PLATINUM2024

Code Girls United

Empowering girls with the language of code and problem solving power.

aka 83-1174058   |   Kalispell, MT   |  http://www.codegirlsunited.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Code Girls United

EIN: 83-1174058


Mission

To expand the future career opportunities of 4th 8th grade girls through hands on experiences in coding, technology, and business.

Ruling year info

2018

Principal Officer

Marianne Smith

Main address

PO Box 8272

Kalispell, MT 59904 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Marianne Smith

EIN

83-1174058

Subject area info

Education

Technology

Job creation and workforce development

Youth services

Women's services

Population served info

Children and youth

Women and girls

Girls

NTEE code info

Girls Clubs (O22)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The lack of women in the world of technology. Women play a key role in economic growth through the use of their technology and business skills, but lack early education and training in technical and business skills to prepare them for future educational opportunities and careers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Yearly After school

Girls, 4th – 8th grade, meet weekly after school throughout the year. The first half of the year involves learning the basics of Computer Science. The second half of the year, the girls split into teams choose a service project, then complete a business case and then code their app. The girls then compete in local, country, and international competitions. Girls gain technical and business skills while gaining confidence.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Scholarships are awarded at the annual App Challenge. We started with 3 winning teams and now award scholarships to the top 6 winning teams. The scholarship value is split between team members.

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We serve Rural and Tribal Girls throughout Montana. Our population consists of 95% Rural, 22% Tribal girls, and 78% of the total are considered economically or socially disadvantaged.

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is based on post survey from our after school and summer camp programs.

Number of teachers recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Teachers and volunteers have been trained in Computer Science which is not a requirement in Montana.

Number of children who have the ability to use language for expression and to communicate with others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

% of Post survey results of students regarding their assessment of abilities to prepare a business plan and to execute a presentation of their projects.

Number of students with good social and leadership skills and self-discipline

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

% at Post survey results of self confidence and self efficacy metrics from student surveys regarding meeting goals and working as a team.

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollar amount of scholarship awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Yearly After school

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Scholarships are awarded to winning teams of the Code Girls United App Challenge in April of every year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To expand the future career opportunities of Rural and Tribal 4th - 8th grade girls though hands on experiences in coding, technology, and business.

Code Girls United's strategy for achieving sustainability goals of the reduction of poverty, quality education, gender equity, and decent work and economic growth involves providing the opportunity for young girls to attain education. Our technology and business education focuses on a real-world simulated experience that focuses on the interests of girls. Our first half of the year focuses on computer science concepts creating apps that were created with girls' interests in mind. The second have of the year the girls form teams, pick a community problem to solve, create a business plan including marketing research and statistics, create their app, and present their project to a panel of business and technology judges at least three times. The experience is not just learning to code a game which is not appealing to the majority of girls, but is allowing them to learn to use technology to solve the problems they care about.
According to Accenture and AAUW studies, girls show an interest in computer science at age 10, but that interest declines dramatically as the girls progress through high school. The studies also indicated that 62% of girls who participated in programs to learn about technology together with other girls were more likely to take more classes offered or proceed to higher learning in a STEM field.
We have found that out of our students from our first and second year of operation that are attending or will attend college, 74% are choosing STEM fields, with 50% choosing computer science.
The combination of early education, girl-centric curriculum, and allowing girls to use technology to solve their problems is the strategy that Code Girls United has implemented to reduce poverty by directing girls into STEM fields that typically pay more and especially for Tribal girls does not require them to move. We have increased the educational opportunities across the state of Montana for rural and Tribal girls and for teachers. We will be changing the gender inequality that is evident in most STEM fields and STEM education. We also are strategically impacting decent work and economic growth by providing girls with the opportunity to have better paying jobs and also learn what it takes to actually bring a product to market, work together towards goals, and run a business of their own.

Code Girls United was originally founded by women with technical degrees with business experience. The original curriculum was developed to deliver technical content in a fun and girl-centric fashion, but with a mind on the practical aspects of business. Our programming and curriculum has evolved into modules suitable for beginners, intermediate, advanced, and two Tribal high school programs. Additionally, we have a rigorous training program for teachers and volunteers.
We have 6 full time staff, 2 part time staff, and 4 interns to support our programming and organization throughout the state. We also have incredible volunteers throughout the state who help to add to our program's strength and sustainability.
Our content is fully online in a Google workspace and can be accessed anywhere. We continue to improve our content and our delivery. Our programs are scalable and replicable using technology to our advantage to grow our organization.
Organizationally, we continue to strive for efficiencies to create an organization that can quickly pivot when necessary and provide the services we offer. Our staff participates in yearly training to support new technologies or management and leadership concepts to improve the performance of the organization.

Code Girls United has grown substantially since our start. We have gone from the basement of a local restaurant to 38 statewide programs and 2 fully online programs. We have improved our programs and offerings so that girls have a path to advance through more difficult concepts and work. We also have created content for Tribal girls that is culturally relevant. We have hired a Blackfeet Tribal member working as our Tribal Liaison, and a Tribal Intern who has helped us shape our Tribal content. Our board has also achieved the level of strategic management rather than at the beginning being more task oriented and volunteering to also do work for the organization.
We will continue to grow in Montana with a goal of serving 10% of girls in Montana over the life of the organization by 2026. Our goral is to also to serve 60% of the 5 Reservations in Montana.
Additionally, we are increasing our summer programming to 6 additional locations in 2024 and 10 in 2025.
In addition to schools and libraries, we have also increased our partnerships with the United Way, Boys and Girls Clubs, and the DoD Starbase program. We are in talks with Starbase personnel to bring our programs to other Starbase locations in rural and Tribal areas.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Code Girls United
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19.33

Average of 4.83 over 4 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15.8

Average of 8.5 over 4 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11%

Average of 8% over 4 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Code Girls United

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Code Girls United

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Code Girls United

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Code Girls United’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $61,235 $101,608
As % of expenses 41.4% 28.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $61,235 $101,608
As % of expenses 41.4% 28.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $250,897 $609,755
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 143.0%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.1%
Government grants 0.0% 30.4%
All other grants and contributions 99.8% 69.5%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $147,842 $363,185
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 145.7%
Personnel 65.2% 53.3%
Professional fees 12.7% 3.1%
Occupancy 3.8% 5.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 18.2% 38.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $147,842 $363,185
One month of savings $12,320 $30,265
Debt principal payment $8,600 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $168,762 $393,450

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2021 2022
Months of cash 18.2 15.8
Months of cash and investments 18.2 15.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 6.7 6.1
Balance sheet composition info 2021 2022
Cash $224,476 $479,542
Investments $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 5.2%
Unrestricted net assets $82,178 $183,786
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $39,243 $39,243
Total net assets $224,476 $454,729

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2021 2022
Material data errors Yes Yes

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Principal Officer

Marianne Smith

Former Lockheed Engineer at NASA, High Tech business entrepreneur, FVCC Computer Science Adjunct, and founder of Code Girls United, helping girls in 4th - 8th grade become problem solvers through training in computer coding and business skills

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Code Girls United

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Code Girls United

Board of directors
as of 02/05/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Ben Thiem

Montana West Economic Development

Term: 2024 - 2026


Board co-chair

Kary Meschke

Wade Financial Advisory

Term: 2024 - 2026

Laura Garbacz

Deloitte

Kate Mayer

Insight

John Ghekiere

Class One

Mary Ann Cummings

Montana State University

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/24/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser