PLATINUM2024

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Think Differently! Then Act!

aka Assistance Dogs for Achieving Independence, a program of The Ability Center   |   Sylvania, OH   |  www.abilitycenter.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

EIN: 34-4428597


Mission

Together, we will work to make our community the most disability friendly in the nation by increasing independence for people with disabilities, discovering true passions, and changing the community's perception of disability.

Ruling year info

1952

Executive Director

Stuart James

Main address

5605 Monroe St

Sylvania, OH 43560 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Toledo Society for the Handicapped

Agility Angels

EIN

34-4428597

Subject area info

Disabled persons' rights

Special population support

Population served info

Families

Caregivers

People with disabilities

People with diseases and illnesses

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Advocacy Program

Serving Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Henry, Fulton, Defiance, and Williams County OH. Our advocacy staff works at local, state and federal levels to promote positive change for people with disabilities. The advocacy team works with people with disabilities on grassroots level to influence social change. The Ability Center engages with other disability groups to improve public policy.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses

Serving Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Defiance, Henry, Fulton and Williams County, OH. Training and placing service dogs, therapy dogs and school facility dogs to support people with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses

Serving 7 counties of NW Ohio: Lucas, Wood, Fulton, Henry, Defiance, Williams and Ottawa County, OH. Dog Agility is a sport, training dogs and participating in competitions, working with dogs and their owners using the sport of dog agility. The Ability Center Agility Dogs team is open to all individuals and capabilities, and also serves to help individuals diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder. The program helps develop social skills, physical abilities and self-confidence.

Population(s) Served
Students
Children and youth
People with other disabilities
Adults

Serving 7 counties of NW Ohio: Ensuring that people with disabilities have opportunities to achieve higher education is critical. In partnership with our auxiliary, we provide college scholarships to area students with disabilities.

For scholarship consideration, you must meet all eligibility requirements.

Applications are due by March 31.

Population(s) Served

Provides individuals with disability-related equipment in Northwest Ohio 13 counties: Williams, Fulton, Lucas, Ottawa, Defiance, Henry, Wood, Sandusky, Paulding, Putnam, Allen, Hancock & Seneca County.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses

Our programs serving Northwest Ohio support people with disabilities to live independently in the community of their choosing. Information and Referral services offer consultation on disability-related topics. Through our referral network, we can connect you to other agencies to ensure your need is addressed. Topics include but not limited to: Accessibility, Community Resources, Housing, Long-term Benefits, Assistance Dogs, Support Services and Transportation.

Population(s) Served

Serving Northwest Ohio, our in-person programming has virtual options available. Interactive programs include employability training, life skills training and recreation such as Career Mentorship, Independent Living Workships, and Recreation Outings. We have programs for children, teens/young adults, and adults.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Awards

Torch Award Finalist 2022

BBB

Torch Award for Ethics Winner 2023

BBB

The Doris Brennan Award - Innovative Work in Independent Living 2023

Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Active School Facility Dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Assistance Dogs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of service dogs trained and placed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Assistance Dogs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Agility Dog Sports

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

New program of ACT 2022. Added a second day of weekly classes in 2023.

Number of individuals receiving Home Accessibility improvements (ramps, handrails, grab bars) to aid in independent living.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Department

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of Ramps installed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Department

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of Assistive Technology/Durable Medical Equipment items Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Department

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Launched new Navigator Department 2023, centralized services, leading to 52% increase in items distributed.

Number of individuals receiving Assistive Technology or Durable Medical Equipment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Department

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independent Living Department

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Active Youth Consumers

Number of books distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Living NW Ohio

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

72 schools, 2 libraries receive the set of 13 DREAM books (Disability Representation, Education, and Awareness in Media). New 2022 initiative.

Advocacy Projects Completed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Access(42%), Health(20%), Housing(17%), Transport(15%), Support(6%). 21 workgroups. 11 investigations & surveys, 11 tech assist, 9 ordinance, 7 legis partic, 6 training, 2 legal enforce, 2 brochures.

Number of referrals to resources offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Living NW Ohio

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2022 top 6: 916 Home Mods, 509 Community Support, 328 Assistance Dogs, 243 Assistive Tech, 196 Housing, 127 IL Skills training

Number of rural outreach connections

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Living NW Ohio

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of the organization are to make Northwest Ohio the most disability friendly in the nation by using Advocacy, Home Accessibility Programs, Durable Medical Equipment, Assistive Technology, Assistance Dogs, School Facility Dogs and Emotional Support Dogs, Education and Recreation for children, youth and adults, site assessments and recommendations, along with raising awareness through Disability Awareness Experiences, 68 Words Podcast, Authentic Authors Series, and working with our partners within the community to make this happen.

In 2020, the Ability Center started a campaign to make NW Ohio the most disability-friendly community in the nation. While we will continue to address physical accommodations, our focus will be on the invisible barriers that prevent PWDs from fully integrating into society.
In July, 2022 we launched the “Think Differently, then ACT!” campaign, which features several new media efforts designed to raise society’s expectations of those with disabilities and that those with disabilities have of themselves. We want people in our community to realize that PWDs are doctors and lawyers and that we are employees, employers, parents, and consumers.
Additionally, we plan to launch an interactive Disability Awareness Experience (DAE) that will aim to create an association with the word disability that is positive and to “normalize” disability for those who participate. Participants will have a chance to play with wheelchairs, white canes, and other assistive technology
while getting to know a wide variety of people with disabilities. In many cases, it may be the first-time participants have interacted with someone blind, deaf, or using a wheelchair.
We will work to build community and make working with the agency easier by adding new front-line staff, “Navigators,” that will be a one-stop entry point to services. The ACT Navigators will intake clients and organize support across all the agency’s programs. In addition, they will work with clients to ensure they are taking full advantage of ACT support services.
Moving into the coming three-year cycle, we will look to increase client participation across all our supports and services. We’ve set ambitious goals - 28 service dogs by 2024, doubling our home modification outcomes, new youth programming focused on socialization through recreation, and a push to better serve the rural communities.
Our advocacy team will continue to work towards significant policy changes. For example, we are currently putting effort towards ensuring PWDs are not discriminated against in custody cases, increasing wages for direct care workers, and making public government meetings accessible through live streaming.
A new Director of Operations will be added to oversee the HAP and DME programs as well as the new navigators, facilities and rural operations. This position will provide clear, cohesive operations across these areas to work and organize efforts together moving forward with coordinated structure and leadership.
Lastly, we are looking to add structure to our development efforts. A Development Director will be added to oversee high net worth individuals, major gifts and estate planning. Additionally, they will oversee targeted grant procurement and reduce our dependance on the S.O. in the future. This position will also create new revenue lines by commercializing our innovative programming. We are currently doing an extensive review of our existing donor database for donors who may have the ability to commit more considerable

The Ability Center has over 100 years of experience serving and empowering the independent living model. We are have conducted research of our community determine the needs of the community, identify the gaps, and plan to fill those gaps. We have the capability to find the correct people for the positions needed to accomplish this task, and have a plan for fundraising to play for the plans. We have a strategic plan in place and individual and department goals and evaluations are aligned with this plan. Quarterly evaluations identify accomplishments and assist with adjusting plans accordingly to stay on track for meeting our objectives by the end of 2023.

As of February 2023, we have already launched our educational campaign "Think Differently, Then ACT!", and revamped our website, launched our new podcast, 68 Words and our Authentic Authors Series. The Ability Center is now offering our Disability Awareness Experience to organizations and groups in our community on a steady basis, as well as Lunch & Learn educational opportunities for the public to learn more about our programs.
We have our new Navigator department in place, along with their separate entrance for public assistance walk-in services.

We have a new Rural Independent Living Manager, a new Development Director working on fundraising and targeted grant opportunities, a new Operations Director overseeing HAP and DME, and have brought whelping and other vet services in-house to increase the number of trained service dogs available.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30
Financial documents
2023 ACT 990 9-30-2-23 2022 ACT 990 9.30.2022 2021 The Ability Center 2021 990 signed and approved
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.03

Average of 8.78 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3

Average of 3.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

27%

Average of 28% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $926,757 $981,406 $1,657,550 -$837,123 $19,496
As % of expenses 22.5% 23.5% 35.3% -15.6% 0.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $818,943 $831,085 $1,494,791 -$996,503 -$169,871
As % of expenses 19.4% 19.2% 30.8% -18.0% -2.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $4,547,339 $5,447,431 $5,213,194 $5,439,230 $5,543,654
Total revenue, % change over prior year -4.6% 19.8% -4.3% 4.3% 1.9%
Program services revenue 1.1% 0.7% 0.8% 1.0% 1.9%
Membership dues 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1% 0.1%
Investment income 3.6% 3.8% 4.2% 6.5% 3.9%
Government grants 16.7% 14.1% 26.4% 19.1% 16.3%
All other grants and contributions 78.1% 82.6% 64.7% 76.9% 76.1%
Other revenue 0.5% -1.2% 3.8% -3.5% 1.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $4,112,159 $4,170,137 $4,689,163 $5,371,473 $5,613,044
Total expenses, % change over prior year 1.9% 1.4% 12.4% 14.6% 4.5%
Personnel 66.9% 69.4% 64.1% 60.4% 65.5%
Professional fees 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Occupancy 4.0% 3.7% 3.3% 3.1% 4.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 1.3% 0.8% 2.7% 8.0% 3.1%
All other expenses 27.7% 26.0% 29.8% 28.4% 27.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $4,219,973 $4,320,458 $4,851,922 $5,530,853 $5,802,411
One month of savings $342,680 $347,511 $390,764 $447,623 $467,754
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $1,562,509 $435,277 $201,191 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $4,562,653 $6,230,478 $5,677,963 $6,179,667 $6,270,165

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 3.0 5.2 4.4 4.2 3.0
Months of cash and investments 15.1 17.4 17.1 12.5 11.6
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 16.4 14.5 16.0 11.7 10.9
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $1,031,444 $1,821,778 $1,719,928 $1,861,596 $1,390,691
Investments $4,154,178 $4,207,822 $4,964,240 $3,718,969 $4,013,101
Receivables $148,787 $166,391 $283,737 $383,281 $535,571
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,905,936 $5,468,444 $5,875,116 $5,800,953 $5,918,830
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 65.7% 49.7% 48.5% 47.2% 48.6%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 10.0% 10.6% 6.4% 8.1% 7.7%
Unrestricted net assets $6,967,892 $7,798,977 $9,293,768 $8,297,265 $8,127,394
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $984,315 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $984,315 $1,452,495 $1,057,079 $796,847 $975,879
Total net assets $7,952,207 $9,251,472 $10,350,847 $9,094,112 $9,103,273

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Stuart James

Stuart came to the independent living movement seven years ago as Executive Director of the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley (TheCIL). During his 7 year tenure, he renewed TheCIL’s commitment and overall vision for what a truly inclusive world would be like, nearly tripling the organization’s endowment. TheCIL adopted the “Be Your Own Normal” slogan and reorganized their services, communications, and operating philosophy around an idea that “normal” is everyone; we all possess talents, skills, qualities, and responsibilities that contribute to our community. Stuart led the organization in developing and updating programs, including an expanded AT program, new Lifestyles events, a life-changing Residential Access program, and the evolution of TheCIL’s Youth programs. Prior to his tenure at TheCIL, Stuart spent more than twenty years as an executive in the sports and entertainment industry, living and working across four continents.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO

Board of directors
as of 04/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Mark Stutler

Healthcare Provider Solutions

Term: 2024 - 2025


Board co-chair

Adrienne Bell

First Solar

Term: 2024 - 2025

Adrienne Bell

First Solar

Jeremy Bigelow

Advocate

Susan Conda

Community Volunteer

Crystal Harris Darnell

Lucas County Commissioners

Lisa Keller

Retired

Deborah M. Krohn

University of Toledo

Chris Riling

Cisco

Jennifer Schaefer

University of Toledo Foundation

Alice Schorling

Community Volunteer

Tenesha Ulrich

United Spinal

Arlene Whelan

Auxiliary President

Kerry Wolff

A-Gas

Nathan Turner

Advocate

Renee Wood

Advocate

William Logie

Retired

Mark Stutler

Healthcare Provider Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser