PLATINUM2024

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

aka 59-3700304   |   Maitland, FL   |  flawildflowers.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

EIN: 59-3700304


Mission

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands native wildflower habitat corridors through education, research, conservation and planting.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Stacey Matrazzo

Main address

PO Box 941691

Maitland, FL 32794-1691 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Florida Wildflower Advisory Council

EIN

59-3700304

Subject area info

Natural resources

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The bees, butterflies and other insects we depend on for food and the health of the natural world rely on wildflowers. Yet wildflowers themselves are vanishing. Our organization works to bring wildflowers back to the landscape, both natural and built.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Native wildflower research

Our research program digs for information that creates change, preserves biodiversity and ensures a brighter natural future for us all. Current projects include a study that is collecting data on how weeds effect the successful establishment of wildflower pollinator habitat.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The education program increases awareness of native wildflower ecotourism while educating residents and visitors about wildflowers' environmental roles and their parts in Florida's history and culture. It increases knowledge of native wildflowers through publications and events and develops learning opportunities for children through elementary schools wildflower curricula.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Our planting program supports Florida's biodiversity and ecosystems by providing funds for projects on roadsides, in communities and in natural areas. It promotes the planting of native wildflowers in sustainable urban landscapes while providing information on management to landscape professionals and landscape architects. The program includes Viva Florida! grants, which provides $3,000 of funding to Florida botanical gardens, state parks, extension centers, public parks with which to establish and maintain wildflower demonstration gardens. It also include the popular Seedlings for Schools program, which has given wildflower garden grants to more than 1,100 elementary, middle and high schools throughout Florida. Our education program includes organizing grassroots volunteers to reduce roadside mowing of wildflowers in their respective counties.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Environmental Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Covid-19 pandemic put a temporary halt to field trips in March 2020. We are back to holding field trips in 2022. Currently, we aim for at least one field trip per month.

Number of rallies/events/conferences/lectures held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Environmental Education and Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of educational webinars held. Live webinars are attended by hundreds and are later streamed on our YouTube channel by hundreds more.

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020's average was skewed due to a large bequest that the Foundation received. The rest of the years were calculated using the Foundation's fiscal year, beginning October 1 and ending September 31.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Native wildflower planting and conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Shows total grants awarded rather than dollar amount since our Seedlings for Schools grants award flower seedlings rather than money. *SFS grants were postponed in FY 20-21 due to Covid-19.*

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Florida Wildflower Foundation protects, connects and expands wildflower habitat corridors through education, research, conservation and planting. Our goals are to: * Preserve and establish wildflowers. * Assist in forming state, county and municipality policies and procedures that keep roadside wildflowers flourishing. * Develop scientific understanding of weed competition during the establishment of wildflowers from seed. * Develop propagation methods for native milkweed in order to increase availability of the plant to Monarch butterflies. * Create awareness of wildflowers through public education programs,  publications, social media, events and campaigns that educate and urge people to take action. * Develop tomorrow’s conservationists and scientists through school curriculum and university student support. * Establish school teaching gardens and community demonstration gardens.

Research - Through the Gary Henry Endowment for the Study of Native Wildflowers, we provide financial annual support to a University of Florida graduate student researching native wildflowers. We also fund other research projects at the university. We also have established a four-year research project that is investigating methods of controlling weed in large-scale wildflower plantings.
Education and Outreach - We distribute hundreds of thousands of educational FWF brochures, magazines and handouts annually, and continue to develop other publications as needs arise. We are seeking and forming new partnerships with community organizations, state parks, state and national forests, utility companies and others in an effort to pursue larger, more effective projects.
Planting and Conservation - We have developed popular programs that provide grants for native wildflower demonstration landscapes and school teaching gardens. We continue to build our partnership with the Florida Department of Transportation and individual cities and counties to develop policies and procedures that keep roadside wildflowers flourishing.

The Florida Wildflower Foundation is the only organization in Florida working solely on behalf of the state's native wildflowers. Its board, committee members and 600 volunteers represent strong alliances that bring deep knowledge. Representation on our Board of Directors includes the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Florida Association of Native Nurseries, Florida Wildflower Plant & Seed Growers Association, Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, Florida Master Gardeners, Bok Tower Gardens and Walt Disney World horticulture. Through sponsored research, FWF maintains strong ties with the University of Florida, the Florida Museum of Natural History and the University of South Florida, allowing it to tap into a broad knowledge base. FWF also employs staff and consultants that bring expertise in ecology, horticulture, environmental studies, marketing and communications.

Research - A FWF-funded four-year research project studying how insects interact with urban landscapes has concluded, and results have been accepted for publishing in a a peer-reviewed journal. Data from a FWF-supported study is helping nurseries to grow milkweed that is safe for Monarch butterflies. Our research team is in the second of a four-year study on controlling weed seed banks when planting wildflowers.

Education and Outreach - A substantial "Wild About Wildflowers! Activity Guide" keyed to Florida education standards has been developed and distributed to third- and fourth-grade teachers, not only in Florida, but throughout the nation. Our awareness campaign in Florida’s Panhandle has resulted in the forming of a grassroots group called the Panhandle Wildflower Alliance made up of 600 volunteers. With guidance from a Florida Wildflower Foundation contractor, they work with their respective counties to identify roadside wildflower areas for special management. In 2018, we published 80,000 copies of the free 24-page "20 Easy-to-Grow Wildflowers" magazine for circulation throughout the state. The publication also is available online. The one-day Florida Wildflower & Garden Show in DeLand, which our organization helped to establish, is now in its 13th year and drew 11,000 people in 2018.

Planting and Conservation - In 2016, we worked with the Florida Department of Transportation to revise its wildflower policy to include naturally occurring roadside wildflowers and benefits to pollinators. More than 650 school gardens and large-scale demonstration landscapes have been established within the last decade. FWF also has taught roadside maintenance crews in four counties how to plant and manage roadside wildflowers. We have assisted 35 Florida counties and three Florida cities in working with FDOT through the adoption of resolutions to protect and preserve wildflowers along roadsides.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

41.68

Average of 39.87 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23.3

Average of 15.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2%

Average of 6% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $31,548 $49,678 $401,888 $7,807 $207,758
As % of expenses 9.8% 15.2% 102.2% 2.0% 46.8%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $31,548 $49,678 $401,888 $7,807 $207,558
As % of expenses 9.8% 15.2% 102.2% 2.0% 46.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $342,681 $367,729 $795,125 $528,033 $625,250
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.4% 7.3% 116.2% -33.6% 18.4%
Program services revenue 4.4% 0.1% 0.0% 0.8% 1.1%
Membership dues 2.2% 2.5% 1.3% 2.6% 2.7%
Investment income 3.4% 2.8% 8.2% 2.6% 2.6%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 90.0% 94.6% 90.4% 93.9% 93.5%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $323,042 $326,193 $393,237 $394,344 $444,144
Total expenses, % change over prior year 1.7% 1.0% 20.6% 0.3% 12.6%
Personnel 53.2% 55.5% 48.5% 49.9% 57.8%
Professional fees 2.5% 2.4% 2.0% 9.8% 13.4%
Occupancy 2.9% 3.1% 1.8% 0.6% 0.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 2.1% 6.9% 9.0% 10.4% 6.5%
All other expenses 39.3% 32.1% 38.8% 29.3% 21.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $323,042 $326,193 $393,237 $394,344 $444,344
One month of savings $26,920 $27,183 $32,770 $32,862 $37,012
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $505
Total full costs (estimated) $349,962 $353,376 $426,007 $427,206 $481,861

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 11.8 15.0 21.8 21.1 23.3
Months of cash and investments 25.6 28.7 35.0 36.0 37.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 25.4 27.0 34.7 34.8 36.5
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $318,860 $407,359 $715,031 $693,025 $860,817
Investments $369,048 $372,658 $432,808 $489,526 $521,404
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $10,713 $10,713 $10,713 $10,713 $11,218
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 91.4% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 97.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.3% 6.2% 1.1% 3.2% 2.4%
Unrestricted net assets $685,611 $735,289 $1,137,177 $1,144,984 $1,352,542
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $685,611 $735,289 $1,137,177 $1,144,984 $1,352,542

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Stacey Matrazzo

Stacey Matrazzo became the Florida Wildflower Foundation’s executive director in 2021. She has been with the organization since 2008, having served as a contractor (2008–2015) and program manager (2015–2021). She is the co-author of Native Plants for Florida Gardens, which she wrote with botanist/restoration ecologist Nancy Bissett. She is an environmental educator with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and a masters degree in liberal studies from Rollins College, where she is also an adjunct professor. A native Floridian and certified Florida Master Naturalist, Stacey spends much of her free time kayaking, hiking, birding and photographing Florida’s amazing natural environments.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Florida Wildflower Foundation Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Sara Burke

Carolyn Schaag

Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, Inc.

Anne Mackay

Florida League of Cities

Nancy Bissett

The Natives, Inc.

Marissa Kaprow

Salt Marsh CPA

Melissa Hunt

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

David Price

Bok Tower Gardens

Mark Russell

Four Seasons

Jeff Caster

Terry Zinn

Wildflowers of Florida, Inc

Fatima Elkott

University of South Florida

Jeff Henry

Civil Engineer and Project Manager

Kody Smith

Dix.Hite+Partners

CJ McCartney

Environmental Resources Management

Mona Johnston

Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/05/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.