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Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Together we can end human trafficking.

aka LCHT   |   Denver, CO   |  www.combathumantrafficking.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

EIN: 27-0662292


Mission

To inform social change that eliminates human exploitation. Together we can end human trafficking.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Amanda Finger

Main address

1031 33rd St. Suite #237

Denver, CO 80205 USA

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Formerly known as

Polaris Project Colorado

EIN

27-0662292

Subject area info

Public health

Crime prevention

Abuse prevention

Leadership development

Human rights

Show more subject areas

Population served info

LGBTQ people

Women and girls

Indigenous peoples

Immigrants and migrants

Economically disadvantaged people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Victims' Services (P62)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Organized responses to human trafficking in Colorado are relatively new and the Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking (LCHT) has become a leader in this effort since 2005. Human trafficking is one of the most egregious violations of human rights. Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to induce labor or sexual exploitation. Research estimates that there are over 40 million human trafficking victims globally today and likely hundreds of thousands in the United States (www.polarisproject.org). But, because of its covert nature, this crime often goes unnoticed or misunderstood in the US, leaving an untold number of victims without the help they desperately need. This is true in the state of Colorado as well, where the fact that there are concealed victims of human trafficking in our communities is largely unknown.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research and Action

The goal of our Research and Action Program is to contribute data-driven insights to the broader anti-trafficking movement and advance a comprehensive response.

LCHT knows the importance of rigorous research to gain a comprehensive understanding of human trafficking issues specific to Colorado and has been at the helm of multiple studies. The data derived from these research projects have been used to better identify the populations most at-risk of trafficking, the major types and methods of trafficking, geographical hotspots for exploitation, and the gaps in statewide enforcement efforts and victims’ services. Our Colorado Project research has not only created statewide action plans but also informed state human trafficking policy.

Population(s) Served
Academics
Activists

The goal of LCHT Training and Education Program is to deliver anti-trafficking training to targeted professional groups and diverse community audiences across Colorado.

Education is one of the most effective means to prevent exploitation and is the key to strengthening the anti-trafficking movement. LCHT educates and trains people who are in a position to identify, intervene, and aid victims of trafficking. These include first responders, law enforcement, social service providers, shelter workers, health care workers, child welfare/foster care workers, schools and youth organizations, Court-Appointed Special Advocates, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners, emergency room/public health clinic staff, and mental health professionals. Trainings advocate for the safe, supportive, and sensitive care of victims/survivors and vulnerable populations.

Population(s) Served
Emergency responders
Students

The goal of our Leadership Development Program is to prepare human rights leaders and survivors with the knowledge, skills, and professional development opportunities necessary to contribute to the anti-trafficking movement.

Through our Leadership Development program, LCHT empowers individuals to become leaders in anti-trafficking organizations or similar work. Since 2005, we've supported more than 200 interns in becoming human rights leaders through traditional academic internships and non-traditional community-based internships. We seek to equip interns with a leadership framework and skills that they can bring to their community, career, and the anti-trafficking movement.

Population(s) Served
Students
Activists

The goal of our Hotline and Resource Directory Program is to increase access to services for individuals experiencing trafficking and develop community-based agencies across Colorado as they address human exploitation.

Colorado’s 24/7 Human Trafficking Hotline can be reached by phone or text and is a survivor-informed, trauma-informed, anonymous, and safe resource for survivors and community members to find support services in relation to human trafficking. The Hotline’s resource directory includes hundreds of localized agencies that provide a variety of support services for survivors of human trafficking including case management, survivorship resources, and legal support. Colorado’s Human Trafficking Hotline gives every survivor a place to turn and fosters hope and empowerment for individuals experiencing exploitation.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Emergency responders
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants
Sex workers

Where we work

Awards

Top Nonprofits 2018

GreatNonprofits

Top Nonprofits 2019

GreatNonprofits

Top Nonprofits 2020

GreatNonprofits

Top Nonprofits 2021

GreatNonprofits

Top Nonprofits 2022

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Top Nonprofits 2023

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Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Training and Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of unique training presentations delivered by LCHT staff

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Training and Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Attendance at LCHT education presentations and trainings

Number of research studies conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research and Action

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of completed community-based research reports written + available for dissemination

Number of publications identifying sector best practices

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research and Action

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of external publications using data from LCHT research in peer reviewed journals or edited books

Number of interns who complete the Leadership Development Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Leadership Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of interns who complete LCHT's Leadership Development Program

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hotline and Resource Directory

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of incoming calls + texts that are received by a hotline advocate

Number of new agencies added to the Hotline Resource Directory

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hotline and Resource Directory

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of unique agencies who are listed in the Hotline Resource Directory for the first time

Number of active volunteer hotline advocates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hotline and Resource Directory

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Unique number of people who volunteer at least 4 shifts annually for the hotline

Percentage of trainees who report being knowledgeable about the crime of human trafficking by the end of the presentations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Training and Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys administered at professional + community trainings. Target is greater than 80%.

Percentage of professional trainees who report feeling comfortable identifying red flags of human trafficking, and the appropriate steps to take if they suspect trafficking by the end of a training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Training and Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys administered at professional trainings. Target is greater than 80%.

Percentage of Leadership Development Program participants who demonstrate increased knowledge about the crime of human trafficking

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Leadership Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys taken by program participants. Target is greater than 90%.

Percentage of Leadership Development Program participants who demonstrate an increased knowledge about human rights

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Leadership Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys taken by program participants. Target is greater than 90%.

Percentage of Leadership Development Program participants who report an increase in personal leadership skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Leadership Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys taken by program participants. Target is greater than 90%.

Percentage of Leadership Development Program participants who report an increased capacity to influence change in the anti-trafficking movement

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Leadership Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Reported as a percentage and calculated from pre/post surveys taken by program participants. Target is greater than 90%.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to conduct research that contributes data-driven insights to the anti-trafficking movement and advances a comprehensive response. We identify promising practices and areas for improvement from survivors, practitioners, and researchers, gathering insights that can foster partnerships and identify critical opportunities for the anti-trafficking movement.

We aim to equip human rights leaders and survivors with the knowledge, skills, and professional development opportunities necessary to elevate their voices within the anti-trafficking movement. We recognize that the lived experiences of survivor leaders position them as powerful change agents who can lead the field forward.

We aim to equip professional groups and diverse community audiences across Colorado with the knowledge to better understand, recognize, and react to instances of human trafficking. Through education that is survivor-informed, we believe that we can activate the community, creating more widespread support for the anti-trafficking movement. An informed and activated community is necessary for any comprehensive solution to meaningfully impact human exploitation.

We aim to host a hotline that increases access to services for individuals experiencing trafficking. For each person we are able to connect to a resource, we chip away at the trauma human exploitation causes. In developing, maintaining, and improving the resources available through the hotline, we also strengthen the network of community-based agencies across Colorado as they address human exploitation.

We are driven by a vision to end human trafficking, a severe form of exploitation. We hold the belief that social change - community-led, bottom-up solutions - is the pathway to eliminating human exploitation.

But what kind of social change would it really take to end human exploitation? While we know there is no single solution, we also recognize that nobody has the answer yet. LCHT employs the best possible methods that we know of right now to work towards eliminating human exploitation, and to continually ask - and answer - this question of ‘what would it really take.’ In other words, we are both working towards the solution and helping figure out what that means along the way; we drive social change through our programs, and simultaneously use our programs to better understand how to achieve the social conditions that would eliminate human exploitation. In this way we operate as a laboratory for collaboratively bringing ideas together to move towards solutions.

Human trafficking is a complex issue for which there is no single root cause. Complex issues require comprehensive solutions that mobilize a broad range of sectors and methods. LCHT believes those solutions lie in our communities, including formal and informal networks defined by geography, identity, and social connections.

In 2005, our organization formed as a state chapter of the Polaris Project, a nationally recognized organization. With the support of a small group of dedicated volunteers, we enhanced local anti­ trafficking efforts by raising public awareness and facilitating professional trainings. In 2009, in order to establish our work at the forefront of Colorado's anti-­trafficking movement, we transitioned to an independent 501(c)3 called the Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking. We deliberately chose to describe ourselves as a laboratory to reflect our understanding of the need to incorporate a mix of ideas, with input from multiple sectors, to adequately understand and address the problem. Since our founding, we have built a strong network of partners, supporters, and leaders to amplify our capacity and impact. We are a recognized leader in anti-trafficking with established public support, an active Board of Directors, and a developed staff with the experience and skills to advance the mission.

Since 2005, LCHT has trained over 55,000 professionals and community members to recognize and appropriately intervene in human trafficking situations, we have conducted three major research projects to drive action and inform policy, we have assumed administration of Colorado's 24/7 human trafficking hotline / textline, and we have developed 200 future human rights leaders. For 15 years, LCHT has advanced a data-informed approach to anti-trafficking by completing major research projects that have provided valuable data regarding the problem of human trafficking in Colorado and beyond.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

32.12

Average of -686.67 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18.8

Average of 9.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 13% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $19,930 $139,991 $75,092 $111,795 $446,454
As % of expenses 7.7% 38.5% 15.0% 21.1% 56.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $19,930 $139,991 $75,092 $109,077 $440,863
As % of expenses 7.7% 38.5% 15.0% 20.5% 55.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $277,818 $492,368 $577,976 $635,310 $1,262,684
Total revenue, % change over prior year 31.7% 77.2% 17.4% 9.9% 0.0%
Program services revenue 0.3% 2.8% 2.0% 0.4% 0.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.2% 0.5% 0.4% 0.7%
Government grants 4.0% 7.5% 16.9% 11.3% 13.3%
All other grants and contributions 95.9% 89.4% 80.6% 87.9% 85.5%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $258,888 $363,957 $499,847 $528,709 $789,686
Total expenses, % change over prior year 34.5% 40.6% 37.3% 5.8% 0.0%
Personnel 73.1% 72.8% 70.7% 76.1% 64.0%
Professional fees 2.3% 3.3% 3.3% 3.6% 4.8%
Occupancy 4.4% 3.2% 3.2% 2.8% 1.8%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.4%
All other expenses 20.1% 20.6% 22.8% 17.5% 29.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $258,888 $363,957 $499,847 $531,427 $795,277
One month of savings $21,574 $30,330 $41,654 $44,059 $65,807
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $5,290 $9,816 $18,070
Total full costs (estimated) $280,462 $394,287 $546,791 $585,302 $879,154

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Months of cash 8.2 8.8 7.9 9.9 18.8
Months of cash and investments 8.2 8.8 7.9 9.9 18.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 8.3 10.7 9.4 11.2 17.8
Balance sheet composition info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Cash $176,925 $266,746 $329,316 $434,050 $1,237,832
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $115,452 $28,978 $132,269 $88,183
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $5,290 $15,106 $43,186
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 18.0% 30.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 3.4% 3.2% 4.5% 2.7%
Unrestricted net assets $0 $323,204 $398,296 $507,373 $1,203,197
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $48,407 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $48,407 $51,444 $46,250 $165,501
Total net assets $178,465 $371,611 $449,740 $553,623 $1,368,698

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2017 2018 2019 2020 2022
Material data errors No No Yes No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Amanda Finger

Amanda Finger has worked on anti-trafficking in Colorado since 2005. She received a Master’s of Arts in International Human Rights from the Josef Korbel School for International Studies at the University of Denver. Her professional background includes women’s health advocacy in Washington DC, field organizing for Congressional and Senate campaigns in Maryland and Colorado, and work as a legislative aide at the Colorado State Legislature. In addition, she conducted field research in South Africa on human trafficking to complete her thesis, “Sex Trafficking and Barriers to Health: A Case Study in South Africa.” Amanda served two years as an Adjunct Professor with the Institute for Women’s Studies and Services at MSU Denver, teaching Human Trafficking and Women’s Health courses. She was appointed in 2014 to the Governor’s Colorado Human Trafficking Council, co-chairing the Data & Research Task Force and serving as a member on the Training Standards & Curriculum Task Force.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking

Board of directors
as of 02/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Julie Laser

Jo Solonika

Clarivate

Allison Nipert

Allison Nipert Communications

Julie Anne Laser-Maira

University of Denver

Patricia Alvarez Valverde

CU Anschutz

Arnold Hanuman

Colorado District Attorneys’ Council

Devin Pitts-Rogers

CapTech Consulting

Daniel Trznadel

United States Marshall Service (Retired)

Rachel Hartgen

CARE USA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/27/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.