedicated volunteers who help in all departments, and we have an engaged and active volunteer Board of Trustees. We have strong and loyal support from our community members.

Central Vermont Humane Society saves over 1000 animals a year. We will continue to create programs and services to build a humane community that promotes compassion and seeks to strengthen the human-animal bond.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

63.34

Average of 17.52 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5

Average of 3.3 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9%

Average of 8% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $70,867 $348,383 $1,016,235 -$152,363 $97,141
As % of expenses 10.3% 59.7% 172.8% -22.3% 13.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $35,518 $315,294 $972,203 -$190,249 $61,633
As % of expenses 4.9% 51.2% 153.8% -26.4% 8.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $763,704 $925,156 $1,444,751 $852,828 $722,832
Total revenue, % change over prior year -9.9% 21.1% 56.2% -41.0% -15.2%
Program services revenue 25.8% 19.1% 13.4% 16.8% 21.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.1% 0.8% 0.9% 2.1% 4.9%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 5.8% 0.1% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 69.6% 76.8% 73.0% 72.4% 73.9%
Other revenue 3.5% 3.3% 7.0% 8.7% 0.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $690,938 $583,260 $587,988 $682,483 $720,008
Total expenses, % change over prior year -5.7% -15.6% 0.8% 16.1% 5.5%
Personnel 64.6% 60.3% 64.9% 65.4% 62.4%
Professional fees 5.3% 5.4% 5.6% 5.3% 7.7%
Occupancy 6.0% 5.6% 5.1% 5.8% 6.2%
Interest 1.4% 1.5% 0.6% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 22.6% 27.2% 23.9% 23.5% 23.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $726,287 $616,349 $632,020 $720,369 $755,516
One month of savings $57,578 $48,605 $48,999 $56,874 $60,001
Debt principal payment $83,555 $0 $248,005 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $41,252 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $867,420 $664,954 $929,024 $818,495 $815,517

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 2.8 7.5 7.1 6.0 5.0
Months of cash and investments 8.1 16.7 28.5 22.5 27.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 9.0 17.2 34.1 25.9 26.2
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $162,293 $365,836 $347,238 $342,546 $300,687
Investments $302,634 $446,781 $1,051,179 $934,385 $1,342,038
Receivables $0 $0 $185 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,136,629 $1,138,760 $1,154,536 $1,195,787 $1,195,787
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 34.4% 34.8% 38.1% 40.0% 42.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 14.6% 15.1% 1.2% 1.1% 1.1%
Unrestricted net assets $1,096,044 $1,411,338 $2,383,541 $2,193,292 $2,254,925
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $50,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000
Total net assets $1,146,044 $1,461,338 $2,433,541 $2,243,292 $2,304,925

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Executive Director, Finance & Development

Laurie Garrison PhD

Before coming to CVHS, Laurie was Executive Director of Monmouth County SPCA in Eatontown, NJ, one of the largest animal welfare organizations in that state. She was Senior Director of Applied Research for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) based in New York City, and before her animal career began, she was a Senior Voice Engineer at AT&T Labs for over 17 years. Laurie also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Vermont Humane Federation.

Co-Executive Director, Programs and Operations

Erika Holm

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

CENTRAL VERMONT HUMANE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Sandra Meyerhofer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.