PLATINUM2023

Harbor Hope Center

Breaking the cycle of homelessness among Washington's youth.

GIG HARBOR, WA   |  http://www.harborhopecenter.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Harbor Hope Center

EIN: 82-4495774


Mission

Harbor Hope Center is dedicated to improving the lives of young adults ages 18-21 experiencing homelessness in the Gig Harbor and Key Peninsula area and throughout Washington. We provide safe overnight shelter for up to 90-120 days, food, access to medical care, case management, 1 to 1 mentoring, life skills training, and transportation. We support young adults as they move away from traumatic pasts and work diligently to create an independent and successful future for themselves.

Ruling year info

2019

Board President

Mr. Jeffrey Katke

Executive Director

Daniel E Johnson

Main address

3781 Rosedale St. P.O. Box 2291

GIG HARBOR, WA 98335 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

82-4495774

Subject area info

Youth mentoring

Self-advocacy

Aging out of foster care

Housing for the homeless

Transitional living

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Young adults

Homeless people

At-risk youth

Victims of crime and abuse

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Harbor Hope Center provides overnight shelter, food, transportation, case management, 1 to 1 mentoring and life skills training to assist young adults experiencing homelessness to realize independence and permanent housing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Provide-a-Home Program

Harbor Hope Center provides overnight shelter to young adults 18-21 experiencing homelessness for 90-120 days as they work toward permanent housing solutions. Each resident is provided food, clothing, transportation and a 1 to 1 mentor to develop an individualized plan for success. They also work through Life Skills training and develop resources for employment and housing searches.

We have a host home program that supports youth under 18 who are homeless to reunite with family or realize a safe and permanent housing situation to complete school and become successful adults.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth
Young adults
Victims of crime and abuse

Dedicated and trained 1 to 1 mentors are matched with every resident upon entry. They work with residents to develop individualized plans for success with achievable steps that can be accomplished in 90 days. Mentors provide support, build trust with the resident and help them to expand their social and professional networks that will be with them long after they exit our program. Mentors meet weekly with mentees and adjust their approach depending on the needs of the mentee. Mentors are asked to make a one-year commitment in order to follow up with residents as they move into their new independent lives to check in and support at least three times post exit.

Harbor Hope Center is expanding to provide prevention through mentoring working with middle and high school students with high risk factors that can lead to dropping out of school and becoming homeless in the future. Mentors are also trusted supporters to assist youth with troubling family/home situations.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth
Young adults
Victims of crime and abuse

Transportation is one of the biggest issues faced by young adults experiencing homelessness. Harbor Hope Center is located in an area that has minimal public transportation. Harbor Hope Center Resident Advisor staff provide transportation to health appointments, job interviews, housing searches, to educational and job training resource centers, and to social/support locations where residents can find community and build relationships.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Young adults
At-risk youth
Victims of crime and abuse

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 12% of the population of Pierce County lives in poverty. It is estimated that nearly 7% of school-age children in the Peninsula School District live in poverty. For many of these children, buying clothing is a financial burden. Clothing donations can be made directly to Harbor Hope Center, Gig Harbor Peninsula FISH Food Bank, and Community Services. Harbor Care Center will also pick up donations. Additionally, a grant from the Kiwanis Club of Gig Harbor and their Kiwanis Cares for Kids Program, provides an allotted amount for clothing per youth.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth
Young adults
Victims of crime and abuse

According to Northwestharvest.org, the State of Washington is ranked as 25th hungriest state in the US. In 2016, one in eight Washingtonians did not get enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs. Nearly one in nine Washingtonians lived below the poverty level. One in five kids in Washington State lives in a household that struggles to put food on the table. One in seven Washingtonians relies on SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps). Half of all people on SNAP are kids. One in six Washingtonians relies on their local food bank.

It is a little-known fact that about 20 percent of the students in the Gig Harbor Peninsula School District (1,674 kids at last count) qualify for free or reduced-price meals. Although these children receive breakfast and lunches while school is in session, they may go hungry during the summer.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Young adults
At-risk youth
Victims of crime and abuse

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Young adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Provide-a-Home Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The average length of stay for a resident is 90 days with possible extensions to 120 days. We have two care homes with 6 beds in each home. We have the capacity to serve 48 young adults per year.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Young adults, At-risk youth

Related Program

Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Breaking the cycle of youth homelessness in Washington.

Overnight care homes for 90-120 days for healing and mentoring to build resilience and secure permanent housing that can serve up 48 residents per year.

Host homes for youth under 18 who are experiencing homelessness.

Case Management to ensure necessary and appropriate medical and mental health care and connection to housing and employment resources.

Individualized Mentoring to build resilience and form important relationships for successful employment and a healthy future.

Life Skills training to learn skills that were not taught to them that are necessary for successful adulthood.

Housing searches and financial literacy skills to save and plan for permanent housing.

Post-exit follow-up for at least one year to provide support and encouragement.

Harbor Hope Center's Board and staff bring a variety of backgrounds, special training and lived experiences and are dedicated and called to serve the community we provide care to.

We have two care homes that have the capacity to serve 48 residents per year that are staffed 24/7 by trained and experienced Resident Advisors. We have developed a Life Skills program designed to be tailored to each individual and able to be worked through during the 90 days they are with us. Every resident is provided with a mentor upon entry who works with the individual to design a person-specific plan for success. They then meet at least once per week working through challenges and staying on track to meet their goals.

We are a small organization and that allows our staff to have regular meetings with each other and our Executive Director to ensure employee success as well.

We have a number of training programs for our staff to support their confidence in their service in areas such as trauma informed care, mindfulness, inclusion and the importance of self-care.

We have main office staff providing in-house data gathering and reporting, document management, hiring and onboarding of new employees, and intake for new residents.

We have built strong reciprocal relationships with area organizations, schools and agencies with similar missions.

Over four years, we have served 140 residents in our care homes and host homes. We have seen the need for our services increase 860% since we began our program. We have become known in the community and are the only provider of our services in western Pierce County (Gig Harbor and Key Peninsula) making it possible for our neighbors experiencing homelessness to remain in their community as they heal and grow.

In 2023 we have expanded our professional staff to include a Mentor Coordinator to expand our Mentor program into the community as a prevention method to assist at-risk middle and high school students so that they will be able to change their path away from homelessness and poverty toward successful futures. We are partnering with area schools for referrals and the local YMCA for outreach and training and mentoring facilities that will allow for program delivery outside of school hours.

We have two new youth advisors working with us on community outreach projects and major fundraising efforts.

We have been conducting a needs assessment for expansion to a Transitional Housing - Rapid Rehousing program that would allow our care home residents who need more time to establish their independence in a low-rent or rent assisted model where they could work and save for permanent housing for 12-18 months longer. We are seeking grant support for this project for 2024.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Harbor Hope Center
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.34

Average of 7.46 over 4 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.3

Average of 3.1 over 4 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 3% over 4 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Harbor Hope Center

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Harbor Hope Center

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Harbor Hope Center

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Harbor Hope Center’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $324,739 $65,647 $340,909 $46,613
As % of expenses 193.9% 20.3% 59.6% 6.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $315,648 $55,269 $322,719 $25,162
As % of expenses 178.8% 16.5% 54.7% 3.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $233,488 $389,800 $913,022 $769,639
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 66.9% 134.2% -15.7%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $167,483 $324,153 $571,965 $723,026
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 93.5% 76.4% 26.4%
Personnel 58.7% 75.3% 83.6% 78.6%
Professional fees 0.9% 4.2% 2.5% 1.7%
Occupancy 0.9% 4.9% 1.0% 0.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 39.4% 15.6% 12.8% 18.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $176,574 $334,531 $590,155 $744,477
One month of savings $13,957 $27,013 $47,664 $60,252
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $250,000 $37,514 $419,000 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $440,531 $399,058 $1,056,819 $804,729

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 6.2 4.3 0.6 1.3
Months of cash and investments 6.2 4.3 0.6 1.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.4 3.8 0.5 1.2
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $86,917 $117,006 $29,648 $81,021
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $250,000 $287,514 $706,514 $706,514
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 3.6% 6.8% 5.3% 8.4%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.7% 3.7% 0.7% 1.3%
Unrestricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $315,648 $370,917 $693,636 $718,798

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Board President

Mr. Jeffrey Katke

Jeffrey was founder and CEO of Metagenics Inc., a nutrigenomics and lifestyle medicine company, from 1983 to 2010. Under his leadership, the company expanded internationally with manufacturing and distribution facilities in 46 countries. During Jeff’s tenure, Metagenics employed over 1,000 people and offered over 1,200 products to more than 75,000 healthcare providers and millions of consumers. In 2009, Jeffrey sold Metagenics. He is an investor in Kindex Therapeutics, a biotech spin-off from Metagenics, and serves on that company’s board of directors. In 2010 Mr. Katke founded Katke Holdings LLC to make private equity investments in early stage growth businesses. Through Katke Holdings LLC, Jeffrey is one of the principals of Avistone LLC, a commercial real estate investment company, Intefusion LLC, a medical insurance billing company, and JCK Designs LLC, a residential real estate investment company. Mr. Katke serves as Chairman for each company and provides management consulting.

Executive Director

Daniel Johnson

Daniel attended Northwest University in Seattle and graduated from North Central University in Minneapolis, MN with a bachelor’s degree in Pastoral Studies. After college he founded a youth drop-in center in Tacoma, Washington then served as an associate pastor, executive pastor and then founding pastor of a non-denominational church. He also created Next Leadership Association to train and mentor emerging leaders. In 2015, he helped establish a home for at-risk girls. Daniel has written dozens of articles and posts as well as editing and ghostwriting several books on topics as diverse as habit formation and the brain to an autobiography. He has spoken over 800 times on topics ranging from spirituality to culture and leadership. He has helped form several organizations and currently consults in the areas of PR, marketing & branding, nonprofits, fundraising and business development.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Harbor Hope Center

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Harbor Hope Center

Board of directors
as of 09/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Jeffrey Katke

Metagenics

Term: 2019 -

Deanna Keller

Commissioner, Port of Tacoma

Dennis Brown

Program Manager for Homeless Veterans at Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

Gino Grunberbg

Lead Pastor, Harbor Christian Center

Judy Hart

Certified Public Accountant

Manuela Schwab

Investment Professional

Jesse Young

Former Washington State Representative, 26th District

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/5/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/21/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.