PLATINUM2024

Kidsave International Inc

Forever families for all kids, everywhere

aka Kidsave   |   Culver City, CA   |  http://www.kidsave.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Kidsave International Inc

EIN: 91-1887623


Mission

Kidsave's mission is to ensure that no orphan or child in foster care is forgotten and that every child grows up in a family, or with a connection to a stable adult, with love and hope for a successful future.

Ruling year info

1999

CEO and President

Ms. Randi E. Thompson

Main address

200 Corporate Pointe, Suite 325

Culver City, CA 90230 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1887623

Subject area info

Human rights

Adoption

Youth services

Population served info

Children

Adolescents

Family relationships

At-risk youth

Children and youth

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Adoption (P31)

International Human Rights (Q70)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Older youth in foster care want the same things most kids want: healthy, loving, and supportive relationships. They want to have their basic needs met, so they can focus on school and preparing for their future. Youth in foster care often don’t get to have the lives that most kids have. They don’t get the help they need with schoolwork, preparing for employment, accessing health care, continuing education, or housing and living arrangements. Youth who age out of foster care are less likely to have a high school diploma or GED, or to be employed within the first 18 months after exiting care. Without employment or housing, many wind up incarcerated or in need of public assistance. Most entered the foster care system because of violence, neglect and emotional and/or sexual abuse in their home of origin.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Weekend Miracles Program

Kidsave’s Weekend Miracles program enables older children ages 9 to 17 in U.S. foster care to meet and get to know caring, stable adults and families who might mentor or adopt them. We recruit adults to adopt and mentor foster youth through three volunteer roles: host families, mentors and advocates.

Families and individuals can:
1. Host a child for weekends and be that child’s partner in finding a family
2. Advocate for a specific child through their circles of friends, to help that child find an adoptive family, and/or
3. Mentor a child by providing educational and enriching experiences and personal support.

With the help of its partners, Kidsave helps place older foster youth in permanent homes where they are loved, supported, and can grow into sucessful adults.

This program operates in Los Angeles, CA and Houston, TX.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents

Kidsave’s Summer Miracles program brings older orphaned children ages 8 to15 from Colombia -- where they are considered unadoptable due to their age -- to stay with host families in the US for three- or five-week visits. U.S. hosts are either considering adoption or have decided to advocate to find a permanent family for the child or children they host.

Host families give the youth a rich cultural experience; they often attend camp and do many things they have never had the opportunity to do before. But more importantly, their host families advocate for them, reaching out to their circles of friends to find families interested in adoption.

Summer Miracles continues, year after year, to see success, finding adoptive families for approximately 80% of children who travel in the program. As a result, the Colombian government has fully embraced Kidsave’s Family Visit Model as its primary recruitment strategy for adoptable children over the age of eight.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive parents
Foster and adoptive children

Since 2016, Kidsave has been deeply involved in reforming Ukraine’s overburdened child welfare system. With over 100,000 children languishing in institutions, orphanages, and boarding schools across Ukraine, Kidsave stepped in to change the outcome for these kids. Our ongoing programs help older orphans and children reunite with family, find adoptive Ukrainian families, or successfully transition into independent living.

Through our Family Mentoring Program, we help move children out of crowded institutions and back into families. For youth about to age out of care, our Corporate Mentoring Program, Pathways to Success, is a lifeline to career readiness and successful independent living.

We are proud to say these innovative programs continue to operate, despite the current war, with our ongoing commitment to change the lives of children in Ukraine for the better.

Population(s) Served
Foster and adoptive children
Foster and adoptive parents

Kidsave works in Sierra Leone to help children affected by Ebola who have lost their parents find families. The number of children without parents skyrocketed during the Ebola Crisis. Kidsave helps those children find families. While Ebola has slipped from the headlines, the needs of these Ebola orphans and the need to find them homes remain urgent.

Kidsave’s approach to reunification starts by identifying children living in institutions that can, and will be supportive of the children moving back home. Social workers identify friends/relatives so that children and "kin" can be reunited. Kidsave’s partner then engages social workers to visit the families and children on a regular basis to address any problems, and they work to keep the placement stable. The neediest families can participate in a microloan program and an agricultural lending program.

Population(s) Served
Children
Adolescents
Families of origin

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of foster youth matched in a lifelong connection with an adult/family

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Weekend Miracles Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of hosts recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Weekend Miracles Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hosts make a commitment of building a relationship with a foster youth for a minimum of one year at least two times a month.

Percentage of Summer Miracles youth who made connections with families and are moving forward with adoption

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Summer Miracles Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teens served through our Pathways to Success mentoring program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Ukraine Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people receiving foster care child protection training in Sierra Leone

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sierra Leone Family Reunification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Kidsave works to help older children -- who have been removed from their familial home and cannot be safely returned to biological parents or kin -- find adoptive families and lasting connections with caring adult mentors. We accomplish this by increasing the visibility of these children and providing opportunities for them to meet and get to know interested adults in the community.

Our primary goals are twofold:

1. Develop a permanent connection for older youth in foster care: Children and youth in foster care who have at least one caring adult in their lives have significantly better life outcomes than those who do not, especially youth with similar cultural backgrounds. One caring adult involved in the life of a vulnerable child can change communities for the better, including decreased rates of incarceration, teen pregnancy, and drug use, as well as increased high school graduation rates.

2. Advocate for change in how older foster youth develop relationships with caring adults. Kidsave is at the forefront of creating systemic change in child welfare systems. We have changed the way child welfare systems identify adoptive families for older youth by advocating for these youth to have a say in who adopts them and/or provides them with a stable adult connection. Our programs are structured to encourage youth and adults/families to meet and get to know each other as individuals in a youth-oriented, relaxed environment. Regular visits, hosting, and mentoring relationships work together to break down barriers and change perceptions between older youth and interested adults, and ultimately allow relationships to grow organically. Everywhere our programs are implemented, we have changed not only adult perceptions about foster youth, but also the possibilities of what older foster care youth can achieve.


Kidsave programs and services provide older youth in out-of-home care with opportunities to establish sustainable relationships with adults and families who will help them thrive in the future. We help older children -- who have been removed from their familial home and cannot be safely returned to biological parents or kin -- find adoptive families and lasting connections with caring adult mentors.

The foundation for Kidsave’s programs is the Family Visit Model, which is built on three components:
1. Child Specific Advocacy: Advocacy for a child is central to the Family Visit Model. It is essential to get the word out in the community about a child’s need for permanency and encourage people to meet these children.
2. Events: Events provide opportunities for these children to meet prospective Hosts, mentors, and adoptive families in a safe and fun environment. Event activities include cooking, arts& crafts, bowling, and much more.
3. Hosting/Mentoring: Hosting or mentoring provides a child who needs permanency with the opportunity to experience family life and build relationships with caring adults. These volunteers become the child’s advocate and support him or her in daily life and work to help that child meet people who might adopt or commit to a long-term relationship with the child. Hosts and mentors introduce the child to their family, friends, and colleagues.

The following additional components support the effectiveness of our work:
A. Child Preparation: Preparation is essential for a child’s success in the program. Youth interested in participating in one of Kidsave’s program first learn about the benefits of participating, and why a connection to a stable adult is valuable and can positively impact their lives. Preparation can include an orientation or workshops which is facilitated by a professional.
B. Training and Support: Training is essential to helping prospective Host families and mentors learn about how and why these children entered the child welfare system, and how this trauma, loss, and grief impacts these children’s lives. Additionally, Hosts and mentors learn how they can best support the children through advocacy and time spent together.
C. Recruitment and Outreach: Communication through social media and other means is important to build awareness about the ways the local community can get involved to support children in need of permanent families and lasting connections. We focus on building partnerships to expand our networks, and offer frequent opportunities to engage community members to attend events, meet children, and become a Host, mentor, or adoptive family.

By creating opportunities for youth to connect with adults, Kidsave’s family visit model is the catalyst that leads to legal permanency or lasting connections with caring adults. In turn, these relationships create the stability, guidance, and nurturing that help these otherwise forgotten children build a solid foundation for a healthy future.

For more than 20 years, Kidsave has developed and managed innovative programs that create change in the way governments and child welfare professionals advocate for permanency for older youth.

Kidsave created the Family Visit Model, which combines best practices in social work and social marketing to create connections for older orphans and foster youth with caring adults. This unique approach to finding permanency for older youth gives adults opportunities to meet and establish lasting bonds with youth who are available for adoption or need a permanent connection to a caring adult. These visits frequently result in adoption, legal guardianship, or lifelong mentor relationships.

Kidsave currently utilizes over 200 volunteers for its direct services programs and trains child welfare professionals worldwide to utilize this proven, innovative methodology. Since 1999 Kidsave has directly served over 15,000 children throughout the world.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

62.98

Average of 18.91 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.9

Average of 6.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

21%

Average of 21% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Kidsave International Inc

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Kidsave International Inc

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Kidsave International Inc

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Kidsave International Inc’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $73,634 $87,760 $671,877 $1,107,736 $472,230
As % of expenses 3.6% 5.6% 46.8% 57.3% 8.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $73,634 $87,760 $671,877 $1,107,736 $472,230
As % of expenses 3.6% 5.6% 46.8% 57.3% 8.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,145,808 $1,583,174 $2,106,687 $2,836,208 $7,391,900
Total revenue, % change over prior year 2.6% -26.2% 33.1% 34.6% 160.6%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.5% 1.7%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.5%
Government grants 0.0% 1.6% 3.3% 16.2% 0.5%
All other grants and contributions 97.8% 98.1% 96.3% 78.3% 97.0%
Other revenue 2.2% 0.2% 0.3% 0.0% 0.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,065,369 $1,574,852 $1,435,203 $1,931,998 $5,651,583
Total expenses, % change over prior year 14.0% -23.7% -8.9% 34.6% 192.5%
Personnel 45.9% 67.3% 63.4% 63.0% 29.2%
Professional fees 20.5% 17.8% 16.2% 14.8% 11.6%
Occupancy 4.3% 4.1% 5.7% 4.2% 1.5%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.4% 0.0%
Pass-through 3.0% 2.7% 4.7% 3.0% 2.2%
All other expenses 26.3% 8.1% 9.7% 14.6% 55.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,065,369 $1,574,852 $1,435,203 $1,931,998 $5,651,583
One month of savings $172,114 $131,238 $119,600 $161,000 $470,965
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $150,000 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,237,483 $1,706,090 $1,554,803 $2,242,998 $6,122,548

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.9 5.8 14.7 15.2 8.9
Months of cash and investments 4.3 6.2 14.7 15.2 8.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.7 4.2 10.2 14.5 5.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $675,916 $760,212 $1,755,607 $2,440,218 $4,198,843
Investments $60,197 $51,665 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $401,723 $313,959 $487,653 $319,015 $277,669
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $10,585 $10,585 $10,585 $10,585 $10,585
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 9.2% 8.1% 18.0% 1.3% 1.5%
Unrestricted net assets $459,311 $547,071 $1,218,948 $2,326,684 $2,798,914
Temporarily restricted net assets $592,003 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $592,003 $516,408 $645,825 $442,299 $1,710,386
Total net assets $1,051,314 $1,063,479 $1,864,773 $2,768,983 $4,509,300

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO and President

Ms. Randi E. Thompson

The organization is managed by Randi Thompson, CEO/Executive Director and President. She is a marketing professional with adopted children who saw a problem and seeks to create dramatic social change using her business expertise. Ms. Thompson is a marketing communications specialist with over 30 years of direct experience in developing outcome-based marketing and communications projects designed to effect social change, including 10 years in Russia and Eurasia.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Kidsave International Inc

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Kidsave International Inc

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Kidsave International Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/05/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Joni Noel

RGP

Term: 2012 - 2024


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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/2/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/11/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.