Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

We build strength, stability, self-reliance and shelter.

Houston, TX   |  www.houstonhabitat.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

EIN: 76-0207084


Mission

Seeking to put God's love into action, Houston Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope.

Notes from the nonprofit

Houston Habitat works to address Houston's gap in home ownership and the availability of affordable homes by partnering with low-income families to help them achieve home ownership. By providing financial and homeownership training and the opportunity to help build their own homes, Houston Habitat helps to ensure that these families have the knowledge and wherewithal to maintain homeownership. The organization has built more than 1,050 homes in 11 Houston neighborhoods, including the Fifth Ward and the Northeast and Southeast quadrants. The loss of homes from Hurricane Harvey and the need to shelter in place resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated the already critical shortage of low-income single family homes in Houston and further illuminated how important it is to have a safe, decent, affordable home. Moreover, providing a vehicle by which low-income Blacks can achieve homeownership helps to address the impact of anti-Black racism.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Ms. Allison Hay

CFO

Ms. Myra Mallet

Main address

3750 North McCarty St

Houston, TX 77029 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

76-0207084

Subject area info

Community improvement

Housing development

Population served info

Adults

Families

Low-income people

Working poor

NTEE code info

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Houston Habitat addresses Houston's affordable housing gap by constructing well-built, sustainable homes and partnering with low-income families to help them achieve home ownership. By providing financial and homeownership training and the opportunity to help build their own homes, Houston Habitat helps to ensure that families have the knowledge and wherewithal to maintain homeownership. The organization has built more than 1,050 homes in 11 Houston neighborhoods, including the Fifth Ward and the Northeast and Southeast quadrants. The loss of homes from Hurricane Harvey and the need to shelter in place resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic have exacerbated the already critical shortage of low-income single family homes in Houston and further illuminated how important it is to have a safe, decent, affordable home. Moreover, providing a vehicle by which low-income Blacks can achieve homeownership helps to address the impact of anti-Black racism.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

General Program

Houston Habitat for Humanity's mission work includes new home construction, home rehabilitation and repair, infrastructure development for new communities, neighborhood revitalization, and community building in Houston.

Houston Habitat has built more than 1,100 homes in 14 Houston neighborhoods, including the Fifth Ward and Northeast and southeast quadrants. A shortage of low-income single-family homes existed before Hurricane Harvey, and the loss of many homes exacerbated the need; therefore, Houston Habitat continues to fill that gap.

The organization has repaired countless other homes throughout Houston, principally repairing homes damaged by 2015, 2016, and 2017 floods. Since Hurricane Harvey alone, Houston Habitat has restored more than 600 Harvey ravaged homes and 100 homes damaged by Winter Storm Uri.
The magnitude of the Houston Habitat new home construction and repair of homes program depends on the public's support, and the need only continues to grow.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents
Low-income people
Working poor
Adults

Houston Habitat builds affordable homes to address the need for low-income families to have access to decent housing. The houses are beautiful, energy-efficient and easy to maintain. The organization partners with families with a household income of 80% or below AMI for the Greater Houston area, preparing families to be successful homeowners. Families help build new homes, complete financial literacy classes and home maintenance training.

Through this program, Houston Habitat seeks to remove the traditional obstacles to purchasing a home to accommodate families who otherwise would not be able to qualify. Houston Habitat works to change lives and empower families through safe, decent homes, where parents are better prepared to nurture their children so the next generation may prosper. Houston Habitat's vision is one where everyone has a decent place to live and the ability to build wealth for future generations.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adults
Low-income people
Working poor

Where we work

Awards

2015 Energy Star Partner 2015

US Environmental Protection Agency

20 Standards of Charitable Accountability 2015

Better Business Bureau of Houston

Affiliations & memberships

Habitat for Humanity International 1987

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2018

Greater Houston Builders Association 2019

Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter 1987

EPA Energy Star Award 2020

EPA Energy Star Award 1996

EPA Energy Star Award 1999

EPA Energy Star Award 2007

EPA Energy Star Award 2008

EPA Energy Star Award 2009

EPA Energy Star Award 2010

EPA Energy Star Award 2011

EPA Energy Star Award 2013

EPA Energy Star Award 2014

EPA Energy Star Award 2015

EPA Energy Star Award 2016

EPA Energy Star Award 2017

EPA Energy Star Award 2018

EPA Energy Star Award 2019

EPA Energy Star Award 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new homes built that helps reduce the current affordable housing gap

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Working poor

Related Program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2017 and 2018 were impacted by Hurricane Harvey. 2020 was impacted by COVID 19.

Number of low-income homes repaired that preserves affordable housing for current and future family use

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Low-income people, Working poor, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Working poor, Low-income people

Related Program

Affordable Housing

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These figures reflect the number of households, not individuals.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Houston Habitat provides workable solutions to Houston’s acute affordable housing shortage through its home ownership and home repair programs. In partnership with low income families, Houston Habitat provides a hand-up helping families achieve and/or preserve homeownership, improve quality of life and become empowered to obtain and maintain stability and self-reliance. Houston Habitat helps uplift underserved and under-resourced communities and residents through Neighborhood Revitalization, Community Development and On-the-Job Training Programs.

Houston Habitat constructs new sustainable homes to increase affordable housing stock for low-income families in the 80% or below income bracket. Future homeowners are introduced to Houston Habitat through in person and online information seminars and one-on-one meetings, agency referrals and word of mouth. They then complete applications for the program. The Houston Habitat homeownership program prepares future homeowners for ownership over 12-18 months. Components include financial education and counseling/coaching, homeownership and home maintenance training. Similarly, Houston Habitat’s repair program helps low-income homeowners whose homes need sustainable repairs or have other unaffordable maintenance issues in order to preserve existing housing.
Through its Neighborhood Revitalization Program, Houston Habitat provides sustainable solutions such as home repair to seniors, veterans, the disabled and other vulnerable populations; aging in place modifications for seniors and other quality of life improvements; building community gardens in food deserts to promote healthy eating; improving exercise and outdoor facilities and bringing communities together through activities and events. Houston Habitat also operates the Build Your Future Program, an on-the-job construction training program for young men.

Houston Habitat has over 30 years experience in building homes and repairing homes for low income families in the Houston area. Qualified families seeking to build a better life for themselves and their children help to build their homes alongside a knowledgeable staff of construction leaders and volunteers dedicated to building energy efficient and sustainable homes for qualified families. With this successful model, Houston Habitat will continue to meet established goals for the next 30 plus years.

Recent accomplishments include:
During the past 2 years, Houston Habitat has:
• Closed 37 homes, resulting in homeownership for 37 low-income homeowners (130 + people)
• Provided home repairs for 199 low-income homeowners, ably stewarding over $8.6 million dollars in Hurricane Harvey repair funding
• Provided aging-in-place home modifications and repair for 109 seniors
• Supported Settegast community by designing, building and managing a community garden; purchasing and installing low-impact, senior-friendly, exercise equipment at Hobart Taylor Park; hosting community meetings and events with the New Progressive Civic Club.
• Supported Houston’s Historic Fifth Ward by providing volunteer management services at the Farmer Street Garden, providing fresh vegetables to residents, and building two new affordable homes for low-income families.
• Initiated the Build a Better Future job training program with 11 trainees to learn residential construction.

What's next: Houston Habitat is undertaking a transformative project, Robins Landing, to build a vibrant community of affordable housing with a multitude of services and community amenities. Robins Landing is not just a subdivision full of homes; it is a community of people that will include:
• More than 450 affordable single-family homes and up to 500 multi-family units
• Amenities such as a health clinic, public library, community meeting spaces, a food hall, and retail shopping
• Access to gardens, parks, and trails to support healthy lifestyles
• Robust private and public partnerships to forge a supportive and sustainable community
More information available as we move forward.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Houston Habitat serves low-to-moderate-income Houstonians. The organization meets with local civic and other groups to receive feedback on future and current projects.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In the development of a new community, Houston Habitat is including amenities and resiliency features that address the needs indicated by residents of the neighborhood.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback has helped us to determine the amenities and features in the next community we are developing. Over the years it has influenced the way we build houses.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10.36

Average of 6.28 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15.1

Average of 9.8 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 19% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $188,712 $2,244,254 $2,443,925 $1,363,138 $1,683,110
As % of expenses 1.8% 29.7% 20.0% 9.1% 12.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $20,891 $2,080,373 $2,222,545 $1,101,796 $1,423,999
As % of expenses 0.2% 26.9% 17.8% 7.2% 10.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $10,715,448 $16,228,977 $16,442,711 $13,390,246 $11,315,347
Total revenue, % change over prior year 9.1% 51.5% 1.3% -18.6% -15.5%
Program services revenue 54.0% 11.8% 23.8% 33.2% 54.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 1.4% 0.6%
Government grants 0.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 40.5% 81.4% 69.8% 60.6% 39.5%
Other revenue 4.8% 6.8% 6.4% 4.9% 5.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $10,344,694 $7,556,985 $12,235,818 $15,011,894 $13,201,487
Total expenses, % change over prior year 24.4% -26.9% 61.9% 22.7% -12.1%
Personnel 25.0% 38.0% 25.8% 23.5% 26.3%
Professional fees 3.9% 5.3% 5.5% 4.8% 4.1%
Occupancy 1.0% 2.1% 2.8% 2.4% 2.7%
Interest 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 70.0% 54.5% 65.6% 69.3% 66.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $10,512,515 $7,720,866 $12,457,198 $15,273,236 $13,460,598
One month of savings $862,058 $629,749 $1,019,652 $1,250,991 $1,100,124
Debt principal payment $55,000 $35,000 $175,000 $21,081 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $657,703 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $11,429,573 $8,385,615 $14,309,553 $16,545,308 $14,560,722

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 7.1 23.9 15.5 12.1 15.1
Months of cash and investments 7.1 24.0 15.5 12.2 15.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 29.5 43.6 28.5 24.2 29.0
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $6,099,584 $15,037,114 $15,796,755 $15,185,362 $16,574,105
Investments $41,257 $46,310 $39,889 $45,607 $46,294
Receivables $14,078,567 $13,190,535 $12,916,706 $12,599,106 $11,771,127
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $2,798,884 $2,929,077 $3,587,753 $3,765,092 $3,802,278
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 67.2% 68.8% 62.4% 66.4% 72.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.7% 5.7% 2.6% 3.0% 4.4%
Unrestricted net assets $26,087,984 $28,168,357 $30,390,902 $31,492,698 $32,916,697
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,274,084 $7,233,654 $8,989,538 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,274,084 $7,233,654 $8,989,538 $6,009,621 $2,440,261
Total net assets $27,362,068 $35,402,011 $39,380,440 $37,502,319 $35,356,958

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Allison Hay

CFO

Myra Mallet

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Houston Habitat for Humanity, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Leslie Cobb-Hector

VACO

Term: 2021 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Lee Herman

Hirsch & Westheimer, P.C.

Term: 2020 - 2021

Stephen Goldberg

Reitred Attorney

Brian Ching

Gail Rogers

Wolters Kluwer ELM Solutions

Joel Deretchin

Lee Herman

Hirsch & Westheimer, P.C.

Crystal Allen

Transwestern

Scott Burns

NRG Retail/Reliant

Heather Crowder

Phillipa 66

Shashank Karve

Retired Executive

Tim Kollatschny

Shell Oil Company

Valerie Loebig

Conn's

Chad Millis

Millis Development + Construction

Christie Obiaya

Bechtel OG&C

Allen Satterwhite

Chevron

Thomas Stroh

Elevation Land Solutions

Sonya Troullier

Comprehensive Financial Design Group

Rosy Zuklic

Phillips 66

Zach Parrish

Amegy Namk

Craig Nishimura

PRICEWATERHOUSE COOPERS

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/24/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser