PLATINUM2023

HUNGER FIGHT

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Jacksonville, FL   |  www.hungerfight.org
GuideStar Charity Check

HUNGER FIGHT

EIN: 46-1338834


Mission

Hunger Fight provides donors, advocates and volunteers the vehicle necessary to end hunger and illiteracy through the provision of nutritious meals to children, seniors, and families in need and age-appropriate books to preschoolers by engaging communities and mobilizing partners. With 21 collaborative partners in 15 counties of North Florida and South Georgia, Hunger Fight serves over 10,200 elementary children with nutritious meals every weekend and over 3,500 preschoolers with age-appropriate books every month.

Notes from the nonprofit

It should be noted that every community in the United States has food insecurity and illiteracy problems therefore, when we packages meals and books in and for your community those meals and books STAY in your community.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder, Executive Director

Mrs. Sherri Porter

Main address

2935 Dawn Rd.

Jacksonville, FL 32207 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-1338834

Subject area info

Early childhood education

Food aid

Population served info

Children and youth

Ethnic and racial groups

Immigrants and migrants

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Remedial Reading, Reading Encouragement (B92)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger Fight's emphasis is on childhood hunger and illiteracy through our Food for their Bellies; Books for Their Brains umbrella program. This program includes our "Feed the Backpack" program which provides weekend nutrition to children on the Federal Free and Reduced Meal Plan (Title 1) who, while fed during the week, may face an entire weekend, 65 hours, without food. It also includes our "Feed the Need to Read" program, an early literacy program which focuses on emergent literacy skills of children ages 0-5. While these are our primary programs, Hunger Fight also works collaboratively with local organizations to provide meals for seniors who live in poverty. We are also a FEMA partner and provide meals during times of disaster.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Feed The Backpack Initiative

Hunger Fight’s Feed the Backpacks and community hunger programs. Our Feed the Backpacks program provides weekend nutrition to children who are enrolled in the Federal Free and Reduced Meal Plan at school. Our four-serving, nutritionally balanced, great tasting, stand-alone meals provide the vitamins and nutrients necessary for a child to return to school ready to learn. Our community feeding programs provide meal packs to seniors and community programs that serve those at risk for hunger. Collaborative partnerships help to distribute the food where and when needed. The cost of the meal packs is only one dollar ($1.20), $.30 per serving. If you want to help feed hungry children, families and seniors in need, please DONATE NOW!

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

Hunger Fight is working to address the literacy challenges our children face. Literacy skills begin at birth and build on relationships and experiences that occur during infancy and early childhood. Emergent literacy has the biggest impact on the academic success of a child and is the root of reading success and forms the basis for learning in all subjects.

90% of a child’s critical brain development occurs by age 5. Children who receive high quality education by age five are 70% more likely to graduate from high school. Achievement gaps between children in poverty and those from more affluent families become apparent by 18 months. When children start behind, they rarely catch up. But when children are read to from an early age, they become better readers and students. Early reading experiences provide opportunities to build vocabulary and literacy rich environments that support development of pre-reading and cognitive skills that ensure children are prepared for success in school and in life.

The Feed the Need to Read literacy program focuses on emergent literacy skills by delivering free books to preschool children each quarter. The Feed the Need to Read program is serving children across Central and Northeast Florida.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

This program is the umbrella program for both the feeding and literacy program for Hunger Fight. Our two-pronged approach is designed to help children living in poverty by providing weekend nutrition to help with focus, behavior and academic issues and books for children ages 0-5 to promote early literacy skills that begin at birth.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of attendees present at rallies/events

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Seniors, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, we hosted over 65 packing events, including our annual Thanksgiving Community Outreach and private convention events. Attendance and participation at our events continue to grow each year.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We host packing events, large and small, across North Florida & South Georgia and special events across the country for children in need.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We had tens of thousands of volunteers come out and support us at our packing events in which we packaged and distributed over 3 million meals to local elementary schools in the counties we serve.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We were overjoyed to acquire OVER 200 new donors throughout the year 2022. This was achieved through our community outreach, grants and collaborations with other organizations and our idream campaign.

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through added focus on our grant-making efforts, Hunger Fight added 9 new grantors to our donor list in 2022.

Number of external speaking requests for members of the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hunger Fight representatives are requested to speak at different businesses and schools concerning our Feed the Backpack and Feed the Need to Read Initiatives.

Number of websites and organizations (outside of our organization) that share our resources and information

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide our meals FREE of charge to 18 area backpack programs, food pantries, and programs thus reducing their expenses. These nonprofits become our logistical arm.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children, Adolescents, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We enjoyed over 22124 volunteers who each gave 2.5 hours of their time at our packing events.

Number of volunteer management professionals trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Food for Their Bellies; Books for Their Brains

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Feed the Need to Read

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We delivered 73,719 books to 0 - 5 year-olds in low-income areas.

Number of children receiving meals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, At-risk youth

Related Program

Feed The Backpack Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We delivered over 2 million meals to title one students and over 1.8 million meals to food banks and other feeding organizations

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Hunger Fight is bringing awareness to and combating the issues of food insecurity, hunger and illiteracy in our local communities. We accomplish this by hosting packing events utilizing thousands of volunteers from the community to package nutritious meals which are then distributed to hungry children and families every weekend. Businesses, civic organizations and individuals to come together as one to make a significant difference in their local community.

The organizational goals fulfill our mission: to end hunger and illiteracy through the provision of nutritious meals and books to children, seniors and families in need by informing, engaging and mobilizing communities and partners. Hunger Fight has developed a two-pronged approach to help children and families in need: a literacy program for children ages birth to age 5 and a nutrition program for school-age children. Hunger Fight strongly believes that every child should be well fed and well read, and it is our hope that these programs will provide a foundation on which to build. Our goals to help seniors at risk for hunger is to continue to expand our footprint by working collaboratively with other organizations to provide meals for distribution to seniors living in low income areas who are at risk for hunger.

Included in our strategic plan is the continued growth and expansion of our Backpack programming through the partnerships with our community, corporations and volunteers who support our mission. In addition, we have partnered with the Dolly Parton Imagination Library for a literacy program addressing emergent literacy skills in children ages 0-5. Through our on-going packing events, these programs are supported and expanded into new communities where the need is greatest. We continue to raise awareness to the issue of food insecurity, hunger and illiteracy through guest speaking, participation in community events, through our social media outlets and various public relations outlets.

Hunger Fight is different from other food organizations. We are more than a food bank or distribution source as we 1) produce and pack our own specially formulated, vitamin enrich meals for distribution; 2) through our partnership with Imagination Library, we provide books to address emergency literacy skills in children ages 0-5 through the provision of monthly books, 3) Hunger Fight is a Salvation Army Disaster Relief Partner and FEMA approved agency providing emergency meals in times of disaster; 4) our collaboration with other community programs sends meals to food pantries, food banks and missions feeding families, children, adults and seniors living in low income neighborhoods; 5) we offer scalable meal packing event programming to meet needs of sponsoring organizations; 6) collaborative approach with schools and key community programs for year-round food distribution.

2020 was a year of growth and expansion for Hunger Fight as our Hunger Fight Feed the Backpack program added new schools and our Feed the Need to Read program expanded to 42 zip codes. To date we have packed 10,866,386 meals were packed at 74 events utilizing 7,850 volunteers and 125,000 meals were sent for Covid relief.
This growth was largely a result of the change in our overall business strategy and revised business model developed by our Board of Directors. After reviewing our first three years of business, we realized our initial outlook and scattershot approach to distribution wasn’t producing the outcome we had envisioned. We reassessed our overall approach with research and discussions with our Board, sponsors and constituents. Based on that exercise, we strategically decided to shift our focus to those who cannot change independently their circumstances, namely children and seniors.
Going forward, Hunger Fight will continue to expand its services to additional schools and zip codes where services are needed. This will be accomplished through new partnerships and collaborative efforts within our community and with corporations, businesses and volunteers who believe in our mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.40

Average of 0.96 over 9 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.4

Average of 1.6 over 9 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12%

Average of 7% over 9 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

HUNGER FIGHT

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HUNGER FIGHT

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HUNGER FIGHT

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of HUNGER FIGHT’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$164,112 $110,822 -$59,022 $67,627 $458,326
As % of expenses -22.7% 13.8% -4.7% 5.5% 25.9%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$173,588 $93,267 -$67,075 $48,213 $415,929
As % of expenses -23.7% 11.4% -5.3% 3.9% 22.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $774,445 $898,682 $1,205,009 $1,373,269 $2,195,453
Total revenue, % change over prior year -2.1% 16.0% 34.1% 14.0% 59.9%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 100.0% 93.8% 80.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 6.2% 19.6%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $722,622 $802,388 $1,264,031 $1,232,642 $1,771,433
Total expenses, % change over prior year 27.4% 11.0% 57.5% -2.5% 43.7%
Personnel 43.4% 37.3% 37.1% 41.3% 34.9%
Professional fees 1.2% 1.2% 0.4% 0.5% 7.1%
Occupancy 12.0% 0.0% 6.9% 7.3% 4.9%
Interest 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 0.8% 0.7%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 43.3% 61.3% 55.5% 50.0% 52.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $732,098 $819,943 $1,272,084 $1,252,056 $1,813,830
One month of savings $60,219 $66,866 $105,336 $102,720 $147,619
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $32,658
Fixed asset additions $0 $47,196 $17,418 $0 $367,219
Total full costs (estimated) $792,317 $934,005 $1,394,838 $1,354,776 $2,361,326

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.8 2.5 2.4 3.3 2.4
Months of cash and investments 0.8 2.5 2.4 3.3 2.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.8 2.6 1.2 0.8 1.3
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $48,104 $164,502 $255,747 $341,718 $355,715
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $15,367 $34,400 $4,715 $69,247 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $109,965 $157,135 $184,134 $177,789 $554,483
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 24.5% 28.3% 28.5% 44.1% 23.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 26.0% 32.8% 54.9% 54.6% 30.5%
Unrestricted net assets $190,684 $283,951 $192,057 $179,660 $511,100
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $92,101 $68,620
Total net assets $190,684 $283,951 $192,057 $271,761 $579,720

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Founder, Executive Director

Mrs. Sherri Porter

Prior to co-founding Hunger Fight, Mrs. Porter worked for over 25 years in marketing and public relations, owning several small businesses in those fields. She has also worked for, volunteered for and served as a member of the Board of Directors for numerous non-profit organizations over the past two decades, gaining valuable experience in the nonprofit sector.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

HUNGER FIGHT

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

HUNGER FIGHT

Board of directors
as of 03/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mrs. Christine League

Nathan Dowd

Southern Smoke BBQ

Gayle Curry

Curry CPA

Christine League

Hiday & Ricke Law Firm

Ben Glynn

Monumental Realty

Michael Brown

MLXL Productions

Dr. Sam Santelices

North Florida Pediatrics

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/02/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.