PLATINUM2024

Piedmont Environmental Council

aka P.E.C.   |   Warrenton, VA   |  https://pecva.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Piedmont Environmental Council

EIN: 54-0935569


Mission

Protect and restore the lands and waters of the Virginia Piedmont, while building stronger, more sustainable communities.

Ruling year info

1973

President

Mr. Christopher Miller

Main address

PO Box 460

Warrenton, VA 20188 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-0935569

Subject area info

Farmlands

Community food systems

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Farmers

NTEE code info

Environmental Quality, Protection, and Beautification N.E.C. (C99)

Farmland Preservation (K25)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Land Conservation

The Piedmont Environmental Council has helped landowners permanently protect more than 430,000 acres of rural or natural land through conservation easements, helping ensure that the Virginia Piedmont is always characterized by its open spaces, healthy environment and cultural resources. PEC is working toward an ambitious goal of protecting more than 100,000 additional acres of farm, forest, cultural and other priority open spaces in our region by the end of 2030. With the achievement of this goal, 30 percent of the lands within our service region would be permanently protected, reaching a critical threshold for sustainability, biodiversity and climate resilience. Longer term, PEC has a goal of more than one million acres protected, representing about half of the land in our nine-county service area.

Population(s) Served

Through land conservation and hands-on restoration activities, PEC collaborates with landowners, nonprofit organizations, governmental agencies, and volunteers to establish stream-side tree buffers, connect aquatic habitat for native brook trout, install stream fencing and alternative watering systems for livestock, and restore healthy soils to curb erosion. PEC’s longstanding relationships with rural and agricultural landowners make us a trusted messenger and partner with Soil and Water Conservation Districts and other agencies that administer funding programs for voluntary water quality improvements. When weighing in on development proposals, zoning, and comprehensive plans, PEC advocates for thoughtful consideration of implications on local and regional water supply.

Population(s) Served

Conservation of land remains a critical tool we employ to protect and improve the range of native flora and fauna thriving in our region. Additionally, from urban and suburban communities to wilderness areas in the rural Piedmont, PEC helps landowners deploy land management practices that create or improve habitat for native wildlife and pollinators and that foster well-connected plant and animal habitat corridors. As a founding partner of the Virginia Grassland Birding Initiative, PEC is assisting agricultural landowners to adapt their farming and haying practices to restore grassland habitat for native birds. This work also includes a focus on forest land, notably the large forest blocks along the Blue Ridge that provide critical habitat and water quality protection around Shenandoah National Park and the Appalachian Trail.

Population(s) Served

Parks, trails, and sidewalks help weave a community together, creating a stronger sense of place and connection and fostering economic development. PEC actively works with community members, partner organization and localities on these types of projects throughout our nine-county regions. The need for more, well-distributed public access to parks and green spaces throughout the Piedmont became manifest during the global pandemic, when residents sought respite and renewal in natural areas, parks, and trails like never before. Research shows that access to nature improves not only individual health, but also the well-being of communities.

Land conservation, which requires expertise and familiarity with complex real estate transactions, is the key to opening up new trails, parks and other conserved spaces for all people to see, experience, and enjoy. Access to recreational land and water resources also fosters appreciation. Expanding people’s access to conserved and nature-filled places.

Population(s) Served

A thoughtful approach to land use planning, paired with decision making that balances growth and development with natural and cultural resource protection, is vital to maintaining a healthy and vibrant Piedmont region. For each of its nine counties, PEC has professional staff who delve into development proposals, zoning, and comprehensive plans in order to advocate for conservation and smart growth. This staffing model allows the organization to participate locally at planning commission and board of supervisor meetings, join regional planning exercises, and advocate for sound land use policy at the state level. In these ways, we are able to weigh in directly and help residents engage effectively.

Population(s) Served

PEC advocates for an energy system that is smarter, more efficient and better accounts for the negative externalities arising from the choices we make about consumption, generation, transmission and distribution. We believe PEC’s on-the-ground perspective, dealing in both policy and its direct impacts on the communities we serve, to be invaluable in the conversations about energy taking place at the local and state level. PEC is recognized for its expertise in local land use planning and policy. We have expanded our staff expertise related to energy policy and siting, given its enormous implications for the climate, our natural, agricultural, and cultural resources, and our communities.

Population(s) Served

Preserving and protecting the farms, fields and forests that are so characteristic to the Piedmont region depends on a strong, vibrant sustainable farm economy that keeps these rural lands economically viable. PEC works directly with landowners to conserve farmland and with farm families to deploy sustainable management practices that increase productivity, while also protecting agricultural soils and the streams that provide our drinking water. Through our Buy Fresh Buy Local program and guides, we directly promote working farms and the fresh, local food they produce. We also directly support the region's food insecure population through PEC’s Community Farm at Roundabout Meadows, donating 100 percent of what is grown and harvested by volunteers and staff to Loudoun Hunger Relief, which makes sure the food gets into the hands of those who need it most.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Land Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual figures of acres protected within our nine-county service region. As of 2024, more than 446,000 acres have been permanently protected within our region.

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Clean Water

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Tree plantings take place as part of PEC's Plantings for the Piedmont initiative. Our goal is to restore critical riparian buffers along the headwaters within our service region.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a Virginia Piedmont where people act on a belief that conservation is essential to creating and maintaining vibrant, healthy communities. Our region is characterized by connected natural and cultural landscapes, thriving villages, towns and cities, clean rivers and streams, and working farms and forests. It’s a beautiful place where residents across all walks of life participate in decisions about its future.

Serve as a thought leader. Communities throughout the Virginia Piedmont rely on PEC staff to do the research, attend the meetings, write comments and provide context and a vision for a better future.

Shape public policy. As informed participants with an eye toward protecting natural resources and advancing sustainability, PEC staff engage at the local, state and federal level to shape public policy in a positive direction.

Empower people to participate. Informed and driven by the latest research, strong relationships, and the personal passions of our staff, our on-the-ground, hands-on education, demonstration, and advocacy work inspires greater public participation.

Encourage direct action. Individual and collective action is necessary to make change. We ask residents of the Virginia Piedmont and beyond to do the small stuff and the large stuff: volunteer, plant a tree, get rooftop solar, buy local food, practice sustainable land management, weigh in with elected officials, pursue a conservation easement. There are countless ways to make a difference today.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Piedmont Environmental Council
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.32

Average of 0.87 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.2

Average of 2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

39%

Average of 24% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Piedmont Environmental Council

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Piedmont Environmental Council

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Piedmont Environmental Council

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Piedmont Environmental Council’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $611,273 $3,500,122 $333,664 $315,438 $86,475
As % of expenses 10.1% 67.7% 6.4% 5.6% 1.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $482,205 $3,359,977 $181,816 $148,421 -$89,110
As % of expenses 7.8% 63.3% 3.4% 2.6% -1.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $6,203,775 $8,493,558 $5,764,304 $6,128,085 $6,588,230
Total revenue, % change over prior year 34.8% 36.9% -32.1% 6.3% 7.5%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.9% 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 10.8% 2.2% 11.0% 7.1% 1.7%
All other grants and contributions 91.5% 97.0% 88.6% 89.9% 96.4%
Other revenue -3.2% 0.7% 0.4% 2.9% 1.9%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $6,043,872 $5,168,754 $5,245,087 $5,617,697 $6,694,812
Total expenses, % change over prior year 31.8% -14.5% 1.5% 7.1% 19.2%
Personnel 56.3% 67.8% 75.6% 72.0% 73.0%
Professional fees 10.0% 15.2% 8.0% 12.9% 11.3%
Occupancy 3.6% 3.8% 4.0% 2.7% 2.4%
Interest 1.1% 0.3% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0%
Pass-through 10.0% 0.9% 0.3% 0.7% 2.0%
All other expenses 19.0% 12.0% 11.9% 11.8% 11.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $6,172,940 $5,308,899 $5,396,935 $5,784,714 $6,870,397
One month of savings $503,656 $430,730 $437,091 $468,141 $557,901
Debt principal payment $0 $1,800,000 $0 $300,000 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $234,146 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $6,676,596 $7,773,775 $5,834,026 $6,552,855 $7,428,298

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.2 1.1 2.2 1.9 1.2
Months of cash and investments 2.2 1.1 2.2 1.9 1.2
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.5 8.2 8.7 8.6 7.2
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,097,565 $489,773 $960,024 $911,513 $687,622
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $2,580,234 $140,390 $147,885 $521,019 $529,802
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $3,707,432 $3,941,578 $4,005,177 $4,089,710 $4,146,772
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 23.7% 25.9% 28.7% 32.2% 36.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 26.1% 3.7% 5.8% 3.7% 4.7%
Unrestricted net assets $3,096,211 $6,456,188 $6,638,004 $6,786,425 $6,697,315
Temporarily restricted net assets $3,731,648 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $3,731,648 $3,600,347 $3,785,900 $3,980,850 $3,787,793
Total net assets $6,827,859 $10,056,535 $10,423,904 $10,767,275 $10,485,108

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Mr. Christopher Miller

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Piedmont Environmental Council

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Piedmont Environmental Council

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Piedmont Environmental Council

Board of directors
as of 04/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Jean Perin


Board co-chair

George Ohrstrom, II

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/26/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/31/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.