PLATINUM2024

United Way of Central Iowa

Fostering an equitable, engaged, and empowered community - one UNITED to THRIVE.

aka UWCI   |   Des Moines, IA   |  https://www.unitedwaydm.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

United Way of Central Iowa

EIN: 42-0680425


Mission

United Way of Central Iowa's mission is to improve lives by uniting the caring power of our community. Our Vision is to engage community to empower all. Our core values are compassion, integrity, community engagement, responsiveness, and striving for excellence.

Ruling year info

1938

President

Ms. Mary Sellers

Main address

1111 Ninth Street, Suite 100

Des Moines, IA 50314 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

42-0680425

Subject area info

Foundations

Nonprofits

Human services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Economically disadvantaged people

Health

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

United Way of Central Iowa fosters an equitable, engaged, and empowered community - one where we are united in the 5 Elements of a Thriving Community to improve the lives of every central Iowan. The 5 Elements are Essential Needs, Early Childhood Success, Education Success, Economic Opportunity, and Health & Well-being.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

United Way of Central Iowa is a neutral convener, bringing together individuals and organizations that share a common goal of creating a thriving community. Our service area includes Polk, Dallas, and Warren counties. We guide vision and strategy in the areas of Essential Needs, Early Childhood Success, Education Success, Economic Opportunity, and Health & Well-being. We see ourselves as a community backbone organization, one that focuses on collective impact, where organizations come together to solve specific societal problems using sound strategy, aligned efforts, and big-picture measures of success. Empowering our community to make equitable change in these areas allows us to collectively make a greater impact.

Population(s) Served

Essential Needs is one of United Way of Central Iowa's 5 Elements of a Thriving Community. When central Iowan's thrive, they live in stable, safe places with access to nutritious foods. United Way of Central Iowa's strategies under the Essential Needs focus are to increase availability of and reduce barriers to accessing healthy food for central Iowans with limited resources and access; provide supports needed to keep people in affordable, stable, and healthy homes; and increase opportunities for safe, health-promoting spaces where central Iowans live, work, and play.

Population(s) Served

Early Childhood Success is one of United Way of Central Iowa's 5 Elements of a Thriving Community. When central Iowans thrive, our children start out healthy and ready to learn - laying the foundation for success throughout their life. United Way of Central Iowa's strategies within Early Childhood Success are to address barriers to prenatal care and improve birth outcomes; increase access to and availability to prevention, early identification, and early intervention services for children birth-5 years to promote healthy physical and mental development; and increase access to and participation of children in a quality childcare or preschool settings that promote kindergarten readiness. In addition, United Way promotes policies and practices to improve systems and provide equitable access to central Iowans in this focus area.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Health

Education Success is one of United Way of Central Iowa's 5 Elements of a Thriving Community. When central Iowans are thriving, our youth are academically successful and have a plan for their future - whether it be post-secondary education, career training, or work. Strategies for fostering Education Success include improving student success; increasing student access to quality, culturally relevant activities/programs; promoting successful transitions into and/or out of middle school; increasing student access to career exploration, activities, and awareness; and increasing high school students who graduate with a plan beyond high school. In addition, United Way advocates for policies and practices that improve our Education systems and provide equitable access to central Iowa youth.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Incarcerated people

Economic Opportunity is one of United Way of Central Iowa's 5 Elements of a Thriving Community. When central Iowans are thriving, they have sufficient income and opportunities to build wealth - saving for assets that break the cycle of poverty for future generations. Strategies for fostering Economic Opportunity in central Iowa are providing access to skills and supports leading to jobs that provide income needed to be self-sufficient with the opportunity to build wealth; providing access to adult basic education, post-secondary education, training, and supports required for quality jobs; providing individuals access to financial services and supports to manage their money, save for assets, and purchase/invest in assets - including developing, financing and sustaining small business; and maximizing use of the tax code to boost income through appropriate filing status and use of tax credits and deduction.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Refugees and displaced people
Immigrants
Incarcerated people

Health & Well-Being is one of United Way of Central Iowa's 5 Elements of a Thriving Community. When central Iowans are thriving, every person in our community has physical and mental well-being. Strategies for us to foster Health & Well-Being in central Iowa include reducing barriers to accessing regular, quality, culturally appropriate physical and mental health care (g. stigma, language, trust, cost, proximity, availability of workforce); as well as promoting and supporting central Iowans’ sense of purpose, belonging, and connectedness. In addition, United Way advocates for policies and practices improving Health and Well-Being systems that provide equitable access to central Iowans.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

4 Star Rating 2020

Charity Navigator

Center of Excellence 2009

United Way Worldwide

Most Influential Nonprofit 2021

Business Publications Corporation

Top 25 Most Influential Board of Directors 2020

Business Publications Corporation

Pacesetter in Healthy Development 2019

Campaign for Grade-Level Reading

Brightspot in School Readiness 2019

Campaign for Grade-Level Reading

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of central Iowa high school students who graduate from high school within 5 years.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: Iowa Department of Education, 5 year graduation rate for 20 school districts in Polk, Dallas, and Warren counties

Percent of central Iowans who are financially self-sufficient.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adults

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: American Community Survey, 5 year estimates, 2011-2015, Self-sufficient is defined as earning 250% of poverty or greater

Percent of Students that are Chronically Absent: Central Iowa

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

source: Iowa Department of Education

Percent without a High School Diploma: Central Iowa

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey 5-year estimates

Infant Mortality Rate: (Deaths per 1000 Live Births: Central Iowa)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Source: Iowa Department of Public Health

Kindergarten Readiness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: Iowa Department of Education

Percent Who Are Food Insecure-Central Iowa

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: Feeding America

Percent of central Iowa Households Who Spend 30% or More of Household Income on Housing Costs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 5-year estimates

Percent of central Iowans that Have at Least One Personal Healthcare Provider.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

Percent of central Iowans Who Report Having Good to Excellent Overall Health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

United Way of Central Iowa Community Impact

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

source: CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For each of the 5 Elements of a Thriving Community, we have identified a dashboard of metrics and measures from our community we’re using as key indicators of success. These will be used to set goals, measure impact, and track our progress over time.

As we focus on results, the goals set will be well-defined and measurable so our community can clearly see the real and apparent impact of the work they generously support. In the past, for each area of work (education, income, and health) one metric was used to measure progress and represent impact. Moving forward, we will track and report multiple key indicators for each element.

Volunteer advisors and subject matter experts have helped identify these key indicators and are now using them to guide the United Way of Central Iowa team to develop specific goals and strategies for each element. Visit our website to learn about the key indicators for each Element.

United Way of Central Iowa focuses on the following strategies to move our community forward in the 5 Elements of a Thriving Community.

ESSENTIAL NEEDS:
-Increase availability of and reduce barriers to accessing healthy food for central Iowans with limited resources and access
-Provide supports needed to keep people in affordable, stable, and healthy homes
-Increase opportunities for safe, health-promoting spaces where central Iowans live, work, and play

EARLY CHILDHOOD SUCCESS:
-Address barriers to prenatal care and improve birth outcomes
-Increase access to and availability to prevention, early identification, and early intervention services for children birth-5 years to promote healthy physical and mental development
-Increase access to and participation of children in a quality childcare or preschool settings that promote kindergarten readiness
-Advocacy: Policies and practices to improve Early Childhood systems and provide equitable access to central Iowans

EDUCATION SUCCESS:
-Improve student success in elementary, middle, and high school
-Increase access to quality, culturally relevant, and engaging activities/programs to promote learning, positive social emotional wellness and reduce school absences for student K-12
-Promote successful transitions from middle and high school
-Increase student access to career exploration, activities, and awareness
-Increase high school students who graduate with a plan for the future
Advocacy: Policies and practices to improve Education systems and provide equitable access to central Iowa youth

ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY:
-Provide access to skills and supports leading to jobs that provide income needed to be self-sufficient with the opportunity to build wealth
-Provide access to adult basic education, post-secondary education, training, and supports required for quality jobs
-Provide individuals access to financial services and supports to manage their money, save for assets, and purchase/invest in assets - including developing, financing and sustaining small business.
-Maximize use of the tax code to boost income through appropriate filing status and use of tax credits and deductions
Advocacy: Policies and practices to improve Economic Opportunity systems and provide equitable access to central Iowans

HEALTH & WELL-BEING:
-Reduce barriers to accessing regular, quality, culturally appropriate physical and mental health care (g. stigma, language, trust, cost, proximity, availability of workforce)
-Promote and support central Iowans’ sense of purpose, belonging, and connectedness.
Advocacy: Policies and practices to improve Health and Well-Being systems and provide equitable access to central Iowans

United Way of Central Iowa has funded programs in central Iowa for more than 100 years. In 2008, United Way moved to a community impact model of bringing together partners across many sectors and working toward large-scale community change. At that time central Iowa adopted three broad community goals for Education, Income, and Health. Under these goals, strategies were identified for achieving reaching them. The same will be done under our new UNITED to THRIVE strategic focus as we strive to meet our goals and key indicators of success.

Volunteer experts make decisions about programs to fund under the strategies within each of our five areas of focus. United Way requires that all of the programs it funds report outcomes. United Way has a data team, individuals who work with funded programs to help with tracking client outcomes and with measuring program results. All programs funded by United Way report program outcomes on a regular basis and they then meet with a funding cabinet made up of volunteer leaders to make investment decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

In addition to the progress made toward the Community Goals for 2020, United way of Central Iowa has received more than $300M in cumulative giving since 2008.
EDUCATION
In 2019, the 5-year graduation rate for central Iowa students was 93.6% with the goal of 95% by 2020, which means 6,300 more students have graduated than would have if the rate had stayed at the 2008 level of 83.4%. Results in United Way's 2021 Community Report Card show: 30,332 vision screenings leading to 3,670 students receiving two free pairs of glasses through Vision to Learn since 2017; 9.9% increase in the graduation rate for students of color between 2011-2019; 133,304 students participated in out-of-school activities supporting their development since 2010

INCOME
In 2019, 68% of central Iowans are financially self-sufficient, as defined as earning at 250% of poverty or more, with a goal of 75% by 2020, which means 63,979 more people are financially self-sufficient than in 2010. Results in United Way's 2021 Community Report Card show: 40% of United Way's Bridges to Success program graduates have increased their income by 45% or more since the program launched in 2016; $86,501,478 in federal and state refunds were issued through United Way's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program since 2008; United Way led efforts to eliminate the childcare "cliff effect" and increase access to quality and affordable childcare; 71,415 individuals received legal services to remove barriers to self-sufficiency since 2011

HEALTH
Gallup did not complete the surveys to determine the Health and Well-Being Index score in 2019 or 2020. United Way continued to measure metrics within Gallup's Five Factors of Well-Being to create innovative solutions to the most pervasive challenges within this focus area. Results in United Way's 2021 Community Report Card show: 19,583,644 pounds of food were distributed through pantries, food rescue, community gardens, and corporate giving gardens since 2010; 54.6% of central Iowans consumed 5+ servings of fruits and vegetables 4+ days per week in 2018, which improved from 53.7% in 2014; 28,272 individuals/families received emergency shelter, supportive, or stable housing since 2010

COVID-19
Thanks to contributions from donors, volunteers, and incredible partnerships, United Way nimbly and decisively responded to COVID-19, creating new resources to address the new and urgent needs of our community. We invested $1.8M for COVID-19 relief (in addition to the $22.2M investment distributed into the community this fiscal year ending June 30,2021. We rallied local organizations to centralize volunteer opportunities in a special COVID-19 section of our Central Iowa Volunteer Hub. We established means for nonprofit leaders to share how the pandemic was impacting them directly with community, state, and federal leaders. We distributed 73,728 rolls of toilet paper across the state through Share-a-Square. We also provided access to vaccinations and vaccination appointments

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

United Way of Central Iowa
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.88

Average of 4.03 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.6

Average of 3.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 21% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

United Way of Central Iowa

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

United Way of Central Iowa

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

United Way of Central Iowa

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of United Way of Central Iowa’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $934,314 $2,016,658 $1,910,157 $3,081,057 -$3,359,519
As % of expenses 3.2% 6.7% 6.2% 10.0% -11.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $825,230 $1,898,612 $1,759,926 $2,937,977 -$3,486,505
As % of expenses 2.8% 6.3% 5.7% 9.5% -12.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $29,799,965 $29,792,003 $32,989,395 $30,163,758 $26,442,012
Total revenue, % change over prior year 6.5% 0.0% 10.7% -8.6% -12.3%
Program services revenue 1.4% 1.4% 1.3% 2.0% 1.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.5% 0.7% 0.8% 0.4% 0.3%
Government grants 2.2% 3.7% 4.5% 8.6% 3.1%
All other grants and contributions 96.2% 94.6% 93.9% 89.3% 95.6%
Other revenue -0.2% -0.4% -0.5% -0.3% -0.9%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $29,204,011 $29,892,651 $30,965,753 $30,683,013 $28,383,413
Total expenses, % change over prior year 2.4% 2.4% 3.6% -0.9% -7.5%
Personnel 18.0% 18.6% 18.4% 19.1% 20.6%
Professional fees 1.1% 4.2% 3.6% 4.8% 3.0%
Occupancy 0.7% 0.7% 0.7% 0.7% 0.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 75.4% 70.9% 72.5% 70.7% 70.2%
All other expenses 4.8% 5.7% 4.9% 4.7% 5.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $29,313,095 $30,010,697 $31,115,984 $30,826,093 $28,510,399
One month of savings $2,433,668 $2,491,054 $2,580,479 $2,556,918 $2,365,284
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $602,200 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $417,588 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $31,746,763 $32,919,339 $33,696,463 $33,985,211 $30,875,683

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.0 2.6 4.8 4.5 2.6
Months of cash and investments 5.3 5.6 6.5 6.6 6.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.0 8.4 9.1 10.1 9.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $7,234,362 $6,578,895 $12,466,846 $11,619,040 $6,094,799
Investments $5,575,814 $7,490,839 $4,177,944 $5,164,395 $9,461,535
Receivables $10,773,007 $9,239,074 $9,267,168 $7,289,787 $6,699,934
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $9,421,117 $9,157,754 $9,423,920 $9,639,364 $9,367,905
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 74.2% 70.2% 71.5% 73.0% 77.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 8.7% 9.4% 10.6% 7.5% 8.5%
Unrestricted net assets $21,879,909 $23,778,521 $25,538,447 $28,476,424 $24,989,919
Temporarily restricted net assets $9,411,256 $7,552,018 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $3,383,213 $3,547,025 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $12,794,469 $11,099,043 $11,003,496 $10,290,709 $9,292,313
Total net assets $34,674,378 $34,877,564 $36,541,943 $38,767,133 $34,282,232

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Ms. Mary Sellers

Mary Sellers was named President in July 2021, a role she also held from 2012 to 2017. During the interim period of 2017 to 2019, Sellers served as U.S. President of United Way Worldwide, leading the U.S. network of 1,200 local United Ways. Mary was also accountable for $3.5 billion in fundraising revenue annually, as well as the strategic impact of United Ways in 41 countries and territories. For 10 years prior to her leadership of United Way, Mary was the president and CEO of the Science Center of Iowa, where she guided the planning, fundraising, execution, and operation of the $62M, 110,000-square-foot facility in downtown Des Moines. Mary earned her B.A. from the University of Florida and her M.B.A. at the University of Iowa, Tippie School of Management. She is also a graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute, the Strategic Perspectives in Nonprofit Management program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business, and the Diversity Leaders Initiative at Furman University.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

United Way of Central Iowa

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

United Way of Central Iowa

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

United Way of Central Iowa

Board of directors
as of 01/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Maria Volante

Volante Consulting

Term: 2023 -

Rob Barron

Iowa & Minnesota Campus Compact

Wendy Batchelder

Salesforce

Anant Bhalla

American Equity

Kristi Burma

Athene

Dr. Alexis Campbell

Iowa State University

Dr. Tony Coleman

Broadlawns Medical Center

John Currier

F&G

Abby Delaney

Bankers Trust

Rosalind Fox

John Deere Des Moines Works

Jem Gong-Browne

Principal Financial

Phil Hall

Wells Fargo Corp.

Christine Holmes

Ernst & Young

Laura Howe

Wells Fargo

Erica Jensen

Dotdash Meredith

Tanner Krause

Kum & Go, LC.

Colin Pennycooke

Principal Financial

Drew Porter

Corteva Agriscience, DowDuPont

Nancy Post

Community Volunteer

Renee Schaaf

Community Volunteer

Jeremy Staun

Nationwide Insurance

Chris Terhark

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Brent VanderWaal

ITA Group, Inc

Mike Wegner

MercyOne System

Paster Jonathan Whitfield

Corinthian Baptist Church

Janice Lane-Schroeder

Children &Families of Iowa

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/2/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.