PLATINUM2024

Shyne San Diego

Resourcing Survivors to be Thrivers!

aka Shyne   |   Poway, CA   |  www.shynesd.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Shyne San Diego

EIN: 85-3605057


Mission

Shyne's mission is to accelerate the financial empowerment of survivors of sex trafficking and exploitation by offering comprehensive career coaching, business education (including financial literacy), credit repair, and access to paid work opportunities. Through our holistic approach, we equip survivors with the tools they need to achieve long-term economic independence and reclaim their futures.

Ruling year info

2021

CEO | Founder

Cynthia Luvlee

Main address

13446 Poway Road #557

Poway, CA 92064 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Shyne San Diego

EIN

85-3605057

Subject area info

Vocational education

Entrepreneurship

Freedom from violence and torture

Economic justice

Women's rights

Population served info

Young adults

Older adults

Ethnic and racial groups

Economically disadvantaged people

Victims of crime and abuse

NTEE code info

Management Services for Small Business/Entrepreneurs (S43)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Tax forms

Show Forms 990

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Shynes initiative directly impacts survivors of trafficking aspiring to become entrepreneurs with ownership rights. By offering tailored support, including mentorship and non-dilutive capital investment, we overcome barriers to accessing financial resources. Through our revenue-generating work collective, survivors will gain access to employment and profit-sharing opportunities, ensuring economic stability. Shyne promotes financial inclusion and economic justice for survivors of trafficking to improve their income level, become leaders of their communities, and acquire ownership of their business ideas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Survivor Business Network

Shyne provides survivors with the resources needed to thrive both personally and professionally. Serving all survivors regardless of age, race, gender, socio-economic status, or education level. The Survivor Business Network provides members with access to ongoing career classes, leadership development coaches, and credit repair. Survivors are given individualized support to meet their business goals at every stage of their personal and professional development.

Population(s) Served

Our one-on-one coaching sessions are held on the Dreami platform. In response to the rapid growth of our network, we have partnered with community-based professionals to provide high-level coaching services to survivors. Sessions are held weekly or bi-weekly depending on the survivor's unique career needs. We approach our members as though we work for them, allowing them to decide priorities and receive guidance on their most pressing needs. Our approach teaches leadership and builds confidence, provides access to a broader network of support professionals, and improves organizational skills through experiential learning.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Older adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse
Young adults
Older adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of employment placements defined as part-time (less than 35 hours per week)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post-program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

None of Shyne members have reported going back to the commercial sex trade or exchanging sex for money.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Shyne evaluates our programs through an in-depth survey each year. Those who complete the survey have reported 95-100% satisfaction with all programs, including coaching, classes, and network.

Additional revenue and wages generated attributable to the organization's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Shyne primarily focused on entrepreneurship, but many of our members seek employment for sustainable income while building their businesses. Shyne has employed 25 survivors through contract services.

Average change in income of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of financial literacy courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Survivor Business Network

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We partner with BMO, BofA, and USBank through the Survivor Inclusion Initiative which provides personal bankers to assist our members in attaining their financial goals.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Shyne fights the underlying causes of exploitation and provides survivors with three core programs with the goals of
1. Remove barriers to access to financial and business education and support
2. Improve the generational wealth gap
3. Support survivor economic equity and inclusion

All programming is survivor-centered, voluntary and trauma-informed which is maintained through consistent application of the following practices: (1) allowing our members to create community guiding principles, (2) using a strength based approach to learning, and (3) requiring a high level of confidentiality.

By providing free quality business and financial acumen, we remove the greatest barrier to access which is cost. Facilitated learning sessions are provided on a bi-weekly basis to the Shyne members of our Survivor Business Network™. One-to-one business coaching is provided for all members of the network.

It is well known that wealth can be generated through business ownership. It might be risky to get started, but the potential rewards can make it all worth it. Many family-owned businesses make it to the second generation. At Shyne, we equip all our members to successfully launch their own business ventures.

Shyne is leading the nation when it comes to partnering with financial institutions to implement innovative solutions. Developing term agreements for borrowing is done with the community we seek to invest in. This requires creating new financial products for survivors to access loans without credit history or collateral.

Shyne partners with universities, financial institutions, corporations, small business owners, and survivor entrepreneurs to achieve these goals. Shyne has 100+ volunteers providing educational classes in all areas of business, pro bono business coaches mentoring survivors, and 87 survivor entrepreneurs who meet regularly to advance the organization's capabilities. Additionally, Shyne is grassroots funded through corporate partners and individuals, allowing the organization to increase our ability to implement evaluation feedback and improve our programs more efficiently.

Shyne has provided 500+ hours of pro bono business coaching.
Shyne has helped establish 22 new banking accounts.
Shyne has served 87 survivor entrepreneurs since its inception.
Shyne has invested $64K in direct funding support to survivor businesses.
Shyne has supported the launch of 35 new survivor-owned businesses.
Shyne has connected 45 professional volunteers directly with survivor business owners.
Shyne has established ongoing Corporate support for more than 3 years with partners to achieve our mission.
Shyne has achieved none of our members going back to trafficking or exploitation.
Shyne has assisted members with receiving outside grants and funding totaling over $25K.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Shyne San Diego

Financial data

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Shyne San Diego

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Revenue
Contributions, Grants, Gifts $49,801
Program Services $0
Membership Dues $0
Special Events $0
Other Revenue $0
Total Revenue $49,801
Expenses
Program Services $39,456
Administration $4,151
Fundraising $0
Payments to Affiliates $0
Other Expenses $0
Total Expenses $43,607

Shyne San Diego

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: 2022

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assets
Total Assets $6,194
Liabilities
Total Liabilities $0
Fund balance (EOY)
Net Assets $6,194

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO | Founder

Cynthia Luvlee

Cynthia Luvlee, Founder and Executive Director of Shyne, has over twenty years of experience as a Nonprofit Startup Specialist. Her passion is creating and launching innovative social change organizations. In 2018, after a loved one became the victim of sexual assault, Cynthia shifted her attention to developing solutions for addressing sexual abuse and predation against women. Shyne is dedicated to survivor's economic independence through small business development and entrepreneurship. She believes addressing economic equity offers the greatest hope for survivors to lead the way in creating systemic and social impact reform. Cynthia earned a Bachelor of Arts in Social Work from San Diego State University and received her Holistic Health License through Body Mind College. She is certified in Grassroots Leadership Development as an Alumni of The Goldin Institute of Chicago. Cynthia has also received the Making a Difference for Women's Award from Soroptimist International.

There are no officers, directors or key employees recorded for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Shyne San Diego

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Sheila Cram

Shyne™

Term: 2024 - 2026

Sheila Cram

Mums Apothecary

Casey Johnson

Women's Community Health Center

Dawn Martinez

Sunshine CPA

Alita Lauren

Eternally Mused

Jazmyn Gasparri

Brave Embrace

Genevieve Solon

Marketing

Cynthia Austin

The Shen Way

Helen Stiver

Charming Little Lotus

Sara Martinez

Warmi Tote

Forrest Lang

Retired Veteran

Stephanie Huffman

Twilly23

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/25/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/25/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.