PLATINUM2023

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Plant the Future!

aka Philadelphia Orchard Project   |   Philadelphia, PA   |  www.phillyorchards.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Philadelphia Orchard Project

EIN: 26-1075823


Mission

The Philadelphia Orchard Project plants and supports community orchards in Philadelphia. Community organizations own, maintain, and harvest the orchards, expanding community-based food production and outdoor spaces. POP provides our partners with orchard design assistance, plant materials and supervision, training in orchard care, and volunteer recruitment.

Ruling year info

2010

Co-Executive Director

Phil Forsyth

Co-Executive Director

Kim Jordan

Main address

4000 Woodland Ave, c/o The Woodlands 4000 Woodland Avenue

Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-1075823

Subject area info

Agriculture, fishing and forestry

Community and economic development

Gardening

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Garden Club, Horticultural Programs (C42)

Management & Technical Assistance (K02)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Orchard Planting & Support

The Philadelphia Orchard Project now supports a total of 68 orchards in the city of Philadelphia, across 24 zip codes. In 2023, new orchards were planted with Get Fresh Daily and West Philly Peace Park. Including additional expansion plantings at existing orchard partner sites, a total of 43 new fruit & nut trees, 128 berry bushes & vines, and 1,266 perennials & groundcovers were planted in 2023.

A total of 231 orchard plantings, trainings and work days were carried out in 2023. We are proud to have involved nearly 800 volunteers and 2,387 total participants in planting, caring for, and celebrating community orchards at POP events last year. At the POP Learning Orchard, 2,335 lbs of produce was harvest for donation to mutual aid efforts. Community partners reported harvesting at least 6,264 lbs of fruit from their orchards, which was distributed to neighbors, used in programs, or sold at low-cast farmstands.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Adults

Our POPHarvest program expanded access to fresh fruit by educating the public and harvesting and distributing fruit that would have otherwise gone to waste. In 2023, 10 POPHarvest events were held across the city, involving 70 volunteers and sharing information about the harvest and use of abundant but overlooked city fruits. Fruit picked at these harvest events included juneberries, mulberries, aronia (chokeberry), crabapples, and Asian pears, with harvests totaling at least 275 pounds. This program offers great educational value through introducing city residents to abundant fruits available all around them.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

POP has continued to increase the depth and breadth of our educational programming, with over 500 participants attending 34 in-person and online workshops and orchard tours, on topics including ecological orchard care, organic pest and disease management, and mushroom cultivation. In 2023, POP offered its 4-part ecological orchardist certification course for partners, volunteers, and the general public, welcoming 82 participants to 4 online and 2 in-person sessions. Hundreds more have watched training videos, including a 10-part pruning series, on POP's YouTube channel.

Past efforts include: Pest & Disease Scouting Guides; bilingual Rainbow Nutrition & Recipe Cards; a Community Organizing Toolkit; and dozens of plant information sheets, blot posts, and other educational resources for orchard care which are published on POP's website.

Population(s) Served

The goals of the Lead Orchard Volunteer (LOV) program are two-fold: to provide additional direct support to POP community orchards across the city, and to expand opportunities for deeper engagement and training for POP volunteers based on one of POPs core values of learning. The LOV program expand the hands-on training and support services that POP provides, which community partners report to us year after year is what they value the most from POP's team. Many communities already have dedicated volunteers who put in many hours to improve their neighborhoods for free. A needs-based stipend offers recognition and support of the time, energy, knowledge, and skills these leaders contribute to their local orchards and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Spanning across one acre at the historic Woodlands Cemetery in West Philadelphia, the Learning Orchard contains a diverse variety of plant life including 90 fruit and nut trees and over 150 berry bushes, shrubs, and fruiting vines. The evolving landscape witnessed transformative moments throughout the season, shaped by the care of POP staff, Lead Orchard Volunteers and some favorable weather conditions.

With milder winter temperatures and the absence of late freezes in 2023, the orchard experienced an unprecedented bounty. Beloved stone fruits, such as peaches and cherries, made their debut at the orchard with their inaugural harvests.

Read our detailed 2023 Learning Orchard update here: https://www.phillyorchards.org/2023/12/08/pop-learning-orchard-2023-season-summary/

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes workshop participants and outreach events such as open houses and harvest festivals.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This number includes hands-on and online orchard care workshops led by POP staff, and orchard harvest & use workshops led by POP staff and community educators.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Orchard Planting & Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Orchard Planting & Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2022, POP planted 39 fruit & nut trees, 244 berries & vines, and 1,310 perennials & groundcovers together with our community partners.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Education/Learning: POP aims to build a knowledge-base and culture of orcharding and fruit growing that connects diverse communities in Philadelphia.

Justice: POP is positioned at the intersection of Philadelphia's burgeoning food and environmental justice movements, particularly in our focus on serving low-wealth communities.

Permanence: POP plants orchards with partners who share our long-term commitment to communities to create and care for an environmental infrastructure that will endure.

Regeneration: Moving beyond sustainability, POP seeks to regenerate the health of communities, the fertility of the land, and the overall environmental balance throughout Philadelphia.

Beauty: Orchard bring beauty as well as bounty to urban spaces. Orchards embody fundamental cultural yearnings to repair the earth, and with it, its people.

POP works to advance the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger (End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture). Through planting community orchards with perennial food-producing plants, and engaging city residents in caring for these green spaces and using the harvests, we aim to make more healthful food available in cities and to promote sustainable methods for growing it. We provide hands-on support and training in ecological orchard care, and support a variety of educational programs focused on the use and care of orchard plants. The accessibility to POP-supported orchards and produce, and educational opportunities for all Philadelphians -- especially historically disadvantaged groups -- increases the understanding of urban agriculture and just food systems. Normalization of sustainable, community-owned urban food sources contributes to the larger culture shift of urban sustainability and food justice.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Philadelphia Orchard Project
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

3.87

Average of 22.89 over 8 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.5

Average of 9 over 8 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 9% over 8 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Philadelphia Orchard Project’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $45,915 $64,484 $16,495 $97,801 $55,001
As % of expenses 21.6% 25.5% 5.7% 26.9% 12.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $45,915 $64,484 $14,345 $94,144 $48,562
As % of expenses 21.6% 25.5% 4.9% 25.6% 10.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $293,414 $302,822 $348,801 $609,011 $395,683
Total revenue, % change over prior year 52.4% 3.2% 15.2% 74.6% -35.0%
Program services revenue 7.7% 5.5% 5.0% 3.8% 3.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.5% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 12.5%
All other grants and contributions 91.8% 93.6% 94.3% 95.5% 83.4%
Other revenue 0.5% 0.4% 0.7% 0.7% 1.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $213,027 $253,012 $289,434 $363,983 $448,254
Total expenses, % change over prior year 14.1% 18.8% 14.4% 25.8% 23.2%
Personnel 65.3% 72.8% 73.0% 68.8% 75.2%
Professional fees 6.1% 1.5% 2.8% 9.3% 4.9%
Occupancy 2.3% 1.7% 1.7% 1.3% 1.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 26.3% 24.0% 22.6% 20.6% 18.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $213,027 $253,012 $291,584 $367,640 $454,693
One month of savings $17,752 $21,084 $24,120 $30,332 $37,355
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $36,678 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $13,749 $7,536 $76,943
Total full costs (estimated) $230,779 $274,096 $329,453 $442,186 $568,991

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 10.5 13.2 11.3 11.4 7.5
Months of cash and investments 10.5 13.2 11.3 11.4 7.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 9.8 11.3 10.0 10.9 8.3
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $187,070 $277,759 $271,555 $345,750 $280,306
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $133,646 $120,111 $174,789 $305,521 $251,802
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $13,749 $21,285 $98,228
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 15.6% 27.3% 12.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.3% 8.7% 8.2% 0.8% 10.8%
Unrestricted net assets $173,693 $238,177 $252,522 $346,666 $395,228
Temporarily restricted net assets $139,967 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $139,967 $125,293 $168,165 $315,392 $207,820
Total net assets $313,660 $363,470 $420,687 $662,058 $603,048

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Co-Executive Director

Phil Forsyth

Phil has led POP's orchard design and development since the first plantings in the spring of 2007. As Co-Executive Director, he designs and plants orchards, coordinate volunteers, leads all programmatic activities, and oversee infrastructure improvements at the POP Learning Orchard. Phil has over eighteen years experience in urban farming, gardening, and landscaping. He hold a BS in Horticulture and Landscape Design from Colorado State University and a Certificate in Permaculture Design & Teaching from the Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute. Phil previously owned and operated an edible landscape design business in Philadelphia and also blogs on urban farming, edible landscaping, and food growing and has written articles for GRID, the Permaculture Activist, and Urban Farming magazine.

Co-Executive Director

Kim Jordan

Kim has been involved with POP since it was formed in 2007, first serving as a volunteer while in grad school, then as a Board member from 2009-2016. She joined POP's staff as Development Director in January 2019, and has served as Co-Executive Director since October 2019, helping POP grow its programs, staff, and impact. It was through planting and tending trees in community orchards across Philadelphia while meeting inspirational community groups and growers that she grew to love with the city and decided to call it home. Kim is a 2017 graduate of the Citizens Planning Institute, a member of the Riverwards Area Democrats, and since 2018 has served as a Democratic committee person in the 31st Ward. In 2023 she joined the Board of Directions of the Norris Square Neighborhood Project, and become an Eastern Regional Network fellow of the Environmental Leadership Program.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Philadelphia Orchard Project

Board of directors
as of 01/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Marci Green

New Jersey Pinelands Commission

Term: 2023 - 2025

Julie Ulrich

Nature Conservancy

Angelina Conti

University of Pennsylvania

Marci Green

New Jersey Pinelands Commission

Tony Dorman

Danny Keyes

PwC

Rose Cuozzo

Junior League of Philadelphia

Jena Annise Harris

Riverwards Produce

Craig Johnson

Interpret Green

Nate Kleinman

Experimental Farm Network

Loretta Lewis

Union Baptist Church

Maku Warrakah Ali

KenCCID

Elan Drennon

Comcast

Inella Ray

Children First

Andrew Figueiredo

Dechert LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/7/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/13/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.