PLATINUM2024

Children's Home Society of Florida

We do good.

aka CHILDREN'S HOME SOCIETY OF FLORIDA, HOME OFFICE   |   Orlando, FL   |  http://www.chsfl.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Children's Home Society of Florida

EIN: 59-0192430


Mission

Building bridges to success for children.

Ruling year info

1941

President and CEO

Ms. Andry Sweet

Main address

5766 S. Semoran Blvd.

Orlando, FL 32822 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-0192430

Subject area info

Mental health counseling

Family services

Youth services

Population served info

Children and youth

Families

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

With a bold direction to end the need for foster care as we know it, CHS is delivering solutions that keep more families safe, strong and together. CHS is focused on prevention: preventing more entries into foster care and, for children who do enter foster care, preventing lengthy stays in foster care. As 75% of entries into the foster care system are related to neglect, we believe we can dramatically reduce the number of children entering foster care by reaching more children and families with front-end prevention services that help families overcome challenges before they turn into crises – thus keeping more kids safe at home and empowering more families to succeed.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CHS - The Broad View

CHS delivers a continuum of innovative, evidence-based services and solutions to empower children and parents to build upon their strengths so they can realize their full potential and lead healthy, responsible, productive lives. Serving children of all ages and families of all types, CHS’ “cradle to career” approach includes early childhood education and child abuse prevention programs, foster care, adoption and ongoing post-adoption support and counseling, parent education and coaching, and independent and transitional living for youth who are on the verge of homelessness and those who are preparing to exit foster care at age 18 without a family. CHS also provides child, parent and family counseling; family building, strengthening and preservation programs; mentoring; various intervention programs for infants through teens to help them work through trauma and other struggles; support and intervention for families with truant, runaway and defiant teens; intervention services to help youth avoid the juvenile justice system; well baby care, access to children's mental health services, care for developmentally disabled children, and more. Additionally, CHS is a founding partner, along with the University of Central Florida and Orange County Public Schools, of the innovative Community Partnership SchoolsTM model, which has proven to eliminate barriers to education for students in low-income, struggling schools. CHS is a founding member of the Child Welfare League of America, co-founder of the Florida CEO Round Table for Children, a member of the National Alliance for Strong Families and Communities and of Children’s Home Society of America, is accredited by the National Council on Accreditation, and is licensed by the Florida Department of Children & Families. Additionally, we were one of the first organizations in the country to be recognized as an Innovator in LGBTQ inclusion from the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, All Children All Families program, recognizing our commitment to do the very best for every child and family – regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

We build strong, safe, healthy families for children. Currently, 1 in 4 children U.S. children suffer abuse or neglect – and 75% of entries into the foster care are due to neglect. When family challenges interfere with children’s safety and well-being, leading to involvement in foster care, CHS partners with parents to provide services that empower them to overcome obstacles that brought them into the foster care system. We believe in their potential, and we build upon their strengths so they can safely bring their children back home. As we work with the entire family, we also provide services and caring support to help children heal from their trauma so they can find brighter futures ahead. In some cases, it may never be possible for a child to safely return home; when this occurs, CHS works to find the right forever family for a child to join through adoption. In all we do, we focus on the best interest of every child, keeping kids safe, stable and ready to thrive.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

We build strong foundations for children and families. This begins prenatally, as we provide comprehensive early childhood solutions so children can grow up in safe, healthy homes, reach key developmental milestones, form healthy bonds with their caregivers, and enter kindergarten ready to learn. Additionally, our programs empower parents to reach family and personal goals – including advancing their education and securing jobs, both important parts of maintaining family stability and lowering family and economic stressors. Without access to early childhood programs, children are 25% more likely to drop out of school, 40% more likely to become teenage parents and 70% more likely to be arrested for a violent crime. We are combating these statistics by delivering the solutions proven to work.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

We empower children, adults and families to reach their full potential by helping them regain control of their lives through quality counseling and mental health services. The incredible need for these services is reflected in the staggering statistics: In Florida, 56,000+ adults and 180,000+ children live with serious mental illness -- and nearly half the population will struggle with less severe forms during their lives. Sadly, suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth and young adults ages 10-34, and untreated mental health issues are significant contributors. Through high-quality, trauma-informed counseling, CHS empowers children, teens and adults to work through and overcome severe roadblocks – including trauma, grief, anxiety, depression and more – that may prevent them from realizing their full potential. Additionally, during the COVID-19 public health crisis, CHS created a 24/7 crisis intervention “warm line” to provide immediate, free counseling to individuals struggling to cope with the insecurities and instability brought about by COVID-19.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Through innovative solutions, we change life trajectories
and transform communities. Today, 23% of Florida children live in poverty, and
these kids are 5 times more likely to drop out of high school. Continuing the
statistical trajectory, 67% of the prison population are high school dropouts.
CHS is changing these statistics for our most at-risk children and youth
through high-quality mentoring, independent living, expanded educational and
leadership opportunities, and our proven Community Partnership SchoolsTM model.
As we partner with kids, parents, schools, universities, local health centers
and engaged community organizations to build strong families, stronger
communities emerge as well.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) [for Children and Family Services] - Accreditation 1982

Charity Navigator 2008

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 3 Year Accreditation 2007

Child Placing Agency 1990

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

National Child Traumatic Stress Network 2008

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2004

Council of Accreditation of Child and Family Services, Inc. 1982

National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) 2007

United Way Member Agency 1985

National Safe Place 1989

Alliance for Children and Families - Member 2010

Alliance for Children and Families - Member 2013

Florida Chamber of Commerce, Prosperity Project 2024

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of children who complete our Early Childhood Programs remain safe at home with their families

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Building Strong Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nearly 100% of families that complete our voluntary home-visiting early childhood programs remain free from abuse or neglect – and never enter the foster care system.

Graduation rate percentage at Edward H. White Academy of Leadership

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Empowering children and young adults to realize their full potential

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Graduation rates increased from 67% to 88% between 2015 and 2019. Disciplinary referrals dropped by more than 1,000 from 2016 to 2017.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With a bold direction to end the need for foster care as we know it, CHS is delivering solutions that keep more families safe, strong and together. CHS is focused on prevention: preventing more entries into foster care and, for children who do enter foster care, preventing lengthy stays in foster care. As 75% of entries into the foster care system are related to neglect, we believe we can dramatically reduce the number of children entering foster care by reaching more children and families with front-end prevention services that help families overcome challenges before they turn into crises – thus keeping more kids safe at home and empowering more families to succeed.

Kids in foster care have already lost their sense of what it means to be "normal."" And teens finding safety in a group home struggle even more with this loss. Kids and teens who've suffered trauma have learned one thing in life: survival. It can be hard to transition out of survival mode, to understand how to dream. So we meet them where they're at and offer creative activities that encourage them to explore new passions, which may lead to career or life aspirations. Some find a creative outlet in broadcast media, others find peace during yoga, and some find culinary talents during cooking class. Sometimes, kids are so severely traumatized that they're unable to understand or control their emotions and behaviors. Our foster parents have tremendous hearts and patience - but they need more. So we implemented training, resources and support to help foster parents understand trauma and feel confident parenting traumatized children in a way that contributes toward their healing and well-being. When kids struggle with deep family challenges - poverty, domestic violence, substance abuse, homelessness, hunger- it's pretty tough to think about passing a test. Beyond the impact these issues have on a child's ability to focus in school, it's difficult for families to find help they need. So we're working with committed partners - Orange County Public Schools, the University of Central Florida, and other health, cultural and social service organizations - to integrate programs, activities and services into the education and lives of students in struggling communities. Our first community school opened in 2012 in Orlando to serve Evans High School students and their families. Services will evolve with the community, rooting Evans Community School into the heart of the community. We're constantly looking to the latest research and exploring opportunities to continually improve how we help children and families. We do it because our kids deserve it.

We're working toward collective impact, partnering with other organizations as well as universities to make a dramatic difference for children, teens, families and communities. CHS is on the forefront of issues that face families in communities throughout Florida, finding long-term solutions so children can grow up safe, healthy and happy. Built on a foundation of resilience and grit, CHS has leveraged its 118-year history to meet families as they are and support them to a successful future. CHS has multiple capabilities and partnerships to address the many challenges that face our families. From helping a new mom learn to be her child’s first teacher to working with a teen recovering from childhood trauma, CHS comes alongside, partners with and supports families on paths toward successful futures that last generations.

Together with our partners at UCF and Orange County Public Schools, we opened the first ever Community Partnership School at Evans High School in 2009. Since then, we've expanded this model 18 other schools (elementary through high school) throughout the state. We have several programs in Florida that work with new parents to help them learn how to safely and appropriately care for their children, from newborns to adolescents. Additionally, we help parents learn positive coping mechanisms when they become overwhelmed with the demands of child-rearing. These programs are extremely successful; some programs have a nearly 100 percent success rate, meaning that nearly 100 percent of the families that complete the program remain free from abuse.

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.95

Average of 0.79 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.8

Average of 0.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

35%

Average of 25% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Children's Home Society of Florida

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Children's Home Society of Florida

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Children's Home Society of Florida

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Children's Home Society of Florida’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,655,958 $1,662,181 -$2,805,994 $15,665,067 -$2,581,809
As % of expenses 2.3% 1.6% -2.7% 17.4% -2.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $547,064 -$417,401 -$4,711,399 $13,592,248 -$4,045,712
As % of expenses 0.5% -0.4% -4.4% 14.8% -4.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $111,145,666 $108,598,718 $103,473,059 $102,339,754 $97,566,542
Total revenue, % change over prior year -3.8% -2.3% -4.7% -1.1% -4.7%
Program services revenue 10.0% 9.4% 9.6% 9.5% 7.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.6% 0.5% 0.4% 0.4% 0.7%
Government grants 80.8% 78.6% 80.1% 75.3% 77.1%
All other grants and contributions 7.9% 7.2% 6.9% 6.7% 7.5%
Other revenue 0.8% 4.3% 3.0% 8.1% 7.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $113,144,290 $106,274,694 $105,306,686 $90,065,170 $97,604,451
Total expenses, % change over prior year -1.9% -6.1% -0.9% -14.5% 8.4%
Personnel 75.7% 75.4% 76.9% 77.4% 78.2%
Professional fees 3.1% 3.2% 4.0% 4.0% 3.6%
Occupancy 4.0% 3.9% 3.7% 4.7% 3.4%
Interest 0.5% 0.6% 0.4% 0.2% 0.0%
Pass-through 5.4% 4.8% 3.4% 3.9% 4.4%
All other expenses 11.3% 12.0% 11.6% 9.6% 10.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $115,253,184 $108,354,276 $107,212,091 $92,137,989 $99,068,354
One month of savings $9,428,691 $8,856,225 $8,775,557 $7,505,431 $8,133,704
Debt principal payment $244,646 $5,502,036 $384,822 $11,151,916 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $124,926,521 $122,712,537 $116,372,470 $110,795,336 $107,202,058

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.6 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.8
Months of cash and investments 2.0 2.3 2.6 3.4 2.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.7 1.6 1.3 2.2 3.2
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $5,224,697 $5,398,030 $7,779,958 $6,964,071 $6,347,271
Investments $14,082,639 $14,875,440 $14,887,308 $18,497,970 $16,891,387
Receivables $12,554,788 $12,535,861 $11,512,552 $10,200,131 $11,313,832
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $63,853,541 $52,822,599 $51,599,545 $45,970,755 $33,473,813
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 51.0% 48.4% 50.9% 51.4% 55.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 40.0% 38.2% 43.8% 24.1% 22.8%
Unrestricted net assets $29,166,642 $28,749,241 $24,037,842 $37,630,090 $33,584,378
Temporarily restricted net assets $14,788,226 $15,403,203 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $9,933,756 $9,979,957 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $24,721,982 $25,383,160 $25,816,040 $30,118,742 $25,585,690
Total net assets $53,888,624 $54,132,401 $49,853,882 $67,748,832 $59,170,068

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President and CEO

Ms. Andry Sweet

Andry Sweet has more than three decades of experience in
child welfare and behavioral health, and specializes in system improvements
designed to provide comprehensive and innovative services to Florida’s children
and families. She previously worked at the Department of Children and Families,
Substance Abuse and Mental Health program office overseeing performance based
contract management and system of care improvements that were later adopted in
chapter 394, FS. Sweet joined CHS’ executive team as an executive director in
2000. She has since served as vice president of operations, vice president of
innovation and quality management, chief strategy officer, chief of staff,
chief administrative officer and COO. In the early 2000s, Sweet managed the
transition of child welfare services from government to the private sector at
CHS. She led innovative work at CHS, including the development and replication
of Community Partnership Schools in Florida, integrated health care pilots with
Medicaid HMOs and the development of CaseAIM™ to improve child welfare
outcomes. She has held leadership positions for a variety of community boards,
including the Heart of Florida United Way Council of Agency Executives, the
Children’s Cabinet of Seminole County, and the Children’s Cabinet of Orange
County. Most recently, she was the chair of the Evans Community Partnership
School Cabinet. She is currently a board member of the Florida Coalition for
Children. Andry Sweet holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the
Florida Institute of Technology and a Master of Science in Health Services
Administration from the University of Central Florida.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Children's Home Society of Florida

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
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Children's Home Society of Florida

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Children's Home Society of Florida

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Brand Meyer

Wells Fargo Advisors, Senior Managing Director (retired)

Term: 2023 - 2025

Victoria Weber

Hopping Green, & Sams

Frank Gulisano

Summit Realty

Miguel Viyella

Wells Fargo Advisors

Dale Jacobs

Community Volunteer, (retired)

Andrew Duffell

Florida Atlantic Research & Development Authority

Ron Brise

Gunster: Government Affairs Consultant

Brand Meyer

Wells Fargo Advisors

Julie Eason

CNL Financial Group, Inc.

Susan Main

Early Learning Coalition of Duval

Karen Meyer Buesing

Akerman LLP

Russell Jones

Morgan Stanley, Family Wealth Director

Jane Adams

Government & Public Relations Executive, Retired

Juanita Armbrister

FSU/CPEIP, Educational Consultant

Tracey Bracco

CNL Financial Group, Attorney

Terrance Freeman

Jacksonville City Council, Council Vice President

Michael Milligan

HSS Florida, MD, MBA, CAQSM

Davicka Thompson

Thompson Creative Collective, Inc., Founder & CEO

Doug Wiles

Herbie Wiles Insurance, President

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser